Results tagged ‘ yankee all star ’

January 2 – Happy Birthday David Cone

“Conie” joined the Yankees in 1995 and helped them reach postseason play in each of the six years he wore the pinstripes. A five-time All Star (twice as a Yankee), David had two 20-victory seasons during his 17 years in the big leagues and posted 21 shutouts. The year before he became a Yankee, he had been voted the AL Cy Young award-winner for his 16-5 season with the Royals. The Royals then traded him to the Blue Jays and Toronto traded him to New York after the 1995 All Star break for three Yankee prospects. Cone finished with a 64-40 record as a Yankee and 194-126 lifetime. His best year in New York was his 20-7 season in 1998. His absolute greatest moment in pinstripes occurred on July 18, 1999, when he pitched a perfect game against the Montreal Expos. Does anyone out there remember who made the last out of that game for the Expos? It was Expo shortstop Orlando Cabrera whose popup was caught in foul territory by Yankee third baseman, Scott Brosius.

Mr. Cone won a total of five World Series rings including four with the Yankees plus one with the Blue Jays in 1993. The right-hander had an overall 8-3 record in the postseason including his six wins and a loss in pinstriped fall ball.

Cone now is an analyst on Yes Network broadcasts of Yankee games. I like him in that role. When Jorge Posada was struggling with his reduced role with the 2011 Yankees, Cone talked about his own personal fight with the fact he could no longer play the game. His final Yankee season in 2000 had been the worst of his seventeen-year big league career, finishing with a 4-14 record and an ERA near seven. When the Yankees did not try to re-sign him, Cone signed with the Red Sox for $1 million and started for Boston during the 2001 season. He actually pitched pretty well for the Yankees’ arch-rivals, finishing the year with a 9-7 record. His best start of that season took place on the second day of September at Fenway Park against his old New York teammates in a classic pitchers’ duel between him and Mike Mussina.  I remember watching every pitch of that game. Cone was brilliant for eight innings, striking out eight and holding New York scoreless until Enrique Wilson’s ground ball double scored Tino Martinez with one out in the top of the ninth. Mussina was even better, pitching a perfect game until Carl Everett, pinch-hitting for Red Sox catcher Bob Oliver singled with two outs in the ninth. Mussina won the game 1-0 but Cone proved once again that he was a warrior on the mound.

I thought he was gone for good after that season but he reappeared two years later in a Met uniform and won his first start of the 2003 season for the Amazin’s. But then he got hammered in his next three and finally called it quits for good. During that 2011 discussion about Posada coming to terms with the end of his playing career, Cone admitted he wished he had retired after his final year in pinstripes.

Also born on this date was this Yankee middle reliever who led the AL in appearances in 2006.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1995 NYY 9 2 .818 3.82 13 13 0 1 0 0 99.0 82 42 42 12 47 89 1.303
1996 NYY 7 2 .778 2.88 11 11 0 1 0 0 72.0 50 25 23 3 34 71 1.167
1997 NYY 12 6 .667 2.82 29 29 0 1 0 0 195.0 155 67 61 17 86 222 1.236
1998 NYY 20 7 .741 3.55 31 31 0 3 0 0 207.2 186 89 82 20 59 209 1.180
1999 NYY 12 9 .571 3.44 31 31 0 1 1 0 193.1 164 84 74 21 90 177 1.314
2000 NYY 4 14 .222 6.91 30 29 0 0 0 0 155.0 192 124 119 25 82 120 1.768
17 Yrs 194 126 .606 3.46 450 419 9 56 22 1 2898.2 2504 1222 1115 258 1137 2668 1.256
NYM (7 yrs) 81 51 .614 3.13 187 169 4 34 15 1 1209.1 1011 472 421 91 431 1172 1.192
NYY (6 yrs) 64 40 .615 3.91 145 144 0 7 1 0 922.0 829 431 401 98 398 888 1.331
KCR (3 yrs) 27 19 .587 3.29 68 57 5 10 4 0 448.1 364 176 164 37 181 344 1.216
TOR (2 yrs) 13 9 .591 3.14 25 24 0 5 2 0 183.1 152 69 64 15 70 149 1.211
BOS (1 yr) 9 7 .563 4.31 25 25 0 0 0 0 135.2 148 74 65 17 57 115 1.511
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/2/2014.

December 31 – Happy Birthday Tommy Byrne

Tommy Byrne didn’t really have a nickname but if he did, it probably would have been “Wild Man.” This southpaw had a blazing fastball and a great biting curve but he had a real tough time throwing either of them over the plate with any consistency. Over his thirteen season big league career, the Baltimore native averaged just under seven walks for every nine innings he pitched, led the American League in that department three straight seasons and in one of them, 1951, he walked 150 batters in just 143 innings. And when Byrne didn’t walk a batter, chances were good that he’d hit him instead because the guy led the AL in hit batsmen five different times. So how did a pitcher who was so wild stay in the big leagues? There were two reasons really.

The first was that despite his aversion to the strike zone, Byrne would win games. He started pitching full time for the Yankees in 1948 and over the next three seasons his record was 38-21. He was a very effective fourth starter for New York, behind their legendary Raschi, Reynolds, Lopat triumvirate. The second reason the Yankees kept him was his ability to hit. Byrne was one of the best hitting pitchers in all of baseball. He averaged .326 in 1948 and .272 two seasons later. He was such a good stick that he was frequently used as a pinch hitter and actually had 80 pinch hits during his career.

So Manager Casey Stengel, Byrne’s Yankee teammates and even most Yankee fans would tolerate the left-handers mind-numbing spurts of wildness because he kept winning games and the team kept winning pennants in spite of them. Unfortunately for Byrne, the one guy who couldn’t tolerate it any longer turned out to be Yankee co-owner Dan Topping. On June 15th, 1951, Topping engineered a trade that sent Byrne to the Browns for another southpaw pitcher named Stubby Overmire. I read that Stengel was livid with Topping when he learned of the trade after it had already been consummated.

The Yankees didn’t miss Tommy at first because they still had the big three in their starting rotation along with a new young southpaw named Whitey Ford. Byrne, on the other hand did not find pitching for the lowly Browns anywhere near as enjoyable as pitching for the mighty Yankees. He went 11-24 during his two seasons in St. Louis and then was traded to the White Sox.

In addition to being wild, Byrne turned out to be pretty lucky too. By 1954, Raschi was gone and Reynolds and Lopat were nearing the end of their careers. Byrne in the mean time, had been sold by the White Sox to the Senators and then released. He spent most of the 1954 season pitching for Seattle in the PCL League, where he went 20-10 on the mound and hit .296 at the plate. That performance caught the attention of the Yankees and the then-34-year-old pitcher suddenly found himself back in pinstripes at the close of the 1954 season. The following year, Byrne rejoined the Yankees’ starting rotation and went 16-5 to lead the AL in winning percentage. He also pitched very well in the 1955 World Series against the Dodgers. Bryne got a complete-game 4-2 victory in Game 2 and also drove in the winning runs with his two-run single. He then held the Dodgers to just one run for five-plus innings of Game 7 before being lifted by Stengel in a game the Yankees would go on to lose.

Byrne pitched two more seasons for New York and then went back to college at Wake Forest. He ended his career with an 85-69 overall record and 72-40 as an eleven-year Yankee. He ended up getting into politics and served as Mayor of the college town for fifteen years. He passed away in 2007, at the age of 87. One of the things I learned about Byrne doing research for this post was that he was considered to be a flake. He was known for talking to opposing hitters during the game and according to Yogi Berra, Byrne’s chit chatting would drive all stars like Ted Williams and Al Rosen absolutely crazy. Often times, he would tell the hitter what pitch he was about to throw. The talking combined with his sharp biting curve ball and lack of control made Byrne Yogi’s choice as the toughest pitcher he ever had to catch.

Byrne shares his last-day-of-the-year birthday with this other former Yankee starting pitcher.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1943 NYY 2 1 .667 6.54 11 2 8 0 0 0 31.2 28 26 23 1 35 22 1.989
1946 NYY 0 1 .000 5.79 4 1 3 0 0 0 9.1 7 8 6 1 8 5 1.607
1947 NYY 0 0 4.15 4 1 2 0 0 0 4.1 5 2 2 0 6 2 2.538
1948 NYY 8 5 .615 3.30 31 11 11 5 1 2 133.2 79 55 49 8 101 93 1.347
1949 NYY 15 7 .682 3.72 32 30 2 12 3 0 196.0 125 84 81 11 179 129 1.551
1950 NYY 15 9 .625 4.74 31 31 0 10 2 0 203.1 188 115 107 23 160 118 1.711
1951 TOT 6 11 .353 4.26 28 20 3 7 2 0 143.2 120 73 68 5 150 71 1.879
1951 NYY 2 1 .667 6.86 9 3 1 0 0 0 21.0 16 17 16 0 36 14 2.476
1954 NYY 3 2 .600 2.70 5 5 0 4 1 0 40.0 36 13 12 1 19 24 1.375
1955 NYY 16 5 .762 3.15 27 22 4 9 3 2 160.0 137 69 56 12 87 76 1.400
1956 NYY 7 3 .700 3.36 37 8 18 1 0 6 109.2 108 50 41 9 72 52 1.641
1957 NYY 4 6 .400 4.36 30 4 16 1 0 2 84.2 70 41 41 8 60 57 1.535
13 Yrs 85 69 .552 4.11 281 170 72 65 12 12 1362.0 1138 688 622 98 1037 766 1.597
NYY (11 yrs) 72 40 .643 3.93 221 118 65 42 10 12 993.2 799 480 434 74 763 592 1.572
SLB (2 yrs) 11 24 .314 4.35 48 41 7 21 2 0 318.2 286 173 154 21 226 148 1.607
WSH (1 yr) 0 5 .000 4.28 6 5 0 2 0 0 33.2 35 17 16 3 22 22 1.693
CHW (1 yr) 2 0 1.000 10.13 6 6 0 0 0 0 16.0 18 18 18 0 26 4 2.750
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/31/2013.

December 7 – Happy Birthday Tino Martinez

Tino Martinez was a great Yankee. During his seven seasons in New York, this Tampa native who was born in 1967, drove in 739 runs, hit 192 of his 339 career home runs and won four World Series rings. He also happened to be my wife’s all-time favorite baseball player. So instead of spending the rest of this post describing the biggest highlights of Tino’s career in pinstripes, I’m going to tell you a story about how my wife met Tino Martinez. It happened in my Oldsmobile Minivan outside of Yankee Stadium, about ten years ago and to those of you with your minds in the gutter, it was not “that” type of meeting.

My wife and I had taken our kids to a Yankee Game. As we were leaving the Stadium parking garage I was trying to maneuver the van into a certain exit line so I could take a simple right-hand turn and get onto the Major Deegan Expressway heading north toward home. I had driven to Yankee games at least forty times in my life and had parked in that same garage most of those times. From experience I knew if I used any other exit, barricades would block me from taking a right turn and force me to go left which meant I’d have to spend the next two hours riding through the unfamiliar streets of the South Bronx to get back on the Deegan going in the right direction.

That’s when my wife uttered her famous phrase. “Why are we waiting in this long line? There’s no cars over at that exit why don’t we just go out there?” My immediate reaction was to ignore the question and simply hope she wouldn’t ask it again. No such luck. I don’t remember if it was the third or fourth time she repeated her inquiry that I patiently tried to explain that the reason there were no cars at the other exit was because you couldn’t take a right-hand turn from that location. I tried to point out that every driver in the fifty or so cars in front of us and the one hundred or so vehicles behind us knew that if you took a left instead of a right from this side of the parking garage you would spend the next five hours driving underneath elevated subway platforms and past six thousand auto body shops with pit bulls chained to razor-wire-topped chain link fences, as you cruised aimlessly through South Bronx looking for the one and only sign in the entire borough that directs you to the Deegan North.Her response? “That’s stupid. I’m sure you can take a right from that exit too. Just go that way. We are going to be stuck in this line forever. I’d go that way if I were driving.”So what did I do? I gave up my place in line and drove to the other exit and sure enough as we drove through the gate the familiar wooden blue NYPD barricades blocked me from taking the right I needed to make and forced me left.

Why did I listen to my wife? Forgive my chauvinism but I know there are many married male readers out there who follow the same rule I do while driving in heavy traffic. If there’s a choice between doing something you know is stupid or not doing it and then getting in an argument with your wife over it, you just follow her stupid advice. Why? Because in the long run, spending two hours lost in the Bronx was better than spending the rest of the ride home and at least the next five days living with a woman who is mad at you for not taking her bad advice.

So I’m now outside the Stadium garage and I’m being forced to head either the wrong way on the Deegan or head back up River Avenue toward the same Stadium we were trying to leave. Usually there was a cop on duty at that corner forcing cars away from the Stadium but for some reason, that day there was just an empty police car sitting there. So I took the left and then I think another left and perhaps another, and before you know it, I had gotten my van onto Ruppert Place which runs right alongside the Stadium itself. In front of me was the same ramp to the Deegan I normally took when I made the correct right hand turn out of the garage. The only thing blocking my path was a huge bus, sitting right there in the middle of the intersection with its passenger door open. We were so close to the bus that we could actually see through the reflective glass of the closed passenger windows.I was about to ask the question, “Isn’t that Tino Martinez in that window?” when I heard my wife screaming at the top of her lungs, “Teeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeno Marteeeeeeeeeeeeeenez, over here, I love youuuuuu! Teeeeeeno! Teeeeno!”

She was actually standing on the front seat of our minivan and had somehow gotten the entire top three quarters of her body out of the passenger side window yelling as loudly as possible and waving her arms and hands frantically. I had never in my life seen a human being get so excited about seeing a baseball player and evidently, neither had Tino and the rest of the Yankees. My better half (or I should say three quarters of my better half) was making such a commotion that Constantino “Tino” Martinez actually opened his passenger window, laughing at my wife’s enthusiasm, and yelled hello and waved to her. As the bus began to move, me and the kids were able to successfully pull my wife’s contorted body out of the window and get her buckled back into her seat. As we made our way back up the New York State Thruway that evening and I listened to my wife and kids talk and laugh about our encounter with the Yankee player’s bus, I was glad I took that stupid left instead of waiting in line to make my usual right.

Today is also the birthday of this six-time Gold Glove winner and these two former Yankee outfielders who all played their best baseball before they put on the pinstripes.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1996 NYY 155 671 595 82 174 28 0 25 117 2 68 85 .292 .364 .466 .830
1997 NYY 158 685 594 96 176 31 2 44 141 3 75 75 .296 .371 .577 .948
1998 NYY 142 608 531 92 149 33 1 28 123 2 61 83 .281 .355 .505 .860
1999 NYY 159 665 589 95 155 27 2 28 105 3 69 86 .263 .341 .458 .800
2000 NYY 155 632 569 69 147 37 4 16 91 4 52 74 .258 .328 .422 .749
2001 NYY 154 635 589 89 165 24 2 34 113 1 42 89 .280 .329 .501 .830
16 Yrs 2023 8044 7111 1008 1925 365 21 339 1271 27 780 1069 .271 .344 .471 .815
NYY (7 yrs) 1054 4244 3770 566 1039 189 11 192 739 17 405 546 .276 .347 .484 .831
SEA (6 yrs) 543 2139 1896 250 502 106 6 88 312 3 198 309 .265 .334 .466 .801
STL (2 yrs) 288 1123 987 129 264 50 3 36 144 4 111 142 .267 .345 .434 .778
TBD (1 yr) 138 538 458 63 120 20 1 23 76 3 66 72 .262 .362 .461 .823
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/7/2013.