Results tagged ‘ utility infielder ’

January 3 – Happy Birthday Luis Sojo

Luis Sojo was one of my favorite Yankees. He had that wonderful ability to sit on the bench for most of a game and then grab his glove and instantly make a difficult play look easy from any infield position. I also would get a kick out of his rumpled appearance in a Yankee uniform, which always reminded me sort of the way Yogi Berra looked in pinstripes. The Yankees first got him off waivers from Seattle during the 1996 season and the following year, the native Venezuelan took over the starting second base position from Mariano Duncan. When the Yankees acquired Chuck Knoblauch from the Twins to play second in 1998, Sojo became the team’s reliable utility infielder. After the 1999 season, Luis signed as a free agent with the Pirates but when Knoblauch’s strange throwing problems peaked, New York traded to get Sojo back in August of 2000, setting up his most magical moment as a Yankee. That came in the ninth inning of the fifth and final game of that season’s Subway Series. With the score tied 2-2 in the top of the ninth, Sojo came to bat for the first time after being inserted to play second base in the previous inning. His ground ball single through the middle off of Al Leiter scored Jorge Posada from second. Scott Brosius also scored on the play when the throw home trying to nail Posada was way off the mark and the Yankees were once again World Champs. I was thrilled for Sojo. The guy won four rings as a Yankee. He then became New York’s third base coach for a couple of seasons and until last year, managed the Yankees Tampa Minor League club.

Today is also the birthday of this former Yankee pitcher and this colorful pre-WWII outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1996 NYY 18 44 40 3 11 2 0 0 5 0 1 4 .275 .286 .325 .611
1997 NYY 77 239 215 27 66 6 1 2 25 3 16 14 .307 .355 .372 .727
1998 NYY 54 153 147 16 34 3 1 0 14 1 4 15 .231 .250 .265 .515
1999 NYY 49 133 127 20 32 6 0 2 16 1 4 17 .252 .275 .346 .621
2000 NYY 34 134 125 19 36 7 1 2 17 1 6 6 .288 .321 .408 .729
2001 NYY 39 84 79 5 13 2 0 0 9 1 4 12 .165 .214 .190 .404
2003 NYY 3 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
13 Yrs 848 2773 2571 300 671 103 12 36 261 28 124 198 .261 .297 .352 .650
NYY (7 yrs) 274 791 737 90 192 26 3 6 86 7 35 68 .261 .294 .328 .623
SEA (3 yrs) 242 861 799 102 209 35 5 14 77 8 41 57 .262 .300 .370 .671
CAL (2 yrs) 219 793 732 75 194 26 4 10 63 11 28 50 .265 .297 .352 .650
TOR (2 yrs) 52 139 127 19 26 5 0 1 15 1 9 7 .205 .255 .268 .523
PIT (1 yr) 61 189 176 14 50 11 0 5 20 1 11 16 .284 .328 .432 .760
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/4/2014.

December 29 – Happy Birthday Bill Knickerbocker

knickerbockerThis L.A.-born shortstop was signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1931 and two year’s later he was the Tribe’s starting shortstop. An adept contact hitter, Knickerbocker might have become one of Cleveland’s all-time great shortstops if he didn’t have to actually play the field. This guy made 125 errors at that position during his three-and-a-half seasons as an Indian. So even though his lifetime average was a lofty .293 at the time and he was only 24-years-old, when his error total reached 40 during the 1936 season, Knickerbocker was traded to the Browns in January of the following year.

After his only season in St. Louis, he was dealt to the Yankees. New York had just released veteran second baseman, Tony Lazzeri following the 1937 World Series. Joe McCarthy intended to replace him with rookie Joe Gordon, but he wanted a safety valve just in case the kid wasn’t ready for prime time.

Fortunately for today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant, Yankee shortstop Frank Crosetti suffered a leg injury during spring training and Knickerbocker got plenty of opportunities to show the Yankee skipper his lively bat more than made up for his less than average glove work.

Sure enough, Gordon got off to a horrible start at the plate in ’38 and by May 1st, he was back in the minors and Knickerbocker was starting at second for New York. The move to the new position actually improved his defense and he set a career high in fielding percentage during his first season in pinstripes.

In the mean time, Gordon got his stroke back down on the farm and when he returned to the parent club in June, his torrid bat helped propel New York to the team’s third straight World Championship. The only one who suffered from Gordon’s emergence as an all star was, of course Knickerbocker, who saw action in just seven games during the final three months of the ’38 season and completely sat out that year’s World Series sweep of the Cubs.

In 1939, Knickerbocker had pretty-much a no-show job as Gordon started all but three regular season games at second for New York and Crosetti missed just two starts at short. In 1940, Knickerbocker saw prolonged stretches of playing time at both short and third due to injuries to Crosetti and Red Rolfe. His defense was again better than average though his offense was disappearing, no doubt due to the lack of playing time.

That December, New York traded Knickerbocker to the White Sox for catcher Ken Silvestri. Following the 1942 regular season, Chicago put him on waivers and he spent the ’43 season playing in the Pacific Coast League. He then entered the US Army and served his Country during WWII for the next two years. Though the Yankees invited him to their 1946 spring training camp, he failed to make the team and never again played big league or minor league ball. Knickerbocker was struck down by a heart attack in 1961, passing away at the age of just fifty-one.

He shares his December 29th birthday with this one-time Yankee first baseman, this other former Yankee first baseman, this former Yankee pitcher, and this long-ago Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1938 NYY 46 143 128 15 32 8 3 1 21 0 11 10 .250 .309 .383 .692
1939 NYY 6 13 13 2 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 .154 .154 .231 .385
1940 NYY 45 145 124 17 30 8 1 1 10 1 14 8 .242 .333 .347 .680
10 Yrs 907 3755 3418 423 943 198 27 28 368 25 244 238 .276 .326 .374 .700
CLE (4 yrs) 513 2199 2030 260 594 117 16 14 227 14 119 131 .293 .333 .387 .719
NYY (3 yrs) 97 301 265 34 64 17 4 2 32 1 25 18 .242 .314 .358 .672
PHA (1 yr) 87 328 289 25 73 12 0 1 19 1 29 30 .253 .323 .304 .627
SLB (1 yr) 121 530 491 53 128 29 5 4 61 3 30 32 .261 .303 .365 .668
CHW (1 yr) 89 397 343 51 84 23 2 7 29 6 41 27 .245 .329 .385 .714
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/30/2013.

December 9 – Happy Birthday Joe DeMaestri

demaestriI really started collecting baseball cards in 1961. As a passionate six-year-old Yankee fan at the time, opening a nickel pack of Topps cards and discovering a Bronx Bomber inside felt like I had found a thousand dollar bill, well maybe not in all cases.

I can remember feeling no such thrill when I got the card pictured with today’s featured Pinstripe Birthday post. I’m sure Joe DeMaestri was a great guy and in his prime he was considered one of the upper tier shortstops in the American League. But he had spent those prime years of his career playing for the A’s in both Philadelphia and Kansas City.

Even though over a half century has passed since I purchased the pack from Puglisi’s Confectionary on Guy Park Avenue in my hometown of Amsterdam, NY, I still clearly remember this card. That’s because in addition to being perhaps the least recognized player on that 1961 Yankee team, DeMaestri wasn’t even wearing a Yankee hat when they took his picture for the card and I used to hate when that happened. Still, he was a Yankee and therefore it was a Yankee card so I figured it was a nickel well spent, just not one that returned that customary thrill worth a thousand bucks.

As it turned out, that 1961 season was this San Francisco native’s final year in the big leagues. The Yankees had acquired him in the historic seven player deal they made with Kansas City that also put Roger Maris in pinstripes. Nicknamed “Oats,” DeMaestri had been New York’s primary utility infielder for two seasons, appearing in just 79 total games during that span but getting the opportunity to play in his only World Series in 1960 and win his only ring in ’61. His most noteworthy moment in Yankee history took place in the eighth inning of the seventh game of that ’60 fall classic in Pittsburgh. It was DeMaestri who replaced Tony Kubek at short, after Bill Virdon’s certain double-play grounder hit a stone in the Forbes Field infield and struck Tony Kubek in the throat. In addition to almost killing the Yankee shortstop, the play started the rally that enabled Pittsburgh to erase a three run deficit and take a two-run lead. Ironically, all season long, New York manager Casey Stengel had been shifting Kubek from shortstop to replace Yogi Berra in left field in the eighth inning of games in which the Yankees had the lead. DeMaestri would then replace Kubek at short. For some reason, the “Ol Perfessor” didn’t make that move that afternoon in Forbes Field and you have to wonder how DeMaestri would have approached and been able to play that same ground ball.

In any event, my older brother Jerry and I were able to collect every card in that 1961 Topps series, but unlike all the rest of those we collected as kids, I don’t have this DeMaestri card anymore. Tragically, the younger brother of one of Jerry’s classmates was struck by a car and killed that year. I still remember walking up to his house a few days later with my brother and giving his grieving friend our entire collection of 1961 Topps baseball cards as our way of expressing sympathy for his loss.

He shares his birthday with this former Yankee starting pitcher and a Yankee franchise Hall-of-Famer nobody remembers.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1960 NYY 49 36 35 8 8 1 0 0 2 0 0 9 .229 .229 .257 .486
1961 NYY 30 41 41 1 6 0 0 0 2 0 0 13 .146 .146 .146 .293
11 Yrs 1121 3679 3441 322 813 114 23 49 281 15 168 511 .236 .274 .325 .599
KCA (7 yrs) 905 3325 3105 292 742 104 20 47 256 15 155 453 .239 .277 .331 .608
NYY (2 yrs) 79 77 76 9 14 1 0 0 4 0 0 22 .184 .184 .197 .382
SLB (1 yr) 81 198 186 13 42 9 1 1 18 0 8 25 .226 .258 .301 .559
CHW (1 yr) 56 79 74 8 15 0 2 1 3 0 5 11 .203 .253 .297 .550
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/8/2013.