Results tagged ‘ third baseman ’

September 18 – Happy Birthday Brent Lillibridge

lillibridgeA few years from now, today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant will certainly be one of the more difficult-to-remember answers to the trivia question; “Can you name someone who played third base for the Yankees during the 2013 regular season?” Brent Lillibridge’s first day in pinstripes was a sad one in Yankee Universe. He was called up from Scranton/Wilkes Barre to take the place of Derek Jeter in July, after the Yankee Captain’s first attempt to play in 2013 ended with a strained quad and a return trip to the DL.

Unfortunately for Lillibridge, he hit just .171 during his 11-game sojourn at the Yankees’ hot-corner position and quickly lost the job. Ironically, Lillibridge was one of the White Sox players traded to Boston in 2012 for Kevin Youklis, who was supposed to be the Yankees’ starting third baseman in 2013 until A-Rod returned from his offseason hip surgery.

Don’t feel too sorry for this native of Everett, Washington who turns 30 years old today. Despite the fact that the Yankees were the sixth team he’s played for during his six seasons in the big leagues and despite the fact that as of today his lifetime average in the Majors is just .205, the guy has earned over $2 million in salary during that time. That’s about double what the Yankees paid Hall-of-Famer, Mickey Mantle for his eighteen years of service in pinstripes.

He shares his birthday with this long-ago Yankee pitcher and this more current one too.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2013 NYY 11 37 35 2 6 1 0 0 3 1 1 8 .171 .194 .200 .394
6 Yrs 358 784 708 102 145 25 4 19 71 37 49 235 .205 .267 .332 .599
CHW (4 yrs) 256 499 442 76 96 13 3 15 50 28 38 150 .217 .291 .362 .653
ATL (1 yr) 29 85 80 9 16 6 1 1 8 2 3 23 .200 .238 .338 .576
BOS (1 yr) 10 16 16 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 .125 .125 .125 .250
CHC (1 yr) 9 24 24 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 9 .042 .042 .042 .083
CLE (1 yr) 43 123 111 15 24 5 0 3 8 6 7 40 .216 .276 .342 .619
NYY (1 yr) 11 37 35 2 6 1 0 0 3 1 1 8 .171 .194 .200 .394
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/20/2013.

September 9 – Happy Birthday Todd Zeile

zeileTodd Zeile had a very impressive first game as a Yankee. The Bronx Bombers had signed this native of Van Nuys, California in December of 2002, when he was a 37-year-old, fourteen-year veteran coming off a strong year with the Colorado Rockies. New York intended to use him as a back-up to Robin Ventura at third base. Ventura had done better than any body expected during his first season in the Bronx, smashing 27 home runs and driving in 93, but he too was getting up there in years. Having the right-hand hitting Zeile spell him against the occasional southpaw seemed like a great idea at the time.

He made his first start for New York in Game 3 of that 2003 season against the Blue Jays in Toronto. He homered against the huge left-hander Mark Hendrickson, in his first-ever pinstriped at bat. He also hit two doubles and drove in three runs that night. That debut performance turned out to be the highlight of his single-season Yankee career. When the Yankees released him that August, he was hitting just .210, with 6 home runs and 23 RBI’s in 66 games. Worse yet was the fact that Ventura also had stopped hitting that season, leaving the Yankees scrambling to come up with offense from the third base position. They solved that problem at the trading deadline when they acquired Aaron Boone from the Reds. The rest of course is Yankee history.

Zeile was picked up by the Expos and then finished his big league career the following year in a Mets’ uniform. He shares his September 9th birthday with this Hall of Fame pitcher, this Hall of Fame manager and this former Yankee center fielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2003 NYY 66 214 186 29 39 8 0 6 23 0 24 36 .210 .294 .349 .644
16 Yrs 2158 8649 7573 986 2004 397 23 253 1110 53 945 1279 .265 .346 .423 .769
G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
STL (7 yrs) 757 3087 2694 356 719 149 13 75 394 33 346 410 .267 .349 .415 .764
NYM (3 yrs) 441 1631 1423 163 368 77 4 41 176 4 191 270 .259 .348 .405 .753
TEX (2 yrs) 208 869 768 106 219 55 2 30 126 2 84 126 .285 .355 .479 .834
LAD (2 yrs) 200 842 733 111 194 23 1 38 117 9 95 136 .265 .352 .454 .806
COL (1 yr) 144 580 506 61 138 23 0 18 87 1 66 92 .273 .353 .425 .778
PHI (1 yr) 134 572 500 61 134 24 0 20 80 1 67 88 .268 .353 .436 .789
MON (1 yr) 34 127 113 11 29 2 2 5 19 1 10 18 .257 .331 .442 .773
CHC (1 yr) 79 325 299 34 68 16 0 9 30 0 16 53 .227 .271 .371 .642
NYY (1 yr) 66 214 186 29 39 8 0 6 23 0 24 36 .210 .294 .349 .644
FLA (1 yr) 66 270 234 37 68 12 1 6 39 2 31 34 .291 .374 .427 .801
BAL (1 yr) 29 132 117 17 28 8 0 5 19 0 15 16 .239 .326 .436 .762
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/17/2013.

September 3 – Happy Birthday Chris Nelson

nelsonWhat do David Adams, Luis Cruz, Alberto Gonzalez, Brent Lillibridge, Jayson Nix, Eduardo Nunez, Mark Reynolds, Alex Rodriguez, Vernon Wells, Kevin Youklis and today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant have in common? They all played third base for the Yankees during the 2013 regular season.

Chris Nelson was the .300-hitting starting third baseman of the Colorado Rockies during the 2012 season. That same job was his to lose on Opening Day of 2013 and he ended up losing it to Rockie rookie Nelson Aranado. When Kevin Youklis’s back did not hold up during the first month of the season, the Yankees acquired Nelson from Colorado on May 1, 2013. New York skipper, Joe Grardi then started the native of Escondido, California at the hot corner for ten straight games. Defensively, he did fine but his .222 batting average and 2 RBI’s convinced the Yankee brass he wasn’t the answer long-term and he ended up on waivers. The Angels then picked him up and on August 1. He started playing third base regularly for his third big league team this season, when LA-Anaheim’s starter at that position, Alberto Callaspo went on the DL. On August 15th, Nelson got some revenge on the Yankees when he drove in five runs against his former team to prevent New York from an important series sweep.

On August 29th, the injury bug hit Nelson too. While running to first he pulled a hamstring pretty badly and it sounds like he’s done for the season. Nelson shares a birthday with this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2013 NYY 10 37 36 3 8 2 0 0 2 0 1 11 .222 .243 .278 .521
4 Yrs 255 820 761 91 204 36 8 16 93 8 48 189 .268 .312 .399 .712
COL (4 yrs) 212 664 616 78 172 33 6 13 73 6 39 142 .279 .322 .416 .738
LAA (1 yr) 33 119 109 10 24 1 2 3 18 2 8 36 .220 .277 .349 .626
NYY (1 yr) 10 37 36 3 8 2 0 0 2 0 1 11 .222 .243 .278 .521
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/3/2013.

August 15 – Happy Birthday Scott Brosius

If you watched last evening’s (8/14/2013) Yankee game, in which New York destroyed the Angels for the second consecutive night, you heard Paul O’Neill tell his TV booth partners that the 1998 Yankee team he played on was as close to a perfect team as he had ever been associated with. I couldn’t agree more.

The 1961 Yankees were my favorite team of all time and the 1978 Yankees were the most dramatic. The 1996 Yankees gave me the biggest thrill I ever had as a baseball fan but it was the 1998 Yankees who were the best team I’ve ever seen play a season, beginning to end. And if you had to point to one roster change that made the biggest difference between the team that lost the Divisional playoffs to Cleveland the year before and the one that won 114 regular season games and swept the Padres in the 1998 World Series, it would be the addition of Scott Brosius as New York’s starting third baseman. Born on today’s date in 1966, in Hillsboro, OR, the Yankees signed Brosius as a free agent after he spent his first seven big league seasons in Oakland.

Joe Torre inserted his right-handed bat at the bottom of the Yankee lineup. Brosius responded by hitting .300, smacking 19 home runs, scoring 86 runs and driving in 98 more. He turned the bottom of that lineup into an opposing pitcher’s nightmare and he played superb defense as well. But he saved his best for that year’s post season, batting close to .400 in thirteen October games and winning the 1998 World Series MVP award. He was an AL All Star that first year in pinstripes, a Gold Glove winner in 1999, and his thrilling game-winning home run during Game 5 of the 2001 Series against Arizona was a fitting culmination of his brief but great Yankee career.

Brosius shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1998 NYY 152 603 530 86 159 34 0 19 98 11 52 97 .300 .371 .472 .843
1999 NYY 133 529 473 64 117 26 1 17 71 9 39 74 .247 .307 .414 .722
2000 NYY 135 519 470 57 108 20 0 16 64 0 45 73 .230 .299 .374 .673
2001 NYY 120 478 428 57 123 25 2 13 49 3 34 83 .287 .343 .446 .789
11 Yrs 1146 4356 3889 544 1001 200 8 141 531 57 348 699 .257 .323 .422 .744
OAK (7 yrs) 606 2227 1988 280 494 95 5 76 249 34 178 372 .248 .315 .416 .731
NYY (4 yrs) 540 2129 1901 264 507 105 3 65 282 23 170 327 .267 .331 .428 .759
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/15/2013.

May 19 – Happy Birthday Gil McDougald

bd6e9fb2-765d-41c5-a3fb-3ff54c36ef4aThe Yankee teams of the 1950s were among the best in the elite franchise’s illustrious history. Managed by Casey Stengel, they won eight of the decade’s ten possible Pennants and six World Championships. One of the key members of those great teams was a Scottish-American infielder, born in San Francisco by the name of Gil McDougald. Signed by the Yankees out of the University of San Francisco in 1948, McDougald tore up Minor League pitching, averaging .340 during his three-year climb through the Yankee farm system. He was brought up to the Bronx in 1951 along with a much more heralded Yankee rookie named Mantle. It was McDougald who won that season’s Rookie of the Year award with a .306 average. In that year’s World Series against the cross-town Giants, McDougald became the first rookie to hit a grand slam home run in Fall Classic history.

Stengel loved McDougald’s defensive versatility and took full advantage of it. During his career in the Bronx, the infielder played 599 games at second, 508 at the hot corner and another 284 at shortstop and was selected as an All Star at all three positions. He had a lifetime batting average of .276 and hit 112 regular season and seven World Series home runs.

Two line drives had tremendous impact upon McDougald’s career. The first came off the bat of Yankee teammate, Bob Cerv during batting practice before a game in August of 1955. McDougald was standing near second base and the ball struck him in the left ear. Even though no one realized it at the time, the resulting damage caused a gradual hearing loss that resulted in McDougald being almost completely deaf early on in his retirement years. In 1957, another line drive, this one off McDougald’s bat, hit Cleveland Indian pitching sensation, Herb Score square in the face. Score was never again the same pitcher and McDougald later admitted that the incident impacted his play as well.

After the Yankees suffered their heartbreaking loss to the Pirates in the 1960 World Series, the front office informed Gil that he would not be protected in the upcoming AL expansion draft. McDougald decided to call it quits at that time. He died in November of 2010, at the age of 82.

Gil shares his May 19th birthday with this one-time Yankee catcher and this former Yankee starting pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1951 NYY 131 473 402 72 123 23 4 14 63 14 56 54 .306 .396 .488 .884
1952 NYY 152 633 555 65 146 16 5 11 78 6 57 73 .263 .336 .369 .705
1953 NYY 141 614 541 82 154 27 7 10 83 3 60 65 .285 .361 .416 .777
1954 NYY 126 474 394 66 102 22 2 12 48 3 62 64 .259 .364 .416 .780
1955 NYY 141 615 533 79 152 10 8 13 53 6 65 77 .285 .361 .407 .768
1956 NYY 120 518 438 79 136 13 3 13 56 3 68 59 .311 .405 .443 .848
1957 NYY 141 625 539 87 156 25 9 13 62 2 59 71 .289 .362 .442 .804
1958 NYY 138 578 503 69 126 19 1 14 65 6 59 75 .250 .329 .376 .705
1959 NYY 127 481 434 44 109 16 8 4 34 0 35 40 .251 .309 .353 .661
1960 NYY 119 387 337 54 87 16 4 8 34 2 38 45 .258 .337 .401 .737
10 Yrs 1336 5398 4676 697 1291 187 51 112 576 45 559 623 .276 .356 .410 .766
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/19/2013.

April 16 – Happy Birthday Bernie Allen

ballenWhen Bernie Allen graduated from high school in his hometown of East Liverpool, OH, he was a good enough school-boy quarterback to get a scholarship offer from Purdue University. Problem was Bernie didn’t like playing football but he knew if he wanted to go to college, accepting that scholarship was the only way he’d be able to, so that’s what he did. During his time on the gridiron as a Boilermaker, he became one of the better QB’s in the Big Ten but he also got the opportunity to play collegiate baseball and become an All American in that sport. In early 1961, the Minnesota Twins made Allen one of the first amateurs signed by that team after it had relocated to the Twin Cities from our Nation’s capitol.

After just one year in the minors, he made the Twins big league roster during the team’s 1962 spring training season. Minnesota’s first year manager, Sam Mele liked his rookie infielder so much, he benched the veteran Billy Martin and started Allen at second base. Mele also installed a second rookie, third baseman Rich Rollins in his starting infield and the two first-year players helped the surprising Twins finish in second place with 91 wins, a 20-game improvement over the previous season. Bernie had 154 hits that year including 12 home runs, with 64 RBIs and finished third in the AL Rookie-of-theYear balloting. Though I was just 8-years-old at the time, I clearly remember that 1962 Minnesota team because in addition to battling my Yankees for the Pennant, every player in their starting lineup reached double figures in home runs that season.

Allen got off to a horrendously slow start at the plate in his sophomore season and his batting average was still under.200 by late August. He then hit .320 during the last six weeks of the ’63 season, saving his starting job in the process. But his potential to develop into a perennial big league All Star was wiped out with one play during the 1964 season. Attempting to turn a double play, Allen was bowled over by Don Zimmer who rolled over the second baseman’s leg. Allen had torn his ACL, but the injury was mis-diagnosed by Minnesota’a team doctors. When the leg didn’t get better, Allen got his own doctors to examine the knee and they made a correct diagnosis and operated five months after the injury occurred. By then however, the ligament had shriveled and the surgeon didn’t think Allen would ever again play baseball. He proved that doctor wrong but it does explain why all of Allen’s highest single-season offensive numbers took place during that 1962 rookie season. He was simply never the same player after Zimmer rolled his knee.

The Yankees got Bernie in 1972. The Twins had traded him to the Senators after the 1966 season and he played pretty regularly for Washington for five years, right up until that franchise moved to Texas. He then became Ralph Houk’s primary utility infielder during the 1972 season, appearing in 84 games, mostly as a third baseman, but hitting a paltry .227 in the process. It was that weak bat that got him sold to the Expos in August of 1973. When he hit just .180, the then 34-year-old Allen hung up his glove for good.

He shares his April 16th birthday with this former Yankee back-up catcher and this Hall-of-Fame outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1972 NYY 84 248 220 26 50 9 0 9 22 0 23 42 .227 .296 .391 .686
1973 NYY 17 62 57 5 13 3 0 0 4 0 5 5 .228 .290 .281 .571
12 Yrs 1139 3824 3404 357 815 140 21 73 352 13 370 424 .239 .314 .357 .671
MIN (5 yrs) 492 1789 1595 195 392 75 10 32 163 3 165 212 .246 .316 .366 .682
WSA (5 yrs) 530 1669 1482 126 351 52 11 30 154 10 172 161 .237 .317 .348 .665
NYY (2 yrs) 101 310 277 31 63 12 0 9 26 0 28 47 .227 .294 .368 .663
MON (1 yr) 16 56 50 5 9 1 0 2 9 0 5 4 .180 .255 .320 .575
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/23/2014.

April 13 – Happy Birthday Oscar Grimes

grimesThe great Joe McCarthy really was a players’ manager but that didn’t mean he was a pushover, far from it. During the 1942 season, Bill Dickey got hurt. His backup that season and heir apparent as Yankee catcher was a 27-year-old native of Buffalo, NY named Buddy Rosar. Rosar was married and had a kid and with the world at war, he was worried about his future. He felt he needed a career to fall back on in case he didn’t make it as a big league catcher so he made a fateful decision to leave the Yankees for a couple of days to take a policeman’s exam back in his native Buffalo. During his absence, the Yankees played a double header on a very hot afternoon and McCarthy had no choice but to start 35-year-old Rollie Hemsley behind the plate for both games. When the day was done, Hemsley was near collapse from physical exhaustion and McCarthy was determined to get rid of Rosar.

The trade took place ten days after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. Rosar and Yankee outfielder Roy Cullenbine were sent to Cleveland for outfielder Roy Weatherly and today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant. Oscar Grimes had been around baseball all his life. His father Ray had been a first baseman for the Cubs during the 1920′s and his uncle Roy Grimes, had once played second base for the New York Giants. Oscar was an infielder too and one of the reasons Marse Joe wanted him was his ability to play any of the four infield positions.

That flexibility didn’t earn the native of Minerva, OH much playing time during his first season in New York. He got into just eight games for the Yankees in 1943 but he did get his first and only World Series ring that year, even though he didn’t get to play a single out of that Fall Classic. Things changed for Grimes in 1944. The Yankees’ young and talented starting third baseman, Billy Johnson was called into military service and McCarthy began playing Grimes regularly at the hot corner. In one of his early starts there, he found out firsthand why the legendary Yankee skipper was so beloved by his players. Grimes had made three errors in the contest, pretty much single handedly costing New York the loss. While he was undressing in the clubhouse after the game, he saw McCarthy approaching him. He prepared himself for a tongue-lashing but instead, the manager put his hand on Grimes shoulder and told him about a horrible fielding day he himself had had in the minors.

Grimes played 116 games and had a career high .279 during that ’44 season. In 1945, he played 142 games for New York and had a stellar on base percentage of .395. But Grimes achilles heel were his iron hands. He was simply not a very good defensive infielder and when Johnson and all the other Yankee third base prospects returned from service, Grimes days in pinstripes were numbered. That number came up on July 11th of the 1946 season when New York sold him to the Philadelphia A’s. He became the A’s starting second baseman and didn’t do to badly with his bat, hitting .262 during his half season in Philadelphia. But his defense just wasn’t good enough to keep him in the post war big leagues and he spent the next five seasons playing minor league ball, finally retiring for good in 1950, at the age of 35.

Grimes shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this long-ago Highlander shortstop.

Year Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1943 NYY AL 9 24 20 4 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 7 .150 .261 .150 .411
1944 NYY AL 116 456 387 44 108 17 8 5 46 6 0 59 57 .279 .377 .403 .780
1945 NYY AL 142 595 480 64 127 19 7 4 45 7 6 97 73 .265 .395 .358 .753
1946 TOT AL 73 271 230 29 58 6 0 1 24 2 1 28 36 .252 .336 .291 .627
1946 NYY AL 14 41 39 1 8 1 0 0 4 0 1 1 7 .205 .225 .231 .456
9 Yrs 602 2193 1832 235 469 73 24 18 200 30 12 297 303 .256 .363 .352 .715
CLE (5 yrs) 262 847 715 94 173 31 9 8 84 15 5 110 130 .242 .345 .344 .689
NYY (4 yrs) 281 1116 926 113 246 37 15 9 96 13 7 160 144 .266 .378 .367 .746
PHA (1 yr) 59 230 191 28 50 5 0 1 20 2 0 27 29 .262 .356 .304 .660
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/12/2013.

March 15 – Happy Birthday Kevin Youklis

youklisIf you love the Yankees, you hate, or at the very least dislike the Red Sox. But if you love the Yankees, you also find it easy to root for guys who at one time used to be Red Sox but now have landed in the Bronx and wear the pinstripes. If somebody told me in the late 1980s that I’d one day be praying Wade Boggs would drive in a runner from third or that Roger Clemens would strike out the sides, I’d have thought they were looney. Same goes for Johnny Damon fifteen years later. And more recently, it was Kevin Youklis.

When he was with Boston, I hated seeing “The Greek God of Walks” stride up to the plate in a close Red Sox/Yankee game. I knew at the very least he’d get into that completely weird batting stance of his and put together a very good at bat, forcing whatever Yankee pitcher happened to to be on the mound at the time to throw at least a dozen pitches. It seemed as if more often than not, those Youklis at bats would end up with him driving in a huge run or he would at least get on base and put himself in position to score that run. I did not like this guy at all and then in December of 2013, he signed as a free agent with the Yankees, forcing me to root for him too.

The problem with the signing was that it had been about four years since big Kevin had a good season. During his last two plus years in Boston, injuries and Bobby Valentine disrupted his game and he hit just .236 after getting traded to the White Sox in June of 2012. The only reason the Yankees came calling last winter and agreed to pay him $12 million was because A-Rod’s hip went bad. At the time of his signing, New York was hoping they’d only need him to start at the hot corner till Rodriguez recovered and returned at mid-year. With sluggers like Teixeira and Granderson still in the powerful Yankee lineup, they could even afford to absorb the mediocre bat Youklis had swung the previous few years. Joe Girardi just needed him to provide decent defense at third, use that great eye of his to earn frequent “walks” to first base and most importantly, stay healthy.

After his first regular season month in Pinstripes, Youklis was on the DL. By the middle of June both his season and his Yankee career were over, forcing Yankee fans to once again look forward to getting A-Rod back on the field sooner rather than later. In 2014, Youklis is playing in Japan.

He shares his birthday with this former Yankee outfielder, this long-ago first baseman and this one-time Yankee third baseman.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2013 NYY 28 118 105 12 23 7 0 2 8 0 8 31 .219 .305 .343 .648
10 Yrs 1061 4436 3749 653 1053 254 18 150 618 26 539 828 .281 .382 .478 .861
BOS (9 yrs) 953 3974 3352 594 961 239 17 133 564 26 494 728 .287 .388 .487 .875
NYY (1 yr) 28 118 105 12 23 7 0 2 8 0 8 31 .219 .305 .343 .648
CHW (1 yr) 80 344 292 47 69 8 1 15 46 0 37 69 .236 .346 .425 .771
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/8/2014.

March 13 – Happy Birthday Frank Baker

George Steinbrenner was not the first Yankee owner of German extraction who liked to wheel and deal his way to a pennant. That honor belonged to millionaire brewer, Jacob Rupert, who purchased the New York AL franchise in 1914. He considered every day his baseball team made the headlines as free advertisement for his beer and since the teams that made it to the World Series got the most headlines, old Jake was determined to turn the Yankees into winners as quickly as possible.

His first big move in that direction was the acquisition of Baseball’s first famous slugger. Frank Baker’s nickname was “”Home Run””. He had led the American League in home runs four straight times as a Philadelphia Athletic from 1911 through 1914, during which he hit 11, 10, 12 and 9 round trippers, respectively. He then got into a contract dispute with Connie Mack and sat out the 1915 season. The Hall of Famer spent the last six of his thirteen-year big league career with New York and hit half of his 96 career round trippers as a Yankee. When he retired for good in 1922, he had helped New York make it to the franchise’s first two World Series.

Baker shares a birthday with this hero of the Yankees 1996 season and also with the last Yankee to ever wear uniform number “3.”

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1916 NYY 100 402 360 46 97 23 2 10 52 15 36 30 .269 .344 .428 .772
1917 NYY 146 613 553 57 156 24 2 6 71 18 48 27 .282 .345 .365 .710
1918 NYY 126 558 504 65 154 24 5 6 62 8 38 13 .306 .357 .409 .765
1919 NYY 141 623 567 70 166 22 1 10 83 13 44 18 .293 .346 .388 .734
1921 NYY 94 369 330 46 97 16 2 9 71 8 26 12 .294 .353 .436 .789
1922 NYY 69 258 234 30 65 12 3 7 36 1 15 14 .278 .327 .444 .771
13 Yrs 1575 6666 5984 887 1838 315 103 96 987 235 473 346 .307 .363 .442 .805
PHA (7 yrs) 899 3843 3436 573 1103 194 88 48 612 172 266 232 .321 .375 .471 .845
NYY (6 yrs) 676 2823 2548 314 735 121 15 48 375 63 207 114 .288 .347 .404 .751
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/7/2014.

January 11 – Happy Birthday Loren Babe

Thumbnail image for loren-babe-1953-yankees-2.jpgThe Yankees have three “Babes” that I know of on their all-time roster. The first and most famous, of course, was Babe Ruth. Then there was Babe Dahlgren, the guy who replaced the legendary Lou Gehrig as the Yankees’ starting first baseman, in 1939. The third Yankee “Babe” was Loren Babe, who’s birthday we celebrate today. Unfortunately for him, he didn’t resemble the original Babe when he was trying to hit big league pitching but if you put a Dodger hat on the guy pictured on the left, you could easily have mistaken him for the great Sandy Koufax.

Loren Babe had the misfortune of being a 24-year-old third base prospect when the Yankees already had a young Gil McDougald and Andy Carey on their big league roster. Born in Pisgah, IA, on January 11, 1928, Mr. Babe got into 17 games as a Yankee during the 1952 and  beginning part of the ’53 seasons. Loren’s bat did play a very significant role in Yankee history. I read Jane Leavy’s book about Mickey Mantle, entitled The Last Boy. It contains the most detailed account I’ve ever read of Mickey’s historic home run off of the Senators’ Chuck Stobbs in Washington’s Griffith Stadium, on April 17, 1953 (See illustrative photo below-not a photo of actual home run.) When Mantle hit that monster he was using a bat he borrowed from a teammate. That teammate was Loren Babe. Nine days later, the Yankees sold Babe to the Athletics but Mickey kept his bat.

That missing bat may or may not help explain why Loren hit just .224 in 103 games for Philly and ended up back in the Minors and eventually, back in the Yankee organization. He then went into managing, scouting and coaching. He was on the Yankees’ big league coaching staff in 1967. He was diagnosed with colon cancer in 1983 while working for the White Sox organization. Needing just eight weeks more of employment to qualify for MLB pension benefits, Chicago put Babe on their coaching staff after Charley Lau, who was serving as the team’s hitting coach, graciously offered to step aside. In a tragic and ironic twist, Lau was also diagnosed with cancer and died just five weeks after the disease took Babe’s life.

Babe shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher.

Mantle.TapeMeasure.jpg

Loren Babe’s Yankee regular season and MLB lifetime statistics.
Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1952 NYY 12 25 21 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 4 4 .095 .240 .143 .383
1953 NYY 5 18 18 2 6 1 0 2 6 0 0 2 .333 .333 .722 1.056
2 Yrs 120 426 382 37 85 18 2 2 26 1 39 26 .223 .298 .296 .594
NYY (2 yrs) 17 43 39 3 8 2 0 2 6 1 4 6 .205 .279 .410 .689
PHA (1 yr) 103 383 343 34 77 16 2 0 20 0 35 20 .224 .300 .283 .583
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/11/2014.