Results tagged ‘ starting pitcher ’

March 24 – Happy Birthday Chad Gaudin

Talk about a lousy birthday present, New York announced they were releasing this right-hander on his 27th birthday. He had been competing in Spring Training for the fifth starter’s spot in Manager Joe Girardi’s 2010 rotation but was beaten out by Phil Hughes. If the Yankees kept him on the roster and put him in the bullpen, they would have had to pay his full $2.7 million salary so they released him instead. Gaudin landed a job on the A’s staff a few days later but when Oakland released him in May of 2010, he again joined the Yankee bullpen. He originally had impressed me during his first 11 appearances in pinstripes in 2009 but he did little for New York upon his return in 2010. He pitched a bit for the Washington Nationals in 2011 and then caught on with the Marlins in 2012, followed up by a strong season out of the Giants’ bullpen in 2013. The Phillies brought him to their 2014 spring training camp but he was cut from their roster early on.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2009 NYY 2 0 1.000 3.43 11 6 4 0 0 0 42.0 41 16 16 7 20 34 1.452
2010 NYY 1 2 .333 4.50 30 0 17 0 0 0 48.0 46 27 24 11 20 33 1.375
11 Yrs 45 44 .506 4.44 344 87 80 1 0 2 836.1 859 459 413 92 382 673 1.484
OAK (4 yrs) 20 20 .500 4.25 127 40 28 1 0 2 343.1 346 179 162 35 164 254 1.485
TBD (2 yrs) 3 2 .600 4.25 41 7 10 0 0 0 82.2 96 45 39 8 32 53 1.548
NYY (2 yrs) 3 2 .600 4.00 41 6 21 0 0 0 90.0 87 43 40 18 40 67 1.411
SDP (1 yr) 4 10 .286 5.13 20 19 0 0 0 0 105.1 105 69 60 7 56 105 1.528
WSN (1 yr) 1 1 .500 6.48 10 0 1 0 0 0 8.1 12 10 6 1 8 10 2.400
CHC (1 yr) 4 2 .667 6.26 24 0 5 0 0 0 27.1 29 21 19 5 10 27 1.427
SFG (1 yr) 5 2 .714 3.06 30 12 4 0 0 0 97.0 81 34 33 6 40 88 1.247
MIA (1 yr) 4 2 .667 4.54 46 0 11 0 0 0 69.1 72 39 35 6 26 57 1.413
TOR (1 yr) 1 3 .250 13.15 5 3 0 0 0 0 13.0 31 19 19 6 6 12 2.846
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/13/2014.

January 13 – Happy Birthday Darrell Rasner

Yankee fans do not have fond memories of the 2008 season. It was Joe Girardi’s first year at the helm and the team went into the regular season betting heavily that Phil Hughes, Joba Chamberlain and Ian Kennedy were going to provide at least two fifths of New York’s starting rotation, with Andy Pettitte, Chien-Ming Wang and Mike Mussina. Not only did the three youngsters fail miserably, Wang ruined his season with a freak base-running accident and Pettitte had a sub-par year going 14-14. Only 20-game winner Mike Mussina delivered better than expected results and by the end of the season, the Yankees found themselves out of the race for a postseason berth.

Besides Mussina, the only good story among the Yankees’ 2008 menagerie of starters was the jolt provided by Darrell Rasner when Gerardi inserted the Nevada-born right-hander into the rotation in early May. Rasner had broken into the big leagues in 2005 with the Nationals. The Yankees got him off waivers just before their 2006 spring training camp opened. In ’06 and ’07 he had bounced back and forth between New York and just about every farm team in the organization. When he got off to a great start in Scranton in 2008, he was called up and thrust into a starting role. He then proceeded to win his first three starts for New York and suddenly the pundits were wondering if it might be Rasner instead of Joba, Hughes or Kennedy who would actually solidify the Yankee rotation. That expectations balloon burst when he went on to lose ten of his last twelve decisions, but for that brief three-week stretch in May, he captured the attention and felt the admiration of Yankee fans.

When the 2008 season ended, Rasner faced a big decision. The Yankees were interested in re-signing him but his agent got him a bigger offer to play in Japan. The difference in dollars was at least a million bucks. He loved pitching in New York and he had lots of apprehension about playing and living in Japan. But his wife was expecting the couple’s second child and the then 28-year-old Rasner knew the money he could make in Japan would help him solidify his growing family’s future so he made the move. After a rough first couple of years as a starter for the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Japan’s Pacific League, Rasner was converted to a reliever and he’s become very good in that role. He registered 17 saves for the Eagles in 2013. If the name of his Japanese team sounds a bit familiar to Yankee fans, its because Rasner has been Masahiro Tanaka’s teammate for the past five seasons. The Yankees are about to offer the moon to Tanaka to make him part of their starting rotation in 2014.

Rasner shares his birthday with this not-well-remembered Yankee shortstop.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2006 NYY 3 1 .750 4.43 6 3 1 0 0 0 20.1 18 10 10 2 5 11 1.131
2007 NYY 1 3 .250 4.01 6 6 0 0 0 0 24.2 29 14 11 4 8 11 1.500
2008 NYY 5 10 .333 5.40 24 20 1 0 0 0 113.1 135 74 68 14 39 67 1.535
4 Yrs 9 15 .375 5.00 41 30 3 0 0 0 165.2 187 101 92 20 54 93 1.455
NYY (3 yrs) 9 14 .391 5.06 36 29 2 0 0 0 158.1 182 98 89 20 52 89 1.478
WSN (1 yr) 0 1 .000 3.68 5 1 1 0 0 0 7.1 5 3 3 0 2 4 0.955
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/13/2014.

January 8 – Happy Birthday Carl Pavano

His December, 2004 free agent signing turned out to be one of the worst moves in Yankee front-office history. After paying him $40 million to pitch the next four seasons, the right hander left New York at the conclusion of that contract, having appeared in just 26 games in pinstripes with a 9-8 won-loss record. That equates to more than $1.5 million per start or a bit more than $4 million per victory. Rubbing just a bit more salt in the Yankee’s wounds, Pavano then won 31 times in his first two post Yankee seasons, including a 17-11 record with the Twins in 2010 that had Brian Cashman even considering bringing the guy back to the Bronx in 2011.

That didn’t happen. Pavano ended up signing a new $17 million two-year deal to remain with Minnesota. Turns out Cashman and New York avoided another bad deal.  He was a combined 11-18 for the Twins during the two years covered by that contract and his 2012 season was limited to just 11 starts by a shoulder injury that required surgical repair. Then in January of 2013, Pavano slipped and fell while shoveling the driveway of his home in Vermont and ruptured his spleen. He was contemplating a comeback at the time of that mishap but it looks as if his pitching career is now over.

Pavano was born on this date in 1976. This former Yankee who led New York in RBIs four different times, also celebrates a birthday today as does this one-time Yankee reliever.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2005 NYY 4 6 .400 4.77 17 17 0 1 1 0 100.0 129 66 53 17 18 56 1.470
2007 NYY 1 0 1.000 4.76 2 2 0 0 0 0 11.1 12 7 6 1 2 4 1.235
2008 NYY 4 2 .667 5.77 7 7 0 0 0 0 34.1 41 23 22 5 10 15 1.485
14 Yrs 108 107 .502 4.39 302 284 3 17 8 0 1788.2 1971 955 873 200 425 1091 1.340
MON (5 yrs) 24 35 .407 4.83 81 78 0 1 1 0 452.2 493 264 243 55 159 304 1.440
MIN (4 yrs) 33 33 .500 4.32 88 88 0 10 3 0 579.2 654 303 278 63 101 311 1.302
NYY (3 yrs) 9 8 .529 5.00 26 26 0 1 1 0 145.2 182 96 81 23 30 75 1.455
FLA (3 yrs) 33 23 .589 3.64 86 71 3 4 2 0 485.0 492 212 196 40 112 313 1.245
CLE (1 yr) 9 8 .529 5.37 21 21 0 1 1 0 125.2 150 80 75 19 23 88 1.377
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/8/2014.

January 6 – Happy Birthday Joe Lake

LakeThis Brooklyn born right hander took 27 years to make his big league debut with the New York Highlanders and unfortunately, it happened during the worst season in the franchise’s history. Joe Lake had caught everyone’s attention when in his first-ever season of minor league ball in 1907, he won 25 games for the Eastern League’s Jersey City Skeeters. That same year’s Highlander team had finished with a mediocre 70-78 record. New York’s manager, Clark Griffith knew he had to find some younger arms because his top two starters, 33-year-old Jack Chesbro and 34-year-old Al Orth were both getting a bit long in the tooth. He had received a scouting report praising a hard-throwing young right-hander named Walter Johnson, but the kid had only pitched on sandlots and for company-sponsored semi-pro teams. This lack of experience caused Griffith to hesitate reaching out to Johnson and by the time he did, the Senators had already signed the future Hall of Famer.

So the Highlanders went and got today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant instead and Griffith put him in his 1908 starting rotation. It looked like a genius move when both Lake and the team got off to a quick start that season. New York was actually on top of the AL standings with a 20-15 record on June 1st. They then lost 12 of their next 16 games and after arguing with the front-office over the team’s reversal of fortune, a frustrated Griffith was let go and replaced by Yankee starting shortstop, Kid Elberfield. The “Tabasco Kid” proved to be a much better player than he was a manager. He skippered the team to a dismal 27-71 record and a last-place finish. Every Highlander starter ended the year with a losing record including Lake, who at 9-22 led the league in losses.

Still, when the team’s 1909 spring training camp opened, new manager George Stallings told the New York press that Lake figured prominently in his pitching plans for the upcoming season. It was a wise move on the part of Stallings. Lake already had a decent fastball and Chesbro had helped him improve his knuckleball. The second-year hurler used both pitches efficiently enough to fashion a noteworthy 14-11 record in ’09 with an outstanding ERA of just 1.88. But instead of keeping Lake, the Highlanders traded him to the Browns in December of that year for a 37-year-old veteran catcher named Lou Criger, who would end up hitting just .188 for New York in 1910.

Lake went on to do some very good pitching for some very bad St. Louis ballclubs the next two seasons before ending his big league career as a Tiger in 1913. He shares his January 6th birthday with this former Yankee starting pitcherthis one-time Yankee shortstopthis former 20-game-winning pitcher and this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1908 NYY 9 22 .290 3.17 38 27 11 19 2 0 269.1 252 157 95 6 77 118 1.222
1909 NYY 14 11 .560 1.88 31 26 5 17 3 1 215.1 180 81 45 2 59 117 1.110
6 Yrs 62 90 .408 2.85 199 139 53 95 8 5 1318.0 1329 671 417 19 332 594 1.260
SLB (3 yrs) 22 39 .361 2.88 76 60 15 42 3 2 533.2 558 272 171 5 133 238 1.295
NYY (2 yrs) 23 33 .411 2.60 69 53 16 36 5 1 484.2 432 238 140 8 136 235 1.172
DET (2 yrs) 17 18 .486 3.18 54 26 22 17 0 2 299.2 339 161 106 6 63 121 1.341
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/6/2014.

January 2 – Happy Birthday David Cone

“Conie” joined the Yankees in 1995 and helped them reach postseason play in each of the six years he wore the pinstripes. A five-time All Star (twice as a Yankee), David had two 20-victory seasons during his 17 years in the big leagues and posted 21 shutouts. The year before he became a Yankee, he had been voted the AL Cy Young award-winner for his 16-5 season with the Royals. The Royals then traded him to the Blue Jays and Toronto traded him to New York after the 1995 All Star break for three Yankee prospects. Cone finished with a 64-40 record as a Yankee and 194-126 lifetime. His best year in New York was his 20-7 season in 1998. His absolute greatest moment in pinstripes occurred on July 18, 1999, when he pitched a perfect game against the Montreal Expos. Does anyone out there remember who made the last out of that game for the Expos? It was Expo shortstop Orlando Cabrera whose popup was caught in foul territory by Yankee third baseman, Scott Brosius.

Mr. Cone won a total of five World Series rings including four with the Yankees plus one with the Blue Jays in 1993. The right-hander had an overall 8-3 record in the postseason including his six wins and a loss in pinstriped fall ball.

Cone now is an analyst on Yes Network broadcasts of Yankee games. I like him in that role. When Jorge Posada was struggling with his reduced role with the 2011 Yankees, Cone talked about his own personal fight with the fact he could no longer play the game. His final Yankee season in 2000 had been the worst of his seventeen-year big league career, finishing with a 4-14 record and an ERA near seven. When the Yankees did not try to re-sign him, Cone signed with the Red Sox for $1 million and started for Boston during the 2001 season. He actually pitched pretty well for the Yankees’ arch-rivals, finishing the year with a 9-7 record. His best start of that season took place on the second day of September at Fenway Park against his old New York teammates in a classic pitchers’ duel between him and Mike Mussina.  I remember watching every pitch of that game. Cone was brilliant for eight innings, striking out eight and holding New York scoreless until Enrique Wilson’s ground ball double scored Tino Martinez with one out in the top of the ninth. Mussina was even better, pitching a perfect game until Carl Everett, pinch-hitting for Red Sox catcher Bob Oliver singled with two outs in the ninth. Mussina won the game 1-0 but Cone proved once again that he was a warrior on the mound.

I thought he was gone for good after that season but he reappeared two years later in a Met uniform and won his first start of the 2003 season for the Amazin’s. But then he got hammered in his next three and finally called it quits for good. During that 2011 discussion about Posada coming to terms with the end of his playing career, Cone admitted he wished he had retired after his final year in pinstripes.

Also born on this date was this Yankee middle reliever who led the AL in appearances in 2006.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1995 NYY 9 2 .818 3.82 13 13 0 1 0 0 99.0 82 42 42 12 47 89 1.303
1996 NYY 7 2 .778 2.88 11 11 0 1 0 0 72.0 50 25 23 3 34 71 1.167
1997 NYY 12 6 .667 2.82 29 29 0 1 0 0 195.0 155 67 61 17 86 222 1.236
1998 NYY 20 7 .741 3.55 31 31 0 3 0 0 207.2 186 89 82 20 59 209 1.180
1999 NYY 12 9 .571 3.44 31 31 0 1 1 0 193.1 164 84 74 21 90 177 1.314
2000 NYY 4 14 .222 6.91 30 29 0 0 0 0 155.0 192 124 119 25 82 120 1.768
17 Yrs 194 126 .606 3.46 450 419 9 56 22 1 2898.2 2504 1222 1115 258 1137 2668 1.256
NYM (7 yrs) 81 51 .614 3.13 187 169 4 34 15 1 1209.1 1011 472 421 91 431 1172 1.192
NYY (6 yrs) 64 40 .615 3.91 145 144 0 7 1 0 922.0 829 431 401 98 398 888 1.331
KCR (3 yrs) 27 19 .587 3.29 68 57 5 10 4 0 448.1 364 176 164 37 181 344 1.216
TOR (2 yrs) 13 9 .591 3.14 25 24 0 5 2 0 183.1 152 69 64 15 70 149 1.211
BOS (1 yr) 9 7 .563 4.31 25 25 0 0 0 0 135.2 148 74 65 17 57 115 1.511
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/2/2014.