Results tagged ‘ starting pitcher ’

May 7 – Happy Birthday Tom Zachary

TomZachary.jpgThis guy will forever be best known as the pitcher who gave up Babe Ruth’s sixtieth home run during the 1927 season. That happened when Zachary was wearing the uniform of the Washington Senators. The left-hander had been originally signed by Washington but had made his big league debut in 1919 as a member of Connie Mack’s Philadelphia A’s pitching staff. The Senators got him back in a trade the following year and Zachary evolved into one of the AL’s upper tier southpaws, winning in double digits for six straight seasons. His best year had been 1924, when his 15-9 record helped the Senators win the Pennant. He then beat the Giants twice in that season’s World Series.

In August of 1928, the Yankees picked him up off waivers. He went 3-3 during the rest of that season. Yankee skipper, Miller Huggins, most likely remembering Zachary’s 1924 postseason success, got a hunch to start him against the Cardinals in Game 3 of the 1928 World Series. That hunch paid off when the Graham, NC native responded with a complete game victory.

In 1929, Zachary went a perfect 12-0, but that performance was overshadowed by the tragic death of Huggins and the Yankee’s failure to defend their AL Pennant. After getting off to a slow start during the 1930 season, the Yankees placed the then-34-year-old pitcher on waivers and  he was picked up by the Braves. He ended up pitching six more years of big league baseball, retiring after the 1936 season with a 186-191 lifetime record.

Also born on this date was this former Yankee outfielder and this almost Yankee manager.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO HBP WHIP
1928 NYY 3 3 .500 3.94 7 6 1 3 0 1 45.2 54 26 20 0 15 7 0 1.511
1929 NYY 12 0 1.000 2.48 26 11 9 7 2 2 119.2 131 43 33 5 30 35 2 1.345
1930 NYY 1 1 .500 6.48 3 3 0 0 0 0 16.2 18 16 12 0 9 1 0 1.620
19 Yrs 186 191 .493 3.73 533 408 84 186 24 22 3126.1 3580 1551 1295 118 914 720 41 1.437
WSH (9 yrs) 96 103 .482 3.78 273 210 45 93 10 8 1589.0 1822 803 668 54 460 327 26 1.436
BSN (5 yrs) 42 42 .500 3.48 120 98 11 46 8 4 741.1 827 333 287 24 201 214 3 1.387
BRO (3 yrs) 12 18 .400 3.98 48 33 12 13 1 6 260.0 317 131 115 15 57 61 4 1.438
NYY (3 yrs) 16 4 .800 3.21 36 20 10 10 2 3 182.0 203 85 65 5 54 43 2 1.412
SLB (2 yrs) 18 21 .462 3.79 47 43 4 24 3 0 325.2 374 174 137 18 124 66 6 1.529
PHI (1 yr) 0 3 .000 7.97 7 2 2 0 0 1 20.1 28 20 18 2 11 8 0 1.918
PHA (1 yr) 2 0 1.000 5.63 2 2 0 0 0 0 8.0 9 5 5 0 7 1 0 2.000
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/7/2013.

April 26 – Happy Birthday Ray Caldwell

caldwellRay Caldwell was one of the most interesting Yankees to ever play the game. Born on this date in 1888, in a northwestern Pennsylvania town that now lies under water, Caldwell was working as a telegrapher, when he received an offer to pitch for a C-level minor league ball club in McKeesport, PA. He won 18 games for that team in his professional debut and the next year he was pitching for the New York Yankees.

According to baseball historians, this guy was one of the biggest playboys in the history of the game and one of its heaviest drinkers too. He was also a brilliant pitcher, so good that Washington Senator manager Cal Griffith once offered the Yankees the great Walter Johnson for Caldwell even up.

A tall, slender right-hander, his best seasons for New York were 1914, when he went 18-9 with a 1.94 ERA and the following year, when he won a career high 19 games. He also happened to be one of baseball’s best hitting pitchers and frequently played the outfield on days he wasn’t on the mound.

But whenever it looked as if Caldwell was about to achieve greatness, he went on one of his hard-partying binges, often leaving the ball club for days on end and then suddenly reappearing to accept whatever punishment was thrown at him. His erratic behavior drove all his Yankee managers crazy, especially Frank Chance, who  levied close to a thousand dollars worth of fines against his care-free pitcher during the 1914 season. When Caldwell was openly considering jumping to the upstart Federal League, however, Yankee owner Frank Farrell forgave the fines, causing Chance to quit.

When Miller Huggins took over the Yankees, he tried hiring detectives to keep tabs on Caldwell but the pitcher learned how to lose them. Tired of the nonsense, Huggins traded him to the Red Sox after the 1918 season. After half a year with Boston he was dealt to Cleveland, where he had a temporary but glorious rebirth. During the next season and a half he went 25-11 for the Indians and helped get them to the 1920 World Series, which the Tribe won in seven games. After slumping to 6-6 the following year, Caldwell’s big league days were over, but not his pitching career. Somehow, this guy pitched in the minors for 11 more seasons, finally hanging his glove up for good, in 1933, at the age of 45.

As you might expect, Caldwell’s private life was also pretty chaotic. He got married four times and held all kinds of jobs. He lived to be 79 years old, passing away in 1967.

He shares his April 26th birthday with this Yankee relieverthis former Yankee pitcher who gained most of his fame pitching for another team and this one too.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1910 NYY 1 0 1.000 3.72 6 2 2 1 0 1 19.1 19 8 8 1 9 17 1.448
1911 NYY 14 14 .500 3.35 41 26 13 19 1 1 255.0 240 115 95 7 79 145 1.251
1912 NYY 8 16 .333 4.47 30 26 3 13 3 0 183.1 196 111 91 1 67 95 1.435
1913 NYY 9 8 .529 2.41 27 16 9 15 2 1 164.1 131 59 44 5 60 87 1.162
1914 NYY 18 9 .667 1.94 31 23 7 22 5 0 213.0 153 53 46 5 51 92 0.958
1915 NYY 19 16 .543 2.89 36 35 1 31 3 0 305.0 266 115 98 6 107 130 1.223
1916 NYY 5 12 .294 2.99 21 18 1 14 1 0 165.2 142 62 55 6 65 76 1.249
1917 NYY 13 16 .448 2.86 32 29 3 21 1 0 236.0 199 92 75 8 76 102 1.165
1918 NYY 9 8 .529 3.06 24 21 3 14 1 1 176.2 173 69 60 2 62 59 1.330
12 Yrs 134 120 .528 3.22 343 259 65 184 21 8 2242.0 2089 972 802 59 738 1006 1.261
NYY (9 yrs) 96 99 .492 3.00 248 196 42 150 17 4 1718.1 1519 684 572 41 576 803 1.219
CLE (3 yrs) 31 17 .646 3.95 77 51 18 28 3 4 437.1 478 239 192 17 131 180 1.393
BOS (1 yr) 7 4 .636 3.96 18 12 5 6 1 0 86.1 92 49 38 1 31 23 1.425
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/25/2014.

April 25 – Happy Birthday “?” Ford

Russ.Ford.jpgThe last name of today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant is Ford. He was a two-time twenty game winner as a starter for the Yankee franchise and he was famous for scuffing the baseball with a tiny piece of sandpaper. He admitted to that doctoring after his playing days were over. What was this pitcher’s first name?

You’re wrong if you guessed Whitey. You’re also wrong if you guessed Edward, which was the real first name of one-time Yankee ace Whitey Ford. Whitey was also a two-time twenty-game winner for New York and after he retired in 1967, he also admitted to doctoring the baseball with a small strip of sandpaper attached to his wedding ring. But Whitey Ford wasn’t born on April 25th.

Today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant is instead, “Russ” Ford, who was born in Canada on April 25, 1883. He was a right handed pitcher for the New York Highlanders from 1909 until he jumped to the Federal League in 1914. This Ford won 26 games for New York in 1910 and then 22 the following year. According to his New York Times obituary, he invented the “Emory ball” by accident when one of his warm up pitches went flying by the catcher and bounced off a grating. When he got that ball back in his glove, he noticed a scuff mark. He then noticed that every pitch he threw with that scuffed baseball moved much more sharply than even his spitball did. That’s when Ford began concealing and carrying sandpaper with him to the mound.

After his two straight 20-win seasons, Ford lost 21 games for the 1912 Highlanders and then went 12-18 for the 1913 team that by then had officially changed its name to the New York Yankees. Those two bad years helped make Ford’s jump to the upstart Federal League in 1914 much easier for the Yankees to swallow. In fact, when AL President Ban Johnson offered to go to court to protect the Yankee’s contractual rights to the pitcher, Frank Chance, the New York Manager at the time told Johnson not to even bother.

This former Yankee reliever and this Cuban defector also celebrate their birthdays on April 25th.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB IBB SO WHIP
1909 NYY 0 0 9.00 1 0 1 0 0 0 3.0 4 4 3 0 4 2 2.667
1910 NYY 26 6 .813 1.65 36 33 3 29 8 1 299.2 194 69 55 4 70 209 0.881
1911 NYY 22 11 .667 2.27 37 33 4 26 1 0 281.1 251 119 71 3 76 158 1.162
1912 NYY 13 21 .382 3.55 36 35 1 30 0 0 291.2 317 165 115 11 79 112 1.358
1913 NYY 12 18 .400 2.66 33 28 5 15 1 2 237.0 244 101 70 9 58 72 1.274
7 Yrs 99 71 .582 2.59 199 170 28 126 15 9 1487.1 1340 595 428 45 376 710 1.154
NYY (5 yrs) 73 56 .566 2.54 143 129 14 100 10 3 1112.2 1010 458 314 27 287 553 1.166
BUF (2 yrs) 26 15 .634 2.74 56 41 14 26 5 6 374.2 330 137 114 18 89 157 1.118
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/24/2013.