Results tagged ‘ starting pitcher ’

July 1 – Happy Birthday Jack Quinn

The July 1st Pinstripe Birthday celebrant was no stranger to controversy. When Major League Baseball abolished the spit ball just before the 1919 season got under way, exemptions were granted that permitted eighteen pitchers to continue throwing the wet one until the end of their careers. Jack Quinn was one of those 18 pitchers and at the time he was granted the exemption, he was already 36 years old and had pitched four seasons of ball with the Highlanders, one with the Braves and two more in the upstart Federal League. When his Federal League franchise folded, Quinn played in the Pacific Coast League for three seasons until the PCL halted play during the 1918 season due to America’s participation in WWI.  Quinn then signed a contract to pitch for the White Sox and finished that year by winning 5 of 6 decisions for Chicago.

But the Yankees pulled a fast one on Chicago by purchasing Quinn’s contract from his former PCL team. When American League President Ban Johnson (along with his National league counterpart) ruled that New York did indeed have the rights to Quinn, the White Sox owner Charlie Comiskey, went ballistic. He had quarreled with Johnson numerous times before but losing Quinn caused Comiskey to attack Johnson’s honor repeatedly and threaten him in very public ways. Johnson was so angry at the White Sox owner that when Comiskey asked the AL President to investigate his early suspicions that his Chicago players were throwing the 1919 World Series, Johnson not only ignored him, he blamed the assertions on Comiskey being a sore loser. Many baseball researchers feel the League’s failure to follow up on Comiskey’s concerns permitted the infamous Black Sox scandal to play out and almost ruin baseball. So Jack Quinn ended up playing a huge role in baseball’s decision to create a Commissioner’s office.

In 1919, the already 35-year-old Quinn began the second phase of his Yankee career, spending his next three big league seasons pitching for New York and compiling a 51-31 record. The Yankees then traded him to Boston, where he won 46 more games as a Red Sox during the next four seasons. By then, Quinn was 41 years-old and still throwing a spitball pitch that had been outlawed for almost everyone else eight years previously. The Red Sox figured Quinn’s best days were behind him and put him on waivers in 1925. Connie Mack needed pitching so the A’s picked up Quinn and he won 69 names for Philadelphia over the next half-dozen seasons. If you’re keeping track, that brings us up to 1930, at which point this ageless right-hander was now 46 years-old. Quinn kept going, pitching until he was fifty years-old and accumulating a lifetime record of 247-218 with 57 saves. He also holds the distinction of being the oldest player (45 yrs old) in American League history to hit a home run. (Julio Franco (46yrs-old) now holds the big league record) When Quinn retired in 1943, only Burleigh Grimes was left as one of the 18 pitchers still throwing a “legal” spitball thanks to that 1918 exemption.

Quinn shares his July 1 birthday with this former Yankee outfielder and this former Yankee front-office executive.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1909 NYY 9 5 .643 1.97 23 11 12 8 0 1 118.2 110 45 26 1 24 36 1.129
1910 NYY 18 12 .600 2.37 35 31 4 20 0 0 235.2 214 88 62 2 58 82 1.154
1911 NYY 8 10 .444 3.76 40 16 19 7 0 2 174.2 203 111 73 2 41 71 1.397
1912 NYY 5 7 .417 5.79 18 11 4 7 0 0 102.2 139 89 66 4 23 47 1.578
1919 NYY 15 14 .517 2.61 38 31 6 18 4 0 266.0 242 96 77 8 65 97 1.154
1920 NYY 18 10 .643 3.20 41 32 9 17 2 3 253.1 271 110 90 8 48 101 1.259
1921 NYY 8 7 .533 3.78 33 13 7 6 0 0 119.0 158 61 50 2 32 44 1.597
23 Yrs 247 218 .531 3.29 756 443 217 243 28 57 3920.1 4238 1837 1433 103 860 1329 1.300
NYY (7 yrs) 81 65 .555 3.15 228 145 61 83 6 6 1270.0 1337 600 444 27 291 478 1.282
PHA (6 yrs) 69 47 .595 3.51 184 112 39 48 10 11 926.2 1051 442 361 33 184 232 1.333
BOS (4 yrs) 45 54 .455 3.65 145 100 30 53 7 14 832.2 946 421 338 28 190 226 1.364
BRO (2 yrs) 8 11 .421 3.03 81 1 60 0 0 23 151.2 167 64 51 2 48 53 1.418
BAL (2 yrs) 35 36 .493 2.98 90 73 16 48 4 2 616.1 624 266 204 12 128 282 1.220
BSN (1 yr) 4 3 .571 2.40 8 7 1 6 1 0 56.1 55 22 15 1 7 33 1.101
CIN (1 yr) 0 1 .000 4.02 14 0 9 0 0 1 15.2 20 9 7 0 5 3 1.596
CHW (1 yr) 5 1 .833 2.29 6 5 1 5 0 0 51.0 38 13 13 0 7 22 0.882
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/1/2013.

June 25 – Happy Birthday Bob Shirley

Most Yankee fans around my age can clearly remember the famous shower-room scuffle between Goose Gossage and Cliff Johnson in 1979 but how many of you can recall a similar incident between Don Mattingly and today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant that took place eight years later, during the 1987 season? At the time, the southpaw Shirley was in his fifth year as a Yankee pitcher. He had been signed by New York as a free agent after the 1982 season and went 5-8 as a member of Billy Martin’s starting rotation in ’83. After that inauspicious beginning, he was demoted to the bullpen and became the Yankees’ primary left-handed long reliever. He thrived in that role for the next two seasons and had his best year in pinstripes in ’85 when he appeared in 48 games and posted a career-low ERA of 2.64. He then had a horrible year in 1986, going 0-4 with an ERA that exploded to over five runs for every nine innings he pitched. So Shirley was already on pretty thin ice when according to published reports in June of 1987, he and Donnie Baseball engaged in a playful wrestling match in the visitors’ locker room of Milwaukee’s County Stadium, where the Yankees were playing a series against the Brewers. Mattingly ended up on the DL with two ruptured discs in his back. Though both players and their teammates denied the wrestling had taken place, George Steinbrenner was reportedly livid and ordered that Shirley be released the next day. Mattingly continued to insist that his former teammate was not the cause of his injury, explaining to reporters that Shirley was now looking for a job and he did not want other teams to think that the pitcher was some kind of locker room trouble maker.

Mattingly’s chronic back trouble would of course end up stunting the glorious start he had put together as a Yankee. Shirley would sign on with the Royals one week after being let go but pitched horribly during his only three appearances with Kansas City and was quickly released. He never again pitched in a big league game. He finished his 165-game Yankee career with a 14-20 record, 5 saves and a 4.05 ERA. Lifetime, he was 67-94 during his 11 big league seasons with 18 saves and a 3.82 ERA. Shirley shares his June 25th birthday with this former Yankee catcher. Besides George “Babe” Ruth and Shirley, can you think of any other Yankees who have a girl’s first name as their surname?

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1983 NYY 5 8 .385 5.08 25 17 3 1 1 0 108.0 122 71 61 10 36 53 1.463
1984 NYY 3 3 .500 3.38 41 7 11 1 0 0 114.1 119 47 43 8 38 48 1.373
1985 NYY 5 5 .500 2.64 48 8 9 2 0 2 109.0 103 34 32 5 26 55 1.183
1986 NYY 0 4 .000 5.04 39 6 9 0 0 3 105.1 108 60 59 13 40 64 1.405
1987 NYY 1 0 1.000 4.50 12 1 6 0 0 0 34.0 36 20 17 4 16 12 1.529
11 Yrs 67 94 .416 3.82 434 162 105 16 2 18 1432.0 1432 689 608 127 543 790 1.379
NYY (5 yrs) 14 20 .412 4.05 165 39 38 4 1 5 470.2 488 232 212 40 156 232 1.368
SDP (4 yrs) 39 57 .406 3.58 197 92 55 10 1 12 722.0 718 329 287 59 274 432 1.374
KCR (1 yr) 0 0 14.73 3 0 1 0 0 0 7.1 10 12 12 5 6 1 2.182
STL (1 yr) 6 4 .600 4.08 28 11 5 1 0 1 79.1 78 42 36 6 34 36 1.412
CIN (1 yr) 8 13 .381 3.60 41 20 6 1 0 0 152.2 138 74 61 17 73 89 1.382
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/25/2013.

June 24 – Happy Birthday Phil Hughes

Yankee fans are not known for their patience, especially with pitchers. We want strikes thrown, we want to hold leads and we want consistent performances game-to-game, season-to-season and especially in the postseason. Anything less than that and Yankee pitchers begin to see and hear Yankee fans express their dissatisfaction.

The team’s fans grow even more impatient when management touts young pitching prospects as ready-for-prime-time starting pitchers. That’s what happened to Ian Kennedy, Joba Chamberlain and also finally, today’s birthday boy, Phil Hughes. All three are now ex-Yankees and of the trio, it was Mr. Hughes who came closest to fulfilling the lofty expectations of New York’s front office and Yankee fans. But close only counts in horseshoes, not in the Bronx.

He originally showed us something in 2007, especially in the playoffs against Cleveland. He earned another reprieve after a very shaky start in 2008 and a rib injury that sidelined him for much of the year. Then in 2009, Hughes stepped up big when he was sent to the bullpen to become Mariano Rivera’s setup man. After a highly publicized spring training competition with Chamberlain for the 2010 fifth starter position, Hughes pitched as well as any starter in either league during the first half of 2010 season and made the All Star team. But even though he finished that year with an 18-8 record, he became a very ordinary pitcher in the second half and was once again ineffective in fall ball.

After failing to sign Cliff Lee and losing Andy Pettitte during the 2010 off season, the Yankees urgently needed Hughes to come out on fire in 2011. Instead, he was horrible. His confidence seemed to decrease in direct proportion to the lower and lower digital number readings on the radar gun aimed at Hughes’ fastballs. Finally, management put him on the DL and told us he had a dead arm. He did bounce back to win 16 games in 2012 and even pitched well in his first postseason start against Baltimore in that year’s ALCS. But in his next start against Detroit in Game 3 of the ALCS, Hughes complained of back stiffness in the third inning and he was taken out of the game.

Whatever the reason, physical, mental or mechanical, Hughes continued to be an enigma during what would be his final season as a Yankee in 2013 and actually regressed. He seemed to lose whatever ability he had to finish off good big league hitters on a consistent basis. Brian Cashman chose not to make him a qualifying offer after the season, afraid he’d accept the $14 million and make a bad situation in New York even worse and much more expensive. But “Hughesie” did land on his feet, signing a three-year $24 million deal to pitch for Minnesota. And through today’s date, the pitcher’s 28th birthday, the Twin Cities have proved very much to his liking. He’s currently 8-3 with his new team and I’m thrilled for him. He deserves the success.

Hughes shares his June 24th birthday with this former Yankee All Star catcher and this long-ago Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2007 NYY 5 3 .625 4.46 13 13 0 0 0 0 72.2 64 39 36 8 29 58 1.280
2008 NYY 0 4 .000 6.62 8 8 0 0 0 0 34.0 43 26 25 3 15 23 1.706
2009 NYY 8 3 .727 3.03 51 7 6 0 0 3 86.0 68 31 29 8 28 96 1.116
2010 ★ NYY 18 8 .692 4.19 31 29 0 0 0 0 176.1 162 83 82 25 58 146 1.248
2011 NYY 5 5 .500 5.79 17 14 1 1 1 0 74.2 84 48 48 9 27 47 1.487
2012 NYY 16 13 .552 4.19 32 32 0 1 0 0 191.1 196 101 89 35 46 165 1.265
2013 NYY 4 14 .222 5.19 30 29 0 0 0 0 145.2 170 91 84 24 42 121 1.455
8 Yrs 64 53 .547 4.41 197 147 7 3 1 3 876.0 886 456 429 119 254 738 1.301
NYY (7 yrs) 56 50 .528 4.53 182 132 7 2 1 3 780.2 787 419 393 112 245 656 1.322
MIN (1 yr) 8 3 .727 3.40 15 15 0 1 0 0 95.1 99 37 36 7 9 82 1.133
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/26/2014.