Results tagged ‘ shortstop ’

August 13 – Happy Birthday Fred Stanley

Bucky Dent’s historic home run against the Red Sox that just cleared the Green Monster in Fenway to give the Yankees the lead in the 1978 AL East Divison playoff was not the only dramatic blast hit by a Yankee shortstop in Beantown that season. Slightly over three months earlier, the two teams had met under much different circumstances. It was late June, and instead of being tied for first place, Boston then had a commanding seven game lead over the third place Bombers as the two teams squared off for a Tuesday evening game at Fenway. Billy Martin had not yet lost his job to Bob Lemon and the paranoid Yankee Manager was struggling to keep his drinking, his hatred of Reggie Jackson and his fear of being fired by George Steinbrenner all in check. The Yankees had already been pummeled by Boston the night before, losing the series opener 10-4. Dent had been injured in that game so Martin was starting Fred “The Chicken” Stanley at short in this second of what was a three-game series. Boston had Mike Torrez, the same right-hander Bucky Dent would victimize about 14 weeks later, on the mound.

Martin started Don Gullett. It was just the sixth start of the southpaw’s 1978 season. He had spent the first two months of that year on the DL.  Just two weeks later, as Gullett was warming up for another start, he would feel something catch in his left shoulder. Afterwards, when trying to shave in the clubhouse, he would not have enough strength in that pitching arm to lift a razor to his face and would never again throw a baseball in a Major League game.

On that evening in Boston, Gullett did not have his best stuff at the start of the game. In the second inning, the second half of the Red Sox lineup had rallied to score four runs off of him, with three of them coming on a home run by Boston’s ninth-place hitter, Butch Hobson. It looked like another crushing blowout in the making for Martin’s team.

But in the top of the fourth, the Yankee bats came to life and five of the first six hitters reached base safely against Torrez and produced three runs. With Yankees on second and third, Boston Manager, Don Zimmer ordered Torrez to intentionally walk Jim Spencer. That brought up Stanley with the bases loaded and his team trailing by a single digit. He pulled the third pitch of his at bat over the Monster in fair territory for a grand slam. Though they called him “the Chicken,” teammates said he had his chest puffed out like a rooster when he walked back to the dugout after that bases loaded dinger.

Now with a three-run lead, Gullett settled down and pretty much dominated the Boston lineup the rest of the way. Later in the game, Reggie Jackson would add a three-run blast and the Yankees revenged their 10-4 defeat of the night before with a 10-4 victory of their own.

Yankee fans should always remember that even though Dent’s Fenway home run over the Monster off Torrez got a lot more attention, it never would have happened if Stanley had not hit his over that same wall off of that same pitcher, first.

Today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant was born in Farnhamville, IA on August 13,  1947. He had to be a superb defensive infielder because he lasted for eight seasons in Pinstripes even though he hit just .223 during his Yankee career. Besides that home run in Fenway, the one other exception to his offensive ineptitude came at another  opportune time for New York. Stanley hit .333 for the Yankees during their 1976 ALC series against Kansas City. He now works in the San Franciso Giant front office.

Stanley shares his August 13th birthday with this former Yankee starting pitcher,  this current Yankee reliever and this former Yankee outfield prospect.

Year Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1973 NYY AL 26 75 66 6 14 0 1 1 5 0 7 16 .212 .288 .288 .576
1974 NYY AL 33 42 38 2 7 0 0 0 3 1 3 2 .184 .244 .184 .428
1975 NYY AL 117 284 252 34 56 5 1 0 15 3 21 27 .222 .283 .250 .533
1976 NYY AL 110 306 260 32 62 2 2 1 20 1 34 29 .238 .329 .273 .602
1977 NYY AL 48 56 46 6 12 0 0 1 7 1 8 6 .261 .370 .326 .696
1978 NYY AL 81 189 160 14 35 7 0 1 9 0 25 31 .219 .324 .281 .606
1979 NYY AL 57 110 100 9 20 1 0 2 14 0 5 17 .200 .236 .270 .506
1980 NYY AL 49 95 86 13 18 3 0 0 5 0 5 5 .209 .266 .244 .510
14 Yrs 816 1906 1650 197 356 38 5 10 120 11 196 243 .216 .301 .263 .564
NYY (8 yrs) 521 1157 1008 116 224 18 4 6 78 6 108 133 .222 .299 .266 .565
OAK (2 yrs) 167 427 373 48 72 11 0 2 24 2 44 55 .193 .280 .239 .519
CLE (2 yrs) 66 175 141 15 31 5 0 2 12 1 29 28 .220 .355 .298 .653
MIL (2 yrs) 23 48 43 3 12 2 1 0 4 1 3 8 .279 .319 .372 .691
SDP (1 yr) 39 99 85 15 17 2 0 0 2 1 12 19 .200 .306 .224 .530
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/14/2013.

July 27 – Happy Birthday Leo Durocher

I have read a lot of books about baseball in my lifetime. One of the best was “Nice Guys Finish Last,” the autobiography of Leo “The Lip” Durocher. I was not a fan of Durocher’s but I loved his book. I certainly was not alone in my dislike for the outspoken, ego maniacal native of West Springfield, MA, who started his almost fifty-year career in the big leagues as a Yankee shortstop. Miller Huggins loved the kid’s aggressiveness and the New York skipper gradually gave Durocher more and more playing time at short at the expense of the much more mild mannered Mark Koenig. In “Nice Guys Finish Last,” Durocher claims he used to sit right next to Huggins on the bench and write down every move the manager made in a little black book the shortstop carried with him at all times.Huggins biggest problem as Yankee field boss was trying to instill some sense of discipline in Babe Ruth and a core group of his Yankee teammates who seemed to follow the Bambino’s lead on and off the field, regardless if it was good or bad. Huggins began using Durocher’s willingness to do anything he was told to do by his manager as an example for his teammates to follow. Of course, Durocher’s willingness to comply with Huggins every request was looked upon by those same teammates as the age-old practice of ass-kissing. Compounding the young shortstop’s reputation problems was the fact that he dressed in flashy clothes, ate in fancy restaurants and loved to pal around and gamble with celebrities who did not play baseball for a living, all on a rookie’s salary.

On the field, Leo could not hit but he was above average defensively and always gave you the impression he was hustling and playing hard. He surprised many by hitting .270 during his first full season in pinstripes in 1928. He slumped a bit at the plate the following year but what most likely ended Durocher’s slightly longer than two-year Yankee career was the tragic and sudden death of Huggins during the ’29 season. Durocher also claims in his book that it was his propensity to spend a lot more than he was making that got him sold to the Reds after the 1929 season. Specifically, after Yankee GM Ed Barrow refused to give the shortstop a salary advance, Leo told him to “Go F himself.”

Leo went on to enjoy a 17-year playing career with the Reds, the Cardinal’s Gashouse Gang teams and finally the Brooklyn Dodgers. He transitioned into managing in 1939, while still playing for the Dodgers and during his 26 years as a field skipper his record was 2008-1709 and his teams won two NL Pennants and 1 World Series. If you have not read “Nice Guys Finish Last,” I highly recommend you do so and form your own opinions about “Leo the Lip.”

Today is also the birthday of another Yankee who may or may not one day join Durocher in Cooperstown. This former Yankee utility infielder and this Yankee pitcher from the 1950’s were  also born on July 27th.
Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1925 NYY 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
1928 NYY 102 329 296 46 80 8 6 0 31 1 22 52 .270 .327 .338 .665
1929 NYY 106 385 341 53 84 4 5 0 32 3 34 33 .246 .320 .287 .607
17 Yrs 1637 5829 5350 575 1320 210 56 24 567 31 377 480 .247 .299 .320 .619
G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
BRO (6 yrs) 345 1195 1094 97 267 49 12 3 113 6 88 72 .244 .303 .319 .622
STL (5 yrs) 683 2587 2395 272 611 100 20 15 294 18 155 201 .255 .302 .332 .634
CIN (4 yrs) 399 1332 1223 106 278 49 13 6 97 3 78 122 .227 .275 .303 .579
NYY (3 yrs) 210 715 638 100 164 12 11 0 63 4 56 85 .257 .323 .310 .633
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/27/2013.

January 27- Happy Birthday Angel Berroa

Berroa was awful during his 21-game, early-part-of-the-season tenure with the Yankees in 2009. This Dominican’s best years were spent with the Royals. In fact, he was the 2003 AL Rookie of the Year with Kansas City, when he hit .287, smacked 17 home runs, stole 21 bases and drove in 87 runs as the team’s first-year starting shortstop. With New York during their championship season, he was hitting just .136 when he was released that July. He was quickly picked up by the Mets, enabling him to finish his 2009 season in the same city it began.

Berroa shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this one and this one too.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2009 NYY 21 24 22 6 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 6 .136 .174 .182 .356
9 Yrs 746 2807 2575 329 665 118 21 46 254 50 117 460 .258 .303 .374 .677
KCR (7 yrs) 627 2496 2300 293 606 103 20 45 235 50 94 407 .263 .305 .384 .689
NYM (1 yr) 14 31 27 4 4 1 0 0 2 0 3 6 .148 .233 .185 .419
LAD (1 yr) 84 256 226 26 52 13 1 1 16 0 20 41 .230 .304 .310 .614
NYY (1 yr) 21 24 22 6 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 6 .136 .174 .182 .356
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/29/2014.

January 18 – Happy Birthday to a Number 5

pinstripe.5.jpgThe Yankees began wearing numbers on their uniforms during the 1929 season. At the time, the numbers were assigned based on the player’s batting position in the lineup. This explains how Babe Ruth got the number three and how Yankee cleanup hitter, Lou Gehrig secured number 4. The first Yankee to wear number 5 during that 1929 season was the talented but very moody outfielder, Bob Meusel. In 1930, it was assigned to the great second baseman, Tony “Poosh em Up” Lazzeri. Frank Crosetti was then given the number in 1932 and Lazzeri was switched to number 6. Crosetti wore number 5 for the next four seasons except for a short time, during the 1935 season, when the Crow got hurt and couldn’t play. The Yankees called up Nolen Richardson to take Crosetti’s spot. Richardson was a middle infielder who had played a bit of big league ball for the Tigers before he joined the Yankee organization. Since he was replacing Crosetti, the Yankees gave him uniform number 5. The 32-year-old native of Chattanooga, TN did not see much action in that uniform, appearing in just 12 games that season before getting sent down to New York’s Newark Bears farm club. He became a popular member of the Bears and was the Captain of the 1937 team that is still considered to be one of the greatest teams in minor league history, winning the International League’s pennant that season by 25 1/2 games.

Joe DiMaggio did not get number 5 until 1937, his second season in pinstripes. Crosetti kept the number until 1936. Joltin Joe wore number 9 as a rookie in 1936. Incredibly, the Yankees didn’t even keep number 5 in mothballs during the WWII when Joe D served in the military. Instead, New York’s wartime first baseman, Nick Etten got the number in 1943 and kept it until the Yankee Clipper returned for the 1946 season.

The only other Yankee born on this date was still waiting to make his debut in pinstripes as the 2014 regular season approaches.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1935 NYY 12 49 46 3 10 1 1 0 5 0 3 1 .217 .265 .283 .548
6 Yrs 168 509 473 39 117 19 5 0 45 8 23 22 .247 .282 .309 .591
DET (3 yrs) 120 351 324 28 78 14 4 0 30 8 17 17 .241 .279 .309 .587
CIN (2 yrs) 36 109 103 8 29 4 0 0 10 0 3 4 .282 .302 .320 .622
NYY (1 yr) 12 49 46 3 10 1 1 0 5 0 3 1 .217 .265 .283 .548
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/22/2014.

November 25 – Happy Birthday Bucky Dent

Russell Earl Dent was a very good defensive shortstop who helped solidify the middle of the Yankee infield when New York acquired him from the White Sox in an April, 1977 trade. Bucky was one of those players who never seemed to be featured in the headlines or a post game report. He just gave his team solid and steady play both in the field and at the plate, game after game. But in one brief shining moment, Bucky Dent became a pinstripe legend, and gave all Yankee fans a thrill that will forever be cited as one of the top moments in franchise history. His home run against Red Sox starter Mike Torrez in the 1978 playoff game to decide the AL East division race, just cleared the top of Fenway’s Green Monster, simultaneously bringing Boston’s dejected left fielder, Carl Yastrzemski to his knees and millions of Yankee fans, screaming in sheer ecstasy, to their feet. Dent’s blast gave the Yankees a lead they never relinquished and they went on to capture their second consecutive World Championship that season. Bucky remained hot in that Fall Classic against the Dodgers, hitting .417, driving in 7 runs and winning the Series MVP award.

He continued to start at shortstop for New York for the next three and a half years before getting traded to Texas for outfielder, Lee Mazzilli, during the 1982 season. In all, the Savannah, Georgia native played for twelve seasons in the big leagues, retiring in 1984 with 1,114 career hits and a .247 lifetime batting average. He then got into coaching, started a very successful baseball instructional school and actually piloted the Yankees for parts of the 1988 and ’89 seasons. I personally will never forget sitting in front of my television set on that early October afternoon in 1978 and hearing Yankee announcer Bill White call out the words “Deep to left…”

Bucky shares his November 25th birthday with this guy, this guy and this guy too.

Here are Dent’s Yankee and career playing stats:

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1977 NYY 158 540 477 54 118 18 4 8 49 1 39 28 .247 .300 .352 .653
1978 NYY 123 415 379 40 92 11 1 5 40 3 23 24 .243 .286 .317 .603
1979 NYY 141 490 431 47 99 14 2 2 32 0 37 30 .230 .287 .285 .573
1980 NYY 141 553 489 57 128 26 2 5 52 0 48 37 .262 .327 .354 .681
1981 NYY 73 258 227 20 54 11 0 7 27 0 19 17 .238 .300 .379 .679
1982 NYY 59 173 160 11 27 1 1 0 9 0 8 11 .169 .207 .188 .395
12 Yrs 1392 5026 4512 451 1114 169 23 40 423 17 328 349 .247 .297 .321 .618
NYY (6 yrs) 695 2429 2163 229 518 81 10 27 209 4 174 147 .239 .295 .324 .618
CHW (4 yrs) 509 1973 1777 168 462 64 11 10 165 10 117 159 .260 .305 .325 .631
TEX (2 yrs) 177 614 563 52 131 24 2 3 48 3 36 41 .233 .278 .298 .577
KCR (1 yr) 11 10 9 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 .333 .400 .333 .733
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/24/2013.

Here are Dent’s stats as Yankee manager:

Rk Year Tm Lg W L W-L% G Finish
1 1989 New York Yankees AL 2nd of 2 18 22 .450 40 5
2 1990 New York Yankees AL 1st of 2 18 31 .367 49 7
2 years 36 53 .404 89 6.0
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/24/2013.

October 2 – Happy Birthday Andre Robertson

The sky was supposed to be the limit for Andre when he first joined the Yankees in 1981. He had good speed, a decent bat and was a great fielder. Some Big Apple sports pundits were calling him the next Rizzuto. By the summer of 1983 he appeared to be coming into his own. He had officially taken over the starting shortstop position from the veteran Roy Smalley and seemed to be growing more comfortable and confident in both the field and batters box with each game he played.

Then after a thirteen-inning August night-game loss to the White Sox, Robertson went home to his Fort Lee, NJ apartment and called a lady friend who happened to be visiting from Robertson’s home state of Texas. Neither could sleep so they decided to meet and go dancing at Studio 54 and then take pictures of the Statue of Liberty. It was on their way to lower Manhattan on the West Side highway that Robertson crashed his car. He broke his neck and his friend sustained injuries that have paralyzed her for life. Although Robertson’s neck healed, the tragedy derailed his baseball career and by 1985 he was out of the game for good. Robertson was born in Orange, TX. He is 53 years-old today.

Andre shares his October 2nd birthday with this former Yankee pitcheranother former Yankee shortstop and this other former Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1981 NYY 10 19 19 1 5 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 .263 .263 .316 .579
1982 NYY 44 128 118 16 26 5 0 2 9 0 8 19 .220 .270 .314 .583
1983 NYY 98 343 322 37 80 16 3 1 22 2 8 54 .248 .271 .326 .597
1984 NYY 52 152 140 10 30 5 1 0 6 0 4 20 .214 .236 .264 .500
1985 NYY 50 136 125 16 41 5 0 2 17 1 6 24 .328 .358 .416 .774
5 Yrs 254 778 724 80 182 32 4 5 54 4 26 120 .251 .279 .327 .607
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/2/2013.

August 10 – Happy Birthday Andy Stankiewicz

Andy was already 27 years old when he made his big league debut for Buck Showalter’s 1992 Yankees. He actually took over for Randy Velarde as that team’s starting shortstop. I had first seen “Stanky” play in 1989, when he started at second base for New York’s Albany-Colonie Double A franchise. The thing that stuck out at you when you watched him on the field was his hustle. That’s why Showalter liked him and gave him the opportunity to play. That first big league season turned out to be the highlight of Andy’s seven-year career in the big leagues. Over time, however, Andy proved he couldn’t hit big league pitching well enough to play every day at that level. Andy was born on this date in 1964, in Inglewood, CA.

Also born on this date in the Big Apple in 1933 was Rocco Domenico Colavito. If you saw him play during the late fifties and sixties, you have to remember how he used to point his bat at the opposing pitcher’s head at the end of his warm-up swings. He only played a part of one season in pinstripes and it was the final season (1968) of his 14-year big league career. He hit the last five of his 374 big league home runs in a Yankee uniform. You can read more about Colavito in this post. This second Yankee outfielder and this former Yankee pitcher were also born on August 10.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1992 NYY 116 451 400 52 107 22 2 2 25 9 38 42 .268 .338 .348 .685
1993 NYY 16 10 9 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 .000 .100 .000 .100
7 Yrs 429 957 844 105 203 45 3 4 59 17 80 141 .241 .313 .315 .628
MON (2 yrs) 140 207 184 23 46 14 1 1 14 2 10 34 .250 .296 .353 .650
NYY (2 yrs) 132 461 409 57 107 22 2 2 25 9 39 43 .262 .333 .340 .672
HOU (2 yrs) 80 134 106 16 20 4 0 1 12 5 24 31 .189 .344 .255 .598
ARI (1 yr) 77 155 145 9 30 5 0 0 8 1 7 33 .207 .252 .241 .493
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/9/2013.