Results tagged ‘ second baseman ’

January 24 – Happy Birthday Earle Gardner

earle_gardnerThough they were also referred to as the Americans, their Highlanders’ nickname fit them well because they played their home games in a place called Hilltop Park, which was located on one of the highest points on Manhattan island. The team landed there in 1903 when Ban Johnson’s upstart American League relocated its Baltimore Oriole franchise to the Big Apple. It was a forced move that caused tons of bad blood and hostility. As a result, just about the entire Orioles roster either refused to make the move or were not offered the opportunity to do so. This forced the Highlanders to throw a team together in a helter skelter fashion, that included boozers, brawlers, gamblers and a few talented ball players thrown in for good measure. Co-owned by one of New York City’s biggest gambling barons and a retired corrupt cop, the club played as erratically as the hit-or-miss evolution of the team’s roster suggested it would. They finished 4th, 2nd, 6th, 2nd, 5th, last, 5th, 2nd, 6th and last during their first decade in their new home. They battled helplessly for the attention of city’s baseball fans and baseball press in those early years with John McGraw’s mighty Giants. Things really didn’t get better for the team and its fans until the franchise was purchased by a couple of very wealthy colonels named Rupert and Huston in 1915.

Earle Gardner joined the team in 1908. He was a five foot eleven inch, 160 pound second baseman from Sparta, IL, who during three previous seasons in the minors had developed a reputation with his fancy glove work. He was also a decent hitter, averaging right around .300 in three different classes of farm league ball. It took him two-and-a-half seasons to claim the starting second-baseman’s job and he was only able to hold onto it for just a year-and-a-half. He hit .263 in 1911, his only full season as a starter and then he gave way to Hack Simmons in 1912.

Just 28 years-old at the time he lost his starting position, Gardner returned to minor league ball and never again played in a big league game. He ended up with a .263 lifetime average during his five seasons in New York. He continued playing in the minors until 1918. He died in 1943 at the age of 59.

Gardner shares his birthday with this former Yankee relief pitcher and this one too.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS OPS+
1908 NYY 20 80 75 7 16 2 0 0 4 0 1 6 .213 .234 .240 .474 54
1909 NYY 22 89 85 12 28 4 0 0 15 4 3 8 .329 .352 .376 .729 129
1910 NYY 86 303 271 36 66 4 2 1 24 9 21 22 .244 .303 .284 .587 79
1911 NYY 102 395 357 36 94 13 2 0 39 14 20 27 .263 .312 .311 .622 70
1912 NYY 43 170 160 14 45 3 1 0 26 11 5 8 .281 .303 .313 .616 72
5 Yrs 273 1037 948 105 249 26 5 1 108 38 50 71 .263 .305 .304 .609 76
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/24/2014.

January 7 – Happy Birthday Alfonso Soriano

sorianotpUp until the 2009 World Series, one of my most frequent Yankee related “What if…” questions was “What if the Yankees never traded Alfonso Soriano for A-Rod.” Then A-Rod finally put together an outstanding postseason that year and led my favorite team to its 27th World Championship. At the same time, Soriano had just struggled through his third straight regular season as a Cub and had been horrible in the two postseasons he played in for Chicago.  So I stopped playing the “What if…” game.

Since that 2009 World Series however, A-Rod has emphatically confirmed all of his maddening insecurities that negatively impact his play and make it so hard to root for him. Soriano, on the other hand, has taken advantage of an unexpected return trip to the Bronx to remind us all of just how amazing a ballplayer he can be when he goes on one of his patented “hot streaks.” So I again find myself asking the question, “what if that trade in February of 2004 had never been made?”

If the deal never went down, worst case scenario would be that the Yanks would have failed to win that 2009 title. Rodriguez also put some monster years together during his time in pinstripes especially in ’05 and ’07 so you have to wonder if without him, New York might have missed postseason play all-together in a couple of those seasons. But Soriano’s body of work during that same period of time was not too shabby either and don’t forget the Yanks would have probably used the many extra millions they paid A-Rod to sign at least one other impact free agent. The biggest benefit of getting rid of Soriano was that it opened up the opportunity for Robbie Cano to become New York’s starting second baseman. If you remember, when Soriano was traded to the Nationals from Texas, he fought Washington’s desire to move him from second base to the outfield. Knowing how the Yanks operate, the chances are pretty good they would have dealt a young Cano to another organization because they would have kept Soriano at second.

Oh well, we will never really know the true consequences but it’s fun to surmise. Meanwhile, Soriano turns 38-years-old today and is once again being counted on to help New York win a World Series. The Yankee brain-trust had to force GM Brian Cashman to make the deal with the Cubs that brought this native Dominican back to New York in late July of the 2013 season and thank God they did. At the time the Yankee offense was sinking like the Titanic in the AL East pennant race. Soriano desperately wanted to wear the pinstripes again and willingly waived the no-trade clause in his Cubs contract to make it happen. Then he went out and put the Yankee lineup on his back and just about single-handedly kept the team in contention for fall ball up until the final few weeks of the regular season.

With the free agent signings of Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran, Soriano’s role in the Yankees’ 2014 plans remains unclear. They have a glut of outfielders and DH’s on their current roster. But I’m hoping he gets a chance to start somewhere in the Yankee lineup because I don’t want to ask myself any more “What if the Yankees had kept Alfonso Soriano” questions.

This MVP of the 1952 World Series and this catcher from the 1927 Yankees were also born on January 7.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1998 Did not play in major leagues (Did Not Play)
1999 NYY 9 8 8 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 .125 .125 .500 .625
2000 NYY 22 53 50 5 9 3 0 2 3 2 1 15 .180 .196 .360 .556
2001 NYY 158 614 574 77 154 34 3 18 73 43 29 125 .268 .304 .432 .736
2002 NYY 156 741 696 128 209 51 2 39 102 41 23 157 .300 .332 .547 .880
2003 NYY 156 734 682 114 198 36 5 38 91 35 38 130 .290 .338 .525 .863
2013 NYY 58 243 219 37 56 8 0 17 50 8 21 67 .256 .325 .525 .850
15 Yrs 1908 8157 7524 1130 2045 466 31 406 1136 288 490 1732 .272 .321 .504 .825
CHC (7 yrs) 889 3696 3403 469 898 218 13 181 526 70 245 829 .264 .317 .495 .812
NYY (6 yrs) 559 2393 2229 363 627 132 10 115 320 129 112 497 .281 .323 .504 .827
TEX (2 yrs) 301 1340 1245 179 341 75 6 64 195 48 66 246 .274 .316 .498 .814
WSN (1 yr) 159 728 647 119 179 41 2 46 95 41 67 160 .277 .351 .560 .911
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/8/2014.

January 3 – Happy Birthday Luis Sojo

Luis Sojo was one of my favorite Yankees. He had that wonderful ability to sit on the bench for most of a game and then grab his glove and instantly make a difficult play look easy from any infield position. I also would get a kick out of his rumpled appearance in a Yankee uniform, which always reminded me sort of the way Yogi Berra looked in pinstripes. The Yankees first got him off waivers from Seattle during the 1996 season and the following year, the native Venezuelan took over the starting second base position from Mariano Duncan. When the Yankees acquired Chuck Knoblauch from the Twins to play second in 1998, Sojo became the team’s reliable utility infielder. After the 1999 season, Luis signed as a free agent with the Pirates but when Knoblauch’s strange throwing problems peaked, New York traded to get Sojo back in August of 2000, setting up his most magical moment as a Yankee. That came in the ninth inning of the fifth and final game of that season’s Subway Series. With the score tied 2-2 in the top of the ninth, Sojo came to bat for the first time after being inserted to play second base in the previous inning. His ground ball single through the middle off of Al Leiter scored Jorge Posada from second. Scott Brosius also scored on the play when the throw home trying to nail Posada was way off the mark and the Yankees were once again World Champs. I was thrilled for Sojo. The guy won four rings as a Yankee. He then became New York’s third base coach for a couple of seasons and until last year, managed the Yankees Tampa Minor League club.

Today is also the birthday of this former Yankee pitcher and this colorful pre-WWII outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1996 NYY 18 44 40 3 11 2 0 0 5 0 1 4 .275 .286 .325 .611
1997 NYY 77 239 215 27 66 6 1 2 25 3 16 14 .307 .355 .372 .727
1998 NYY 54 153 147 16 34 3 1 0 14 1 4 15 .231 .250 .265 .515
1999 NYY 49 133 127 20 32 6 0 2 16 1 4 17 .252 .275 .346 .621
2000 NYY 34 134 125 19 36 7 1 2 17 1 6 6 .288 .321 .408 .729
2001 NYY 39 84 79 5 13 2 0 0 9 1 4 12 .165 .214 .190 .404
2003 NYY 3 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
13 Yrs 848 2773 2571 300 671 103 12 36 261 28 124 198 .261 .297 .352 .650
NYY (7 yrs) 274 791 737 90 192 26 3 6 86 7 35 68 .261 .294 .328 .623
SEA (3 yrs) 242 861 799 102 209 35 5 14 77 8 41 57 .262 .300 .370 .671
CAL (2 yrs) 219 793 732 75 194 26 4 10 63 11 28 50 .265 .297 .352 .650
TOR (2 yrs) 52 139 127 19 26 5 0 1 15 1 9 7 .205 .255 .268 .523
PIT (1 yr) 61 189 176 14 50 11 0 5 20 1 11 16 .284 .328 .432 .760
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/4/2014.

December 20 – Happy Birthday Jimmy Williams

Williams.JimmyLast week, Bronx Bomber fans were forced to say good-bye to the most recent “great” second baseman in Yankee franchise history, when Robbie Cano took his magical bat and gifted glove to Seattle for 240 million Mariner bucks. Today, we can say Happy Birthday to the first great second baseman in Yankee franchise history.

Jimmy Williams had made a smashing big league debut in his 1899 rookie season with Pittsburgh, when he led the National League with 27 triples,smashed 9 home runs and averaged a whopping .354. Its no wonder the legendary John McGraw literally kidnapped Williams on his way to the Pirates 1901 spring training camp and enticed him to sign with his newly formed Baltimore Orioles in the newly formed American League.

A third baseman with the Pirates, McGraw switched Williams to second and for the next seven seasons,he established himself as one of the best in the game at that position. Offensively, he continued to be a “triples machine,” leading the league in three-baggers in each of the two seasons the team remained in Baltimore.

When Ban Johnson’s dictatorial antics forced the shift of the Orioles’ franchise to New York before the 1903 season, Williams was one of just four Orioles’ players who made the move north with the club. He and outfielder Harry Howell were the only two starters in the New York Highanders’ first Opening Day lineup who were also in the first ever Baltimore Orioles Opening Day lineup, two seasons earlier. Williams, who was born in St. Louis but spent most of his childhood in Denver, is also credited with driving in the first run in New York Highlander/Yankee history.

Though he never again topped the .300 mark in batting average once the team relocated, he was one of the Highlanders’ best offensive weapons. He consistently finished near the top of the team’s leader board in most of the major hitting categories. He was also well respected by his teammates serving New York’s first-ever  team-captains.

Following the 1907 regular season, New York manager Cal Griffith decided Williams was getting a bit long in the tooth and traded his then 30-year-old infielder to the Browns as part of a six player deal that brought 27-year-old St.Louis second baseman, Harry Niles to New York. Williams ended up outplaying Niles during each player’s first season with their new teams but Williams would falter badly for the Browns the following year, (1909) averaging just .195.

Instead of quitting, he went back to the minors and spent the final six years of his playing career manning second base for the Minneapolis Millers in the American Association. A favorite of Minneapolis fans, Williams ended up settling in that city after he finally retired in 1915. He died there in 1965, at the age of 89.

Williams shares his birthday with one of baseball’s greatest business minds and also with  this former Yankee DH and outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1901 BLA 130 568 501 113 159 26 21 7 96 21 56 36 .317 .388 .495 .883
1902 BLA 125 545 498 83 156 27 21 8 83 14 36 46 .313 .361 .500 .861
1903 NYY 132 554 502 60 134 30 12 3 82 9 39 54 .267 .326 .392 .718
1904 NYY 146 612 559 62 147 31 7 2 74 14 38 65 .263 .314 .354 .669
1905 NYY 129 533 470 54 107 20 8 6 62 14 50 46 .228 .306 .343 .648
1906 NYY 139 571 501 61 139 25 7 3 77 8 44 51 .277 .342 .373 .715
1907 NYY 139 551 504 53 136 17 11 2 63 14 35 50 .270 .319 .359 .678
11 Yrs 1457 6116 5485 780 1508 242 138 49 796 151 474 531 .275 .337 .396 .733
NYY (7 yrs) 940 3934 3535 486 978 176 87 31 537 94 298 348 .277 .337 .402 .739
PIT (2 yrs) 259 1148 1037 199 330 43 38 14 184 44 92 78 .318 .379 .473 .853
SLB (2 yrs) 258 1034 913 95 200 23 13 4 75 13 84 105 .219 .288 .286 .574
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/20/2013.

December 5 – Happy Birthday Joe Gedeon

gedeonToday’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant was born in Sacramento, California on December 5, 1893 and became a star athlete at Sacramento High School. He was so good that Calvin Griffith, the legendary manager and future owner of the Washington Senators, brought Elmer “Joe” Gedeon to the big leagues when he was just 19 years-old. The problem was that back then, the big leagues played all of their games east of the Mississippi and most of them in cities that didn’t get warm until June. Gedeon hated cold weather and was far from disappointed when the Senators sent him back to the much more mild game-time temperatures of the Pacific Coast League for more experience after the 1914 season.

After he put together a great year as the starting second baseman for the Salt Lake City Bees, Griffith wanted him back in Washington. But the Newark franchise in the upstart Federal League lured him away with a very attractive two-year deal that then fell apart when that struggling enterprise went belly-up. That’s when the Yankees swooped in and signed Gedeon to play second base for their 1916 team.

By all accounts,Gedeon had a super spring training camp that year and beat out Luke Boone for the starting job. His hot hitting continued early in the season and his batting average was at .319 at the end of April. He couldn’t keep it up, however and ended his first year with New York hitting just .211. He then lost his job to Fritz Maisel during the 1917 season and was traded to the Browns in January of 1918.

Still just 23 years-old at the time of that deal, over the next three seasons Gedeon got better with both the bat and the glove and was soon being touted as one of the AL’s top second baseman. Then misfortune hit him like a ton of bricks.

When the 1919 regular season ended, instead of returning to California right away, Gedeon decided to take in that year’s World Series between the White Sox and Cincinnati. That of course was the Series during which the infamous “Black Sox” scandal took police. Gedeon had buddies on the Chicago team and he later testified to a Grand Jury that those buddies had told him that the games were going to be fixed. Gedeon placed bets totaling about $700 on the Reds. He won the bets but lost his MLB career.

Unbelievably, after volunteering to tell the whole truth to to the grand jury convened the following year to investigate the scandal, Gedeon received a lifetime ban from the game by Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis. More shockingly, many of the White Sox players who also knew the fix was on, received no punishment whatsoever.

A distraught Gedeon went back to California and evidently slowly drank himself to death. When he died in 1941 at the age of 47, he was suffering from severe cirrhosis of the liver.

Gedeon shares his birthday with this former Yankee reliever and this one-time Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1916 NYY 122 491 435 50 92 14 4 0 27 14 40 61 .211 .282 .262 .544
1917 NYY 33 131 117 15 28 7 0 0 8 4 7 13 .239 .288 .299 .587
7 Yrs 584 2446 2109 259 515 82 20 1 171 34 180 181 .244 .311 .303 .615
SLB (3 yrs) 396 1746 1484 191 382 60 13 1 129 13 132 100 .257 .326 .317 .643
WSH (2 yrs) 33 78 73 3 13 1 3 0 7 3 1 7 .178 .211 .274 .484
NYY (2 yrs) 155 622 552 65 120 21 4 0 35 18 47 74 .217 .284 .270 .554
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/5/2013.