Results tagged ‘ second baseman ’

May 16 – Happy Birthday Billy Martin

martinI never was a big fan of Billy Martin. I was too young to remember his playing days with the Yankees in the fifties. When he started managing in the American League, first for the Twins in 1969 and then the Tigers in 1971, I remember trying to learn more about him. Everything I read seemed to indicate he had a great will to win, a strong knowledge of the game but an extremely bad temper. This helped explain why he was fired from his first three managerial positions even after he helped turn losing teams into winners.

When George Steinbrenner became managing partner of the Yankees the perfect storm necessary to bring these two unpredictable forces together in the Bronx had been formed. In the beginning, it worked marvelously. The Yankees got back to the World Series and fans filled the Stadium like never before. It didn’t last long, however. Martin’s dependence on alcohol worsened under the pressure of Steinbrenner’s meddling and the glare of the New York media. Once these fault lines became public during and after the 1977 season, Martin would never again be able to command the respect or support of his players necessary to lead them to championships.

As more and more Yankees and ex-Yankees began talking and writing about their experiences while playing for Martin, a clearer picture of his addiction to alcohol, his emotional insecurity, and his inhumane behavior emerged. What respect I had for his past achievements was quickly replaced by pity for what he had become.

Having written all this it is only fair to point out that there are many people who knew Martin personally and who played with him and for him on a baseball field who loved and deeply respected the guy. My opinions of him were formed from the far-away focus of a typical baseball fan.

He died on Christmas day in 1989 when his truck was driven into a ditch by a friend who was allegedly driving intoxicated at the time of the accident. It has also been reported that the driver and Martin had been drinking all day. May he now be resting in peace.

During his final season as Yankee skipper in 1989, Martin had this right-handed veteran starter who shares his May 16th birthday, on his pitching staff. Martin was not the Yankee manager when this other May 16th born right-hander pitched in pinstripes, during the 1981 season. This former Yankee reliever was also born on that day.

Martin’s record as a Yankee player:

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1950 NYY 34 39 36 10 9 1 0 1 8 0 3 3 .250 .308 .361 .669
1951 NYY 51 65 58 10 15 1 2 0 2 0 4 9 .259 .328 .345 .673
1952 NYY 109 401 363 32 97 13 3 3 33 3 22 31 .267 .323 .344 .668
1953 NYY 149 644 587 72 151 24 6 15 75 6 43 56 .257 .314 .395 .710
1954 Did not play in major leagues (Military Service)
1955 NYY 20 80 70 8 21 2 0 1 9 1 7 9 .300 .354 .371 .726
1956 NYY 121 504 458 76 121 24 5 9 49 7 30 56 .264 .310 .397 .708
1957 NYY 43 154 145 12 35 5 2 1 12 2 3 14 .241 .257 .324 .581
11 Yrs 1021 3716 3419 425 877 137 28 64 333 34 188 355 .257 .300 .369 .669
NYY (7 yrs) 527 1887 1717 220 449 70 18 30 188 19 112 178 .262 .313 .376 .688
MIN (1 yr) 108 398 374 44 92 15 5 6 36 3 13 42 .246 .275 .361 .636
MLN (1 yr) 6 6 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .000 .000 .000 .000
KCA (1 yr) 73 285 265 33 68 9 3 9 27 7 12 20 .257 .295 .415 .710
CIN (1 yr) 103 346 317 34 78 17 1 3 16 0 27 34 .246 .304 .334 .639
CLE (1 yr) 73 258 242 37 63 7 0 9 24 0 8 18 .260 .290 .401 .691
DET (1 yr) 131 536 498 56 127 19 1 7 42 5 16 62 .255 .279 .339 .619
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/15/2013.

Martin’s record as a Yankee manager:

Rk Year Age Tm Lg G W L W-L% Finish
8 1975 47 New York Yankees AL 2nd of 2 56 30 26 .536 3
9 1976 48 New York Yankees AL 159 97 62 .610 1 AL Pennant
10 1977 49 New York Yankees AL 162 100 62 .617 1 WS Champs
11 1978 50 New York Yankees AL 1st of 3 94 52 42 .553 1
12 1979 51 New York Yankees AL 2nd of 2 95 55 40 .579 4
17 1983 55 New York Yankees AL 162 91 71 .562 3
18 1985 57 New York Yankees AL 2nd of 2 145 91 54 .628 2
19 1988 60 New York Yankees AL 1st of 2 68 40 28 .588 5
Minnesota Twins 1 year 162 97 65 .599 1.0
Detroit Tigers 3 years 452 248 204 .549 2.0
Texas Rangers 3 years 279 137 141 .493 3.7
Oakland Athletics 3 years 433 215 218 .497 2.5
New York Yankees 8 years 941 556 385 .591 2.5 2 Pennants and 1 World Series Title
16 years 2267 1253 1013 .553 2.5 2 Pennants and 1 World Series Title
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/15/2013.

May 6 – Happy Birthday Lute Boone

There have been 30 starting second basemen in Yankee franchise history. If he had played two or three more years in the Bronx instead of leaving for Seattle in 2014, Robinson Cano would have certainly been considered the greatest Yankee second sacker of all time.  In my opinion, he now falls just short. That honor still belongs to the Hall of Famer, Tony Lazzeri, who started at second base for New York for twelve seasons. One of my favorites, Willie Randolph holds the record for most seasons starting at second base for the Yankees with thirteen. Cano started at second for New York for nine straight seasons, tying him with Bobby Richardson. The first second baseman in franchise history was a guy named Jimmy Williams, who held the job for seven straight seasons, until 1907. Today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant, Lute Boone was the starting second baseman for New York in 1914 and ’15.  An excellent defensive infielder, he was a horrible big league hitter, averaging  just .209 during his four seasons in the Big Apple. He had much better success hitting in the American Association. That’s where he ended up after his big league career ended for good in 1918. He kept playing in that league until he was 40 years old and then he became an owner and player manager of his own minor league team. Here’s a look at some key stats of my picks for the top five second basemen in Yankee franchise history:

Player                      Yrs Starting      G       H      R       HR    RBI       AVE    Rings

Tony Lazzeri              12                1659   1784  952   169   1154   .293     5

Willie Randolph          13                1694   1731  1027    48   549   .275     2

Robinson Cano           9                 1374  1649   799   204   822    .309      1

Joe Gordon                 7                 1000  1000   596   153   975    .271      4

Bobby Richardson       9                  1412  1432   643     34    390   .266      1

Lute Boone shares his May 6th birthday with this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1913 NYY 6 15 12 3 4 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 .333 .467 .333 .800
1914 NYY 106 413 370 34 82 8 2 0 21 10 18 31 41 .222 .285 .254 .539
1915 NYY 130 494 431 44 88 12 2 5 43 14 17 41 53 .204 .285 .276 .562
1916 NYY 46 146 124 14 23 4 0 1 8 7 8 10 .185 .252 .242 .494
5 Yrs 315 1169 1028 102 215 27 4 6 76 32 35 91 111 .209 .282 .261 .543
NYY (4 yrs) 288 1068 937 95 197 24 4 6 73 31 35 83 105 .210 .284 .264 .547
PIT (1 yr) 27 101 91 7 18 3 0 0 3 1 8 6 .198 .263 .231 .493
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table Generated 5/6/2013.

March 13 – Happy Birthday Mariano Duncan

By the time the Yankees signed Mariano Duncan as a free agent in December of 1995, the Dominican middle infielder was already a 32-year-old, 11-year veteran of the big leagues. The Yankees expected to play their rookie, Derek Jeter at short in 1996 and were going to move switch-hitting Tony Fernandez from short to second. They wanted Duncan to serve as a backup for both positions. That plan fell apart when Fernandez got hurt in spring training and was shelved for the year. Manager Joe Torre gave Yankee rookie Andy Fox every chance to win the second base job but the youngster could not get his average up to .200. Then Torre gave Duncan a try. He responded with the best season of his career.

Mariano hit .340 in 109 games that year. He became a leader in that Yankee clubhouse and his popular pre-game pronouncement, “We play today, we win today…dassit” became the slogan of that amazing club. When the Yankees won the 1996 Pennant and World Series, I was pretty certain Duncan would be back to start at second again in 1997. But George Steinbrenner did not feel the same way. He did not think Duncan was good enough defensively and when the Boss’s feeling became public, Mariano was angry and demanded to be traded. The Yankees tried to grant him that wish by reaching a deal with the Padres that would send Duncan and pitcher Kenny Rogers to San Diego in return for slugger Greg Vaughn. When Vaughn failed his physical and the deal was voided, Duncan became even more vocal about his dislike for Steinbrenner. Finally, after the All Star break, the Yankees traded Duncan to Toronto. He played his final 39 big league games as a Blue Jay and then tried Japanese baseball for a year before retiring for good.

Yankee fans will always remember Mariano’s great year in 1996 and he has a ring on his finger to prove it. This former Yankee slugger shares a March 13 birthday with Mariano as does this former outfielder who was the last Yankee to wear uniform number 7 before Mickey Mantle made it famous.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1996 NYY 109 417 400 62 136 34 3 8 56 4 9 77 .340 .352 .500 .852
1997 NYY 50 179 172 16 42 8 0 1 13 2 6 39 .244 .270 .308 .578
12 Yrs 1279 4998 4677 619 1247 233 37 87 491 174 201 913 .267 .300 .388 .688
PHI (4 yrs) 406 1698 1613 208 442 100 9 30 194 40 46 311 .274 .298 .403 .701
LAD (4 yrs) 376 1439 1314 161 307 44 8 20 95 100 85 268 .234 .284 .325 .609
CIN (4 yrs) 299 1089 1011 152 282 41 17 28 121 24 49 179 .279 .316 .436 .752
NYY (2 yrs) 159 596 572 78 178 42 3 9 69 6 15 116 .311 .327 .442 .769
TOR (1 yr) 39 176 167 20 38 6 0 0 12 4 6 39 .228 .267 .263 .531
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/7/2014.