Results tagged ‘ scott brosius ’

August 15 – Happy Birthday Scott Brosius

If you watched last evening’s (8/14/2013) Yankee game, in which New York destroyed the Angels for the second consecutive night, you heard Paul O’Neill tell his TV booth partners that the 1998 Yankee team he played on was as close to a perfect team as he had ever been associated with. I couldn’t agree more.

The 1961 Yankees were my favorite team of all time and the 1978 Yankees were the most dramatic. The 1996 Yankees gave me the biggest thrill I ever had as a baseball fan but it was the 1998 Yankees who were the best team I’ve ever seen play a season, beginning to end. And if you had to point to one roster change that made the biggest difference between the team that lost the Divisional playoffs to Cleveland the year before and the one that won 114 regular season games and swept the Padres in the 1998 World Series, it would be the addition of Scott Brosius as New York’s starting third baseman. Born on today’s date in 1966, in Hillsboro, OR, the Yankees signed Brosius as a free agent after he spent his first seven big league seasons in Oakland.

Joe Torre inserted his right-handed bat at the bottom of the Yankee lineup. Brosius responded by hitting .300, smacking 19 home runs, scoring 86 runs and driving in 98 more. He turned the bottom of that lineup into an opposing pitcher’s nightmare and he played superb defense as well. But he saved his best for that year’s post season, batting close to .400 in thirteen October games and winning the 1998 World Series MVP award. He was an AL All Star that first year in pinstripes, a Gold Glove winner in 1999, and his thrilling game-winning home run during Game 5 of the 2001 Series against Arizona was a fitting culmination of his brief but great Yankee career.

Brosius shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1998 NYY 152 603 530 86 159 34 0 19 98 11 52 97 .300 .371 .472 .843
1999 NYY 133 529 473 64 117 26 1 17 71 9 39 74 .247 .307 .414 .722
2000 NYY 135 519 470 57 108 20 0 16 64 0 45 73 .230 .299 .374 .673
2001 NYY 120 478 428 57 123 25 2 13 49 3 34 83 .287 .343 .446 .789
11 Yrs 1146 4356 3889 544 1001 200 8 141 531 57 348 699 .257 .323 .422 .744
OAK (7 yrs) 606 2227 1988 280 494 95 5 76 249 34 178 372 .248 .315 .416 .731
NYY (4 yrs) 540 2129 1901 264 507 105 3 65 282 23 170 327 .267 .331 .428 .759
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/15/2013.

August 15 – Happy Birthday Joe Cowley

Right about 1985, I remember thinking Yankee owner, George Steinbrenner had gone insane. It had been four seasons since the Yankees had made the postseason and “the Boss” seemed to be on two missions. The first was to absolve himself from any role in the team’s recent failures to make it to fall ball. He made sure the media understood that he had made or wanted to make all the correct player moves necessary to keep the Yankees in the playoffs perpetually. He had let his “baseball people” talk him out of some of those moves and in the deals he had orchestrated, the players he had acquired had simply choked. His second mission back then was to prove he could single-handedly maneuver the Yankees back into World Series play.

I have never been a big George Steinbrenner fan however, I had appreciated the fact that he was hell-bent on turning my favorite baseball team into winners again. But after that 1985 season, he made a move that absolutely stunned me. He traded Joe Cowley. I loved Joe Cowley. New York had signed the native of Lexington, KY as a free agent in 1983 and sent him to their Triple A team in Columbus. He began the ’84 season going 10-3 for the Clippers. The Yankees brought him up in July of that same year and he became the best starting pitcher on the parent club’s staff in August and September, winning eight straight decisions. Then in 1985, he went 12-6, helping New York win 97 games that season, finishing second to the Blue Jays, who won 99.

So here’s a guy who’s gone 21-8 for New York over two seasons and proven he can win in pinstripes and what’s Steinbrenner do? In December of ’85 he trades him to the Chicago White Sox for Britt Burns. Maybe you’ve never heard of Burns or didn’t realize he had pitched for the Yankees? That’s because he never did. Turns out the guy had a bad hip and never appeared in a single game for New York. Cowley didn’t last too long in Chicago either. He went 11-11 in his only season in the Windy City. In his last-ever victory for the White Sox, he threw a complete-game no-hitter. He lost his next two starts that year and Chicago traded him to the Phillies during the following off-season. After the big right-hander lost his first four starts in 1986, Philadelphia released him and he never again pitched in a big league game. That makes Cowley the only pitcher in big league history who’s last big league victory was a no-hitter.

Cowley shares his August 15th birthday with this MVP of the 1998 World Series.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB IBB SO WHIP
1984 NYY 9 2 .818 3.56 16 11 2 3 1 0 83.1 75 34 33 12 31 1 71 1.272
1985 NYY 12 6 .667 3.95 30 26 2 1 0 0 159.2 132 75 70 29 85 2 97 1.359
5 Yrs 33 25 .569 4.20 95 76 8 8 1 0 469.1 414 243 219 69 232 7 332 1.376
NYY (2 yrs) 21 8 .724 3.81 46 37 4 4 1 0 243.0 207 109 103 41 116 3 168 1.329
PHI (1 yr) 0 4 .000 15.43 5 4 0 0 0 0 11.2 21 26 20 2 17 1 5 3.257
ATL (1 yr) 1 2 .333 4.47 17 8 4 0 0 0 52.1 53 27 26 6 16 2 27 1.318
CHW (1 yr) 11 11 .500 3.88 27 27 0 4 0 0 162.1 133 81 70 20 83 1 132 1.331
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/15/2013.