Results tagged ‘ relief pitcher ’

April 15 – Happy Birthday Aaron Laffey

The Yankees claimed former Seattle Mariner pitcher, Aaron Laffey off waivers in August of 2011 to get a second left-hander in their bullpen. Laffey had spent his first four big league seasons with Cleveland, where he was considered a very decent pitching prospect. He caused quite a stir in 2008 when he started the season by winning his first four decisions but he just couldn’t get over the hump. By 2010, the Tribe had relegated him to the bullpen where he has spent the balance of his career.

The Cumberland, MD native made his pinstripe debut on August 20th of that 2011 season against the Twins but hardly anybody noticed. That’s because it was in the same game that television cameras caught an angry AJ Burnett screaming something in Joe Gerardi’s direction after the Yankee manager lifted his erratic starter in the third inning with the bases full of Twins. Laffey was probably happy to not get any post game attention since he gave up five hits, two walks and two runs in his initial three-inning stint.

He got his first Yankee win in his next appearance against the Orioles, thanks to Jesus Montero’s first two big league home runs. Laffey continued to pitch well in most of his appearances for New York, winning two of three decisions and finishing the season with a 3.38 ERA. That was not good enough to make the team’s postseason roster or keep him from being released by New York. He started the 2013 season as a member of the New York Mets’ bullpen.

Laffey is just the second member of the all-time Yankee roster to celebrate his birthday on April 15th. This merry old right-handed pitcher would have turned 124 years-old today.

Year Tm Lg W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2011 NYY AL 2 1 .667 3.38 11 0 0 0 0 0 10.2 13 4 4 0 5 6 1.688
7 Yrs 25 29 .463 4.39 150 66 13 0 0 1 479.2 536 260 234 46 187 239 1.507
CLE (4 yrs) 18 21 .462 4.41 79 49 4 0 0 1 320.1 359 177 157 22 128 155 1.520
NYM (1 yr) 0 0 5.06 2 1 1 0 0 0 5.1 10 3 3 0 1 6 2.063
NYY (1 yr) 2 1 .667 3.38 11 0 0 0 0 0 10.2 13 4 4 0 5 6 1.688
SEA (1 yr) 1 1 .500 4.01 36 0 7 0 0 0 42.2 54 20 19 7 16 24 1.641
TOR (1 yr) 4 6 .400 4.56 22 16 1 0 0 0 100.2 100 56 51 17 37 48 1.361
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/15/2013.

April 9 – Happy Birthday David Robertson

d-robWhen Mariano Rivera tore his ACL shagging fly balls during a Yankee batting practice in Kauffman Stadium’s outfield in May of 2012, I thought David Robertson’s moment with destiny had arrived. I was sure it would be D-Rob and not the much higher-salaried Rafael Soriano who would be given the opportunity to replace the greatest closer ever to play the game and I was right. The next day it was Robertson who Joe Giardi summoned to pitch the ninth inning of a CC Sabathia 6-2 victory over Kansas City. Back at Yankee Stadium against the Rays a few days later, it was again D-Rob who got the call in the ninth inning, this time in a save situation. I can distinctly remember wondering how Soriano felt that night watching Robertson walk to the mound in a save situation against the team Raffie had left to take millions of Yankee dollars.

Robertson got the save that evening but it wasn’t pretty. He walked two batters and gave up a hit. Yankee fans had gotten use to seeing Robertson put men on base and then wiggle his way out of it. But that was when he was Rivera’s set-up man. Now, as closer, that wiggle room seemed a lot less spacious to Yankee fans and maybe Robertson noticed the difference too. The next night he got shelled for four runs against the same Tampa team, blowing the save and losing the game. The following night, Girardi turned to Soriano to close out the final game of the series and you could feel the torch being passed. A couple nights later, Robertson finished a game in Seattle (a non-save-situation) and the a few days later he was placed on the DL with a strained muscle in his rib cage, which could have been the result of a young pitcher trying too hard in his effort to replace a legend.

When Soriano opted out of his Yankee contract after the 2012 season, Robertson was again the favorite to replace Mariano, who announced in spring training that the 2013 season would be his last one. I believed D-Rob would benefit from his first attempt at closer and be much better prepared mentally to take over the role the next time he was given the opportunity. After another very strong year as Mo’s eighth-inning set-up guy in 2013, its too early to tell if that will be the case.

Robertson did get his first two saves of the 2014 season without much of a problem but he also suffered a groin injury in the process of earning that second one, which put him back on the DL. I am now officially concerned about this guy’s physical frailty. Does he have the strength and stamina to withstand the rigors of being a big league closer? We shall see.

Robertson was born in Birmingham, AL, on April 9, 1985. He was a 17th round pick for New York in the 2006 draft.

Ten years before Robertson joined the Yankee bullpen, this lefty reliever, also born on April 9th, was a key member of New York’s relief corps. This long-ago starting pitcher also shares D-Rob’s birthday.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2008 NYY 4 0 1.000 5.34 25 0 8 0 0 0 30.1 29 18 18 3 15 36 1.451
2009 NYY 2 1 .667 3.30 45 0 20 0 0 1 43.2 36 19 16 4 23 63 1.351
2010 NYY 4 5 .444 3.82 64 0 10 0 0 1 61.1 59 26 26 5 33 71 1.500
2011 NYY 4 0 1.000 1.08 70 0 8 0 0 1 66.2 40 9 8 1 35 100 1.125
2012 NYY 2 7 .222 2.67 65 0 17 0 0 2 60.2 52 19 18 5 19 81 1.170
2013 NYY 5 1 .833 2.04 70 0 9 0 0 3 66.1 51 15 15 5 18 77 1.040
2014 NYY 0 0 0.00 3 0 3 0 0 2 3.0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0.667
7 Yrs 21 14 .600 2.74 342 0 75 0 0 10 332.0 268 106 101 23 144 429 1.241
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/23/2014.

March 30 – Happy Birthday Dick Woodson

The only former Yankee celebrating a birthday today is a big right hander named Dick Woodson, who appeared in just eight games for New York during the 1974 season and then left the big leagues. Woodson did all of his other pitching for the Twins. I can actually remember when he broke into their rotation. Back then, Minnesota had a young Bert Blyleven, veteran Jim Perry and one of my all-time favorite Yankee announcers, Jim “Kitty” Kaat, as starters. Those three guys had a total of 785 regular season victories between them. Woodson won 14 games as a Twin starter in 1972 and 10 more the following season. Then in May of 1974, Minnesota swapped Woodson for a lefthanded pitching prospect named Mike Pazik, who had been the Yankees first round pick in the 1971 draft. Neither pitcher performed well for their new teams. Woodson had actually torn his rotator cuff before the trade and back in those days, that injury ended a pitcher’s career.

Woodson did, however, play a significant role in baseball history when, in 1974 he was handpicked by the legendary Marvin Miller to become the first Major League Player to go through the newly established arbitration process. Miller had studied every eligible player’s contract and discovered Woodson was the most underpaid player in baseball. At the time, the Twins stingy owner, Calvin Griffith was paying the pitcher $15,000 and had offered him a $2,000 raise after a 14-victory season. Miller’s minions had discovered that pitchers with similar stats were making two and even three times more than Woodson was being offered. Woodson’s arbitration starting point was $30,000 and he won his case easily.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1974 NYY 1 2 .333 5.79 8 3 2 0 0 0 28.0 34 19 18 6 12 12 1.643
5 Yrs 34 32 .515 3.47 137 76 18 15 5 2 589.0 522 263 227 55 253 315 1.316
MIN (5 yrs) 33 30 .524 3.35 129 73 16 15 5 2 561.0 488 244 209 49 241 303 1.299
NYY (1 yr) 1 2 .333 5.79 8 3 2 0 0 0 28.0 34 19 18 6 12 12 1.643
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/16/2014.