Results tagged ‘ relief pitcher ’

June 2 – Happy Birthday Mike Stanton

stantonMike Stanton was a key cog in a great Yankee bullpen that helped the team win three straight World Championships, beginning in1998. A left-hander, this native of Houston, Texas didn’t begin pitching until he got to college but mastered the art quick enough to get selected in the 13th round of the 1987 MLB amateur draft by the Atlanta Braves. He made his big league debut with the Braves two years later and impressed the organization by saving 7 ball games, compiling a 1.50 ERA and striking out more than a hitter an inning during his 20-game first-ever trial.

Stanton spent six-plus seasons in Atlanta, including 1993, when he became the team’s closer and saved a career high 27 games. He lost the closer’s job to Greg McMichael the following year and was traded to the Red Sox at the mid-season trading deadline in 1995.

The Yankees signed him as a free agent following the 1996 season and for the next half-dozen years, he was Joe Torre’s first southpaw choice out of the bullpen. He had a good, moving fastball and when his slider and curveball were working, this guy was simply nasty, especially on left-handed hitters. I loved his toughness and no-nonsense demeanor on the mound. He was the type of pitcher who believed he could get any hitter out in any situation. Though you couldn’t prove it by his rather high ERA while in pinstripes, Stanton got lots of key outs during that unforgettable string of three straight Yankee championships.

His best season in the Bronx was probably his first. In 1997, he appeared in 64 games and went 6-1 with a sparkling 2.57 ERA. Though the Yankees didn’t make it to the Fall Classic that year, they did formulate one of the franchise’s all-time great relief corps by putting Mariano Rivera in the closer role and teaming Stanton with Ramiro Mendoza, Jeff Nelson, and Graeme Lloyd as his set-up men. For the next three years, a Yankee lead in the sixth inning was safer than the gold in Fort Knox.

Though he went 7-1 during the final season of his contract with the Yanks in 2002, he had turned 35 and when Brian Cashman didn’t go after him hard, Stanton ended up signing with the Mets. Two years later, he returned to the Yankees in a trade but the magic was gone. When he retired after the 2007 season he held the record for most “Holds” by a big league reliever.

Stanton shares his birthday with this former Yankee SS/Mgr/GM,  this postseason hero from 2012 and  this former Yankee second baseman.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1997 NYY 6 1 .857 2.57 64 0 15 0 0 3 66.2 50 19 19 3 34 70 1.260
1998 NYY 4 1 .800 5.47 67 0 26 0 0 6 79.0 71 51 48 13 26 69 1.228
1999 NYY 2 2 .500 4.33 73 1 10 0 0 0 62.1 71 30 30 5 18 59 1.428
2000 NYY 2 3 .400 4.10 69 0 20 0 0 0 68.0 68 32 31 5 24 75 1.353
2001 ★ NYY 9 4 .692 2.58 76 0 16 0 0 0 80.1 80 25 23 4 29 78 1.357
2002 NYY 7 1 .875 3.00 79 0 25 0 0 6 78.0 73 29 26 4 28 44 1.295
2005 NYY 1 2 .333 7.07 28 0 6 0 0 0 14.0 17 11 11 1 6 12 1.643
19 Yrs 68 63 .519 3.92 1178 1 363 0 0 84 1114.0 1086 523 485 93 420 895 1.352
ATL (7 yrs) 18 21 .462 4.01 304 0 123 0 0 55 289.2 277 146 129 22 114 223 1.350
NYY (7 yrs) 31 14 .689 3.77 456 1 118 0 0 15 448.1 430 197 188 35 165 407 1.327
BOS (3 yrs) 5 3 .625 3.56 82 0 31 0 0 1 78.1 76 33 31 12 31 57 1.366
NYM (2 yrs) 4 13 .235 3.68 133 0 43 0 0 5 122.1 107 57 50 12 52 92 1.300
WSN (2 yrs) 5 6 .455 4.13 86 0 13 0 0 0 72.0 78 35 33 3 30 44 1.500
SFG (1 yr) 4 2 .667 3.09 26 0 15 0 0 8 23.1 23 8 8 1 6 18 1.243
TEX (1 yr) 0 1 .000 3.22 22 0 9 0 0 0 22.1 20 8 8 2 4 14 1.075
CIN (1 yr) 1 3 .250 5.93 69 0 11 0 0 0 57.2 75 39 38 6 18 40 1.613
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/16/2014.

May 28 – Happy Birthday Cory Wade

One of the true bright spots of the Yankees 2012 season was the performance of their bullpen. If someone told you at the beginning of that year’s spring training camp that Mariano Rivera, Joba Chamberlain and David Robertson would all be on the DL at the same time but their absence would have little negative impact on the quality of New York’s relief pitching, you’d call that person crazy. But that’s exactly what happened. Raffie Soriano, Boone Logan, Clay Rapada and Cody Eppley all stepped up big time and got a huge early-season assist from today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant.

Through the middle of June Cory Wade appeared in 27 games for New York that season and pitched 27 innings. He has struck out 30 hitters, walked just 5 and allowed only 8e earned runs for an ERA of 2.63. He wasn’t really a flash in the pan for New York either. In 2011, this right-handed native of Indianapolis appeared in 40 games for the Yankees, went 6-1 with an ERA of just 2.04.

Unfortunately for Wade and the 2012 Yankees, his pitching fell apart during the second half of June. When he gave up a total 10 earned runs in his final two appearances that month, New York skipper Joe Girardi lost confidence in the pitcher and he was demoted to Scranton.

Wade came up to the big leagues with the Dodgers in 2008 and pitched well for Manager Joe Torre. He then injured his shoulder in 2009 and required surgery. The Dodgers released him and he signed with Tampa but never pitched an inning for the Rays. The Yankees signed him in June of 2011 and with his arm completely healed, Wade’s been pitching well ever since. He’s not a hard thrower. His fastball tops out at about 90 miles per hour but he has very good command of four different pitches and has been mixing speeds masterfully since he donned the pinstripes. Let’s hope it continues.

Wade was called back up by New York for the 2012 stretch run and pitched OK but not great. He was then left off the Yankees’ postseason roster and put on waivers that October. He’s now pitching in the Royals’ minor league system.

Wade shares his May 28th birthday with another very effective Yankee relief pitcher from the 1950s. 

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2011 NYY 6 1 .857 2.04 40 0 8 0 0 0 39.2 33 10 9 5 8 30 1.034
2012 NYY 1 1 .500 6.46 39 0 7 0 0 0 39.0 46 29 28 8 8 38 1.385
4 Yrs 11 6 .647 3.65 161 0 38 0 0 0 177.2 158 78 72 23 41 137 1.120
LAD (2 yrs) 4 4 .500 3.18 82 0 23 0 0 0 99.0 79 39 35 10 25 69 1.051
NYY (2 yrs) 7 2 .778 4.23 79 0 15 0 0 0 78.2 79 39 37 13 16 68 1.208
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/28/2013.

May 4 – Happy Birthday Joe Borowski

I was busy last evening and missed most of the Yankee game so when I sat down to write this blog at around 10:00 pm the first thing I did was check for the score of the game on ESPN NY. That’s when I learned about Mariano Rivera twisting his knee while shagging outfield flies in batting practice. After I cursed like a sailor, kicked the dog and screamed at my wife (I’m kidding, I don’t own a dog) I started thinking about just how durable Rivera has been during the seventeen seasons the Yankees have trusted no one else with ninth inning leads.

 I’ll never forget thinking the Yankee front office was crazy for letting John Wetteland walk away as a free agent after he had saved 43 games during the 1996 regular season and all four of the Yankees’ victories in that year’s World Series. But it turned out he was just the first of many. What do Bob Wickman, David Weathers, Mark Wohlers, Tom Gordon, Octavio Dotel, Kerry Ward, Armando Benitez, and Rafael Soriano all have in common? Not only did they pitch in the same Yankee bullpen as the great Sandman, each of them has had 30-save seasons in the big leagues either before or after they became Mo’s teammate. Mo has been so good for so long that no other 30-save big league closer has ever had even the slightest chance of taking away his job. And that includes today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant.

Like Mariano, Joe Borowski also began his big league career in 1995. The Orioles brought him up in July and he appeared in six games as a reliever that season. He spent the next year with the Braves but did not make their postseason roster so he missed the opportunity to compete against Mo and the Yankees in the ’96 Series. The following September Atlanta waived him and the Yankees picked him up. In 1998, he spent most of the season in Columbus but was called up to the Bronx in August. With the exception of one pounding he took against Texas, this right-handed native of Bayonne, NJ pitched real well, surrendering just a single run in his seven other appearances for New York. The Yankees let him go in September of 1999 and he didn’t get back to the big leagues until late in the 2001 season as a member of the Cubs. In 2002, he finally got a chance to pitch regularly at the big league level, when he appeared in 73 games for Chicago, won four of eight decisions, had an ERA of 2.73 and garnered his first two big league saves. That effort gave Cub Manager Dusty Baker the confidence he needed to give Borowski a shot at closing in 2003 and big Joe did not disappoint. He saved 33 games that year, lowered his ERA to 2.63 and was a big reason why the Cubbies made it to the postseason.

Chicago rewarded him with a two-year, four million dollar contract that off season and Borowski went out and tore his rotator cuff. The next year he broke his hand. He did not fully recover from those injuries until 2006 and by then he was pitching for the Marlins and getting paid the league minimum. But after he saved 33 games for Florida, the Indians signed him as a free agent with a two-year deal worth eight million dollars. Borowski helped Cleveland win the AL Central Division in 2007 by leading the League with 45 saves. The odd thing about his performance that season was that he was able to save so many games despite compiling an ERA north of five. When the 2008 season opened, Borowski got off to a horrible start, forcing Cleveland to first take his closer job away and then in July of that year, giving him his outright release. By then Borowski was 37 years old. He shares his May 4th birthday with this former Yankee infielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1997 NYY 0 1 .000 9.00 1 0 1 0 0 0 2.0 2 2 2 0 4 2 3.000
1998 NYY 1 0 1.000 6.52 8 0 6 0 0 0 9.2 11 7 7 0 4 7 1.552
12 Yrs 22 34 .393 4.18 423 1 268 0 0 131 454.1 450 222 211 53 177 372 1.380
CHC (5 yrs) 8 11 .421 3.73 175 1 106 0 0 44 198.0 182 87 82 24 67 192 1.258
ATL (2 yrs) 4 6 .400 4.32 42 0 16 0 0 0 50.0 60 26 24 6 29 21 1.780
CLE (2 yrs) 5 8 .385 5.57 87 0 72 0 0 51 82.1 101 53 51 13 25 67 1.530
NYY (2 yrs) 1 1 .500 6.94 9 0 7 0 0 0 11.2 13 9 9 0 8 9 1.800
TBD (1 yr) 1 5 .167 3.82 32 0 4 0 0 0 35.1 26 15 15 3 11 16 1.047
FLA (1 yr) 3 3 .500 3.75 72 0 60 0 0 36 69.2 63 31 29 7 33 64 1.378
BAL (1 yr) 0 0 1.23 6 0 3 0 0 0 7.1 5 1 1 0 4 3 1.227
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/4/2014.