Results tagged ‘ plowboy ’

May 20 – Happy Birthday Tom Morgan

MorganOne of the things the Yankees did not seem to need after winning the 1950 World Series was starting pitching. Their rotation was loaded with the glorious triumvirate of Vic Raschi, Allie Reynolds and Eddie Lopat,15-game winner Tommy Byrne and a cocky rookie southpaw named Whitey Ford. But Ford would miss the entire 1951 season to military service and Byrne, who always had control problems suddenly couldn’t find the plate. That made room in the rotation for a rookie Yankee left-hander named Tom Morgan. Casey Stengel let the 20-year-old native of El Monte, California start 16 times during that ’51 season and he went 6-3 in those games, including two shutouts. He also relieved in 11 other games that year and earned two saves.

Morgan credited two guys for helping him become a successful big league pitcher. The first was his younger brother Dick, who became a minor league catcher himself. Tom would spend hours throwing a baseball to his sibling in the yard of their California home and he credited those sessions  for helping him master control of his very good fastball. He also used to say that his Yankee pitching coach, Jim Turner was instrumental in helping him master both a sidearm curve and change up, giving him the confidence he needed to throw those pitches whenever he needed to at the big league level.

Morgan’s most distinctive physical trait was the way he walked. He’d bend his body at the waist, hunch his shoulders and take his steps slowly, looking as if he was always pulling something behind him. As a result, the Grand Annointer of pinstriped nicknames, Yankee announcer Mel Allen gave Morgan the nickname of “the Plowboy.”

Morgan started 12 more times in 1952 and then missed the entire ’53 season to military service. When he returned to action in 1954, Stengel began using him more out of the bullpen and he had his best season in pinstripes with an 11-5 record and a 3.34 ERA. He was then converted to a full-time reliever and over the next two seasons he saved 21 games for New York. But his ERA climbed dramatically in 1956 and the following February he was included in a humungous deal with the A’s that eventually caused 13 players to exchange uniforms.

After one year in Kansas City, Morgan spent two-and-a-half years with the Tigers and a half season as a Senator. The expansion Angels purchased him in 1961 and he surprised everyone by putting together two very strong years out of the Angels bullpen. He couldn’t keep the string going, however, and he was done as a player after the ’63 season. He then became a minor league pitching instructor with the Angels and scouted for the Yankees. He eventually became the Angels’ big league pitching coach and later held that same position with the Padres. Cy Young Award winners Nolan Ryan and Randy Jones credited Morgan with helping them become all star pitchers. He was still coaching at the minor league level when he suffered a stroke and died of a heart attack in 1987 at the age of 56.

Morgan shares his May 20th birthday with one of my favorite all-time Yankees, this very good Yankee pitcher, and this other Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO HBP WHIP
1951 NYY 9 3 .750 3.68 27 16 7 4 2 2 124.2 119 56 51 11 36 57 3 1.243
1952 NYY 5 4 .556 3.07 16 12 3 2 1 2 93.2 86 34 32 8 33 35 4 1.270
1953 Did not play in major leagues (Military Service)
1954 NYY 11 5 .688 3.34 32 17 4 7 4 1 143.0 149 58 53 8 40 34 5 1.322
1955 NYY 7 3 .700 3.25 40 1 24 0 0 10 72.0 72 29 26 3 24 17 5 1.333
1956 NYY 6 7 .462 4.16 41 0 23 0 0 11 71.1 74 41 33 2 27 20 3 1.416
12 Yrs 67 47 .588 3.61 443 61 204 18 7 64 1023.1 1040 467 410 95 300 364 40 1.309
NYY (5 yrs) 38 22 .633 3.48 156 46 61 13 7 26 504.2 500 218 195 32 160 163 20 1.308
LAA (3 yrs) 13 4 .765 2.86 120 0 64 0 0 20 166.2 147 65 53 14 42 75 9 1.134
DET (3 yrs) 6 11 .353 3.81 107 2 49 0 0 11 184.1 197 93 78 24 32 83 7 1.242
WSH (1 yr) 1 3 .250 3.75 14 0 6 0 0 0 24.0 36 15 10 6 5 11 1 1.708
KCA (1 yr) 9 7 .563 4.64 46 13 24 5 0 7 143.2 160 76 74 19 61 32 3 1.538
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/20/2013.