Results tagged ‘ pitcher ’

June 28 – Happy Birthday Fred Talbot

It was June of 1966 and the New York Yankees were dissolving faster than a wet Alka Seltzer. Two season’s earlier, the team had fallen three runs short of winning a World Series, but here they were, just twenty month’s later, floundering in seventh place in the AL standings. Everybody knew they needed major help immediately and that included their competition. It was fun for the other AL teams to watch the once mighty Yankees get their comeuppance. Even if their own ball clubs were in need of players, no other AL franchise was willing to help much with New York’s retooling effort via a trade except of course the good old Kansas City A’s. But unlike in years past when the A’s would serve up outstanding talent like Roger Maris, Clete Boyer and Hector Lopez to their Big Apple brethren, Kansas City’s front office had been taken over by the eccentric and extremely stingy Charley Finley in the early sixties. Well aware that the Yankees had exploited the A’s in previous player transactions, Finley refused to even deal with New York for years and when he finally did, the trades were no longer one-sided affairs.

So when a deal between the Yankees and A’s was made in June of 1966, instead of being announced with a bold back page headline in the New York City tabloids, it received a paragraph at the end of that day’s Yankee game recap. “The Yankees traded their former starting pitcher Bill Stafford, outfielder Roger Repoz and reliever Gil Blanco  to Kansas City today in exchange for A’s catcher Bill Bryan and starting pitcher Fred Talbot.”

As things turned out, it was one of those trades that had little impact on either team. Talbot was immediately inserted into the Yankees’ starting rotation. He would go 7-7 for the Yankees during the balance of the 1966 season and then 6-8 the following year. But his ERA was north of four both those seasons and in 1968 he was demoted to the Yankee bullpen. He did worse as a reliever, finishing the year at 1-9. The Yankees traded him to the Pilots in 1969, getting Jack Aker in return, who turned out to be a great closer for New York during the next three seasons. Talbot, on the other hand did little for the Pilots except become fodder for Jim Bouton’s best-selling “Ball Four” chronology of the Pilot’s 1969 season. He then found himself back pitching with the A’s in 1970 and ’71, his final two big league seasons. He finished his 8-year career with a 38-56 record. Update: Talbot passed away on January 11, 2013, at the age of 71.

Talbot was born on the same exact date as this former AL strikeout leader and also shares a birthday with this former AL MVP and this one-time back-up Yankee first baseman.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1966 NYY 7 7 .500 4.13 23 19 2 3 0 0 124.1 123 59 57 16 45 48 1.351
1967 NYY 6 8 .429 4.22 29 22 3 2 0 0 138.2 132 78 65 20 54 61 1.341
1968 NYY 1 9 .100 3.36 29 11 7 1 0 0 99.0 89 47 37 6 42 67 1.323
1969 NYY 0 0 5.11 8 0 2 0 0 0 12.1 13 9 7 1 6 7 1.541
8 Yrs 38 56 .404 4.12 195 126 26 12 4 1 853.2 844 431 391 96 334 449 1.380
NYY (4 yrs) 14 24 .368 3.99 89 52 14 6 0 0 374.1 357 193 166 43 147 183 1.346
OAK (4 yrs) 15 19 .441 4.40 63 46 10 2 1 1 286.1 277 148 140 34 122 163 1.393
CHW (2 yrs) 4 5 .444 3.68 18 12 0 3 2 0 78.1 85 32 32 7 24 36 1.391
SEP (1 yr) 5 8 .385 4.16 25 16 2 1 1 0 114.2 125 58 53 12 41 67 1.448
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/28/2013.

June 13 – Happy Birthday Darrell May

The only Yankee player in history to be born on June 13th was a journeyman pitcher named Darrell May. The Yankees picked May up from the Padres in July of 2005 in exchange for another reliever named Paul Quantrill. May had made his big league debut in 1995 for the Braves but by 1997, he had pitched his way back to the minor leagues. The Royals brought him back to the Majors in 2002 and he was a member of the Kansas City starting rotation for three seasons. His best year was 2003 when he went 10-8 for KC with a career low ERA of 3.77. The following year, May led the League in losses with 19 and he was traded to the Padres. He went 1-3 in San Diego before getting dealt for Quantrill and he made just two appearances in pinstripes, getting rocked each time and he lost his only decision as a Yankee. He pitched in the minors for one more year then hung his glove up for good.

May was born on this date in 1972, in San Bernardino, CA. The most famous ballplayer and only Hall of Famer ever born in that same city was the great big league pitcher and former Yankee manager, Bob Lemon. Darrell became the third player named “May” to play in pinstripes joining pitcher Rudy May and outfielder/DH Carlos May.

Over the years, several players have played for both the Yankees and Padres during their careers. Here’s my all-time best lineup of guys who played for both San Diego and New York. (*) Note that four members of this group are now in the Hall of Fame:

1B – Jack Clark
2B – Mark Bellhorn
3B – Graig Nettles
SS – Tony Fernandez
C – John Flaherty
OF – Dave Winfield*
OF – Ricky Henderson*
OF – Jerry Mumphrey
P – David Wells
P – Gaylord Perry*
CL – Goose Gossage*

Here’s Darrell May’s Yankee and career stats:

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2005 NYY 0 1 .000 16.71 2 1 0 0 0 0 7.0 14 13 13 4 3 3 2.429
7 Yrs 26 43 .377 5.16 161 97 23 7 3 0 660.2 746 411 379 123 212 414 1.450
KCR (3 yrs) 23 37 .383 4.81 96 84 4 7 3 0 527.1 575 311 282 97 158 330 1.390
ANA (2 yrs) 2 1 .667 5.47 34 2 9 0 0 0 54.1 59 34 33 7 27 43 1.583
PIT (1 yr) 0 1 .000 9.35 5 2 0 0 0 0 8.2 15 10 9 5 4 5 2.192
ATL (1 yr) 0 0 11.25 2 0 1 0 0 0 4.0 10 5 5 0 0 1 2.500
SDP (1 yr) 1 3 .250 5.61 22 8 9 0 0 0 59.1 73 38 37 10 20 32 1.567
NYY (1 yr) 0 1 .000 16.71 2 1 0 0 0 0 7.0 14 13 13 4 3 3 2.429
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/13/2013.

June 5 – Happy Birthday Jack Chesbro

When I first started following baseball in 1960, New York Yankees dominated the record book. Babe Ruth’s single season and career home run records, Lou Gehrig’s consecutive games played, Joe DiMaggio’s hitting streak and Jack Chesbro’s most wins in a season marks were all considered unbreakable. One year later, Maris hit 61 but that was OK by me because he was a Yankee. Then Aaron grabbed the Babe’s other record, Ripken replaced the Iron Horse, and a juiced up McGuire eclipsed Maris. That leaves just DiMaggio’s 56 games and Chesbro’s 41 victories still Pinstripe property.

I do believe that the Clipper’s hitting streak will fall some day in the not too distant future but Happy Jack’s victory mark will withstand the test of time. The ironic thing about Chesbro’s 41-win season in 1904 was that he too used juice to help him set the mark. But his juice came out of his mouth instead of a syringe and was applied to a baseball instead of being injected into his butt. Jack had one of baseball’s best spitballs and in 1904 he used it to near perfection. Just like steroids’ impact on the the human body however, foreign substances applied to a baseball can have disastrous side effects. One of the spitters Chesbro threw during the 1904 season finale against the Red Sox fluttered so much it got past the New York catcher and the winning run scored, costing the Highlanders the pennant.

Chesbro pitched seven seasons for New York with a cumulative record of 128-93. His total big league career lasted 11 years and his lifetime record was 198-132. That 40-victory season got him elected to the Hall of Fame by the old-timers committee in 1946.

Chesbro shares his June 5th birthday with a couple of former Yankee catchers nicknamed “Duke” and “Truck.”

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO HBP WHIP
1903 NYY 21 15 .583 2.77 40 36 4 33 1 0 324.2 300 140 100 7 74 147 9 1.152
1904 NYY 41 12 .774 1.82 55 51 3 48 6 0 454.2 338 128 92 4 88 239 7 0.937
1905 NYY 19 15 .559 2.20 41 38 2 24 3 0 303.1 262 125 74 5 71 156 6 1.098
1906 NYY 23 17 .575 2.96 49 42 7 24 4 1 325.0 314 138 107 2 75 152 10 1.197
1907 NYY 10 10 .500 2.53 30 25 3 17 1 0 206.0 192 83 58 0 46 78 6 1.155
1908 NYY 14 20 .412 2.93 45 31 13 20 3 1 288.2 276 134 94 6 67 124 14 1.188
1909 NYY 0 4 .000 6.34 9 4 4 2 0 0 49.2 70 47 35 2 13 17 3 1.671
11 Yrs 198 132 .600 2.68 392 332 52 260 35 5 2896.2 2647 1206 864 39 690 1265 113 1.152
NYY (7 yrs) 128 93 .579 2.58 269 227 36 168 18 2 1952.0 1752 795 560 26 434 913 55 1.120
PIT (4 yrs) 70 38 .648 2.89 122 104 16 92 17 3 938.2 888 407 301 12 252 349 58 1.214
BOS (1 yr) 0 1 .000 4.50 1 1 0 0 0 0 6.0 7 4 3 1 4 3 0 1.833
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/5/2013.