Results tagged ‘ pinch hitter ’

November 1 – Happy Birthday Ham Hyatt

Ham-HyattHis full name was Robert Hamilton Hyatt. Fred Leib, one of a small group of widely read sportswriters who helped give early 20th century New York City baseball its amazing color, described today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant as “one of the game’s greatest pinch-hitters.” If Leib wrote it, it must have been true.

Ham Hamilton was the first player in baseball history to amass 50 pinch-hits during his career. The native of North Carolina made his big league debut with the 1909 World Champion Pittsburgh Pirates and instantly exhibited a penchant for coming off the bench in key situations and delivering big hits. He averaged .299 that year and in the process he impressed Fred Clarke enough with his stick work that the Pittsburgh manager tried to make him the team’s starting first baseman the following season. That experiment failed because in addition to being a poor defensive player, Hyatt just didn’t seem to hit as well when he got more than one chance per game to do so.

Probably because the Pirates didn’t think they could afford the luxury of carrying a full-time pinch-hitter, Hyatt went back to the minors in 1911. He would reappear in Pittsburgh the following season however and remained with the team as their primary pinch-hitter for the next three years. When his average took a precipitous dip to just .215 in 1915, the Pirates put him on waivers and he was claimed by the Cardinals. It was in St. Louis that Hyatt met future Yankee manager Miller Huggins, who was the starting second baseman on that 1915 St. Louis team. The two men became good friends.

Three years later, Huggins was in his first season as manager for New York and with World War I causing a shortage of ballplayers, Hug needed a left handed bat for his bench. At the time, Hyatt’s contract was owned by the Boston Braves but he was playing for a minor league team in the Southern Association and leading that league in home runs. When the Yankees were able to purchase his contract from the Braves in June of that 1918 season, the one-time Cardinal teammates were reunited. Huggins gave his old buddy plenty of playing time but Ham was 33-years-old by then and could only manage a .229 batting average during his  first season in New York. There would be no second season. Hyatt would end up playing in the Pacific Coast League until 1923, finally retiring for good at the age of 38.

Ham Hyatt shares his birthday with another WWI era Yankee.

Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
NYY 53 142 131 11 30 8 0 2 10 1 8 8 .229 .273 .336 .609
7 Yrs 465 1012 925 85 247 36 23 10 146 11 63 87 .267 .321 .388 .709
PIT (5 yrs) 306 540 499 51 138 20 14 6 90 7 27 55 .277 .323 .409 .732
STL (1 yr) 106 330 295 23 79 8 9 2 46 3 28 24 .268 .337 .376 .714
NYY (1 yr) 53 142 131 11 30 8 0 2 10 1 8 8 .229 .273 .336 .609
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/31/2013.

February 6 – Happy Birthday Dale Long

longDale Long was born in Springfield, Missouri on February 6, 1926 and then moved to Massachusetts as a young boy. A multi-talented athlete as a youngster, he starred in semi-pro football and turned down an opportunity to sign with the Green Bay Packers to give a career in baseball a shot. That career started in 1944, when Long joined the Milwaukee Brewers, then a non-affiliated double A franchise in the American Association being managed at the time by Casey Stengel. During the next ten seasons, Long spent time with fourteen different minor league ball clubs in the organizations of five different Major League teams. In 1951, he made his big league debut as a member of the Pittsburgh Pirates, where GM Branch Rickey was determined to convert Long into a left-handed catcher. That experiment lasted two pitches. He ended up on waivers that year and spent four more seasons trying to get back to the big dance.

His second chance came in 1955, again with the Pirates. This time Long was ready. He averaged .291 with 16 home runs, 79 RBIs and led all of baseball with his 13 triples. The following year, Long swung his way into baseball history when he hit home runs in eight consecutive games. That stretch of power made him a national celebrity and his 27 home runs and 91 RBIs that season made him a National League All Star.

After a slow start in 1957, Long was traded to the Cubs and after three seasons in the Windy City, he was sold to the Giants just as the 1960 regular season was beginning. In August of that year, Yankee GM George Weiss was looking for some left-handed power to add to Casey Stengel’s bench and he purchased Long from San Francisco. At the time the deal was made, the big guy was hitting just .167 but when he got to the Bronx, he went on a tear. He hit a robust .366 in his 46 at bats with New York that year and made the Yankees’ postseason roster, getting a hit in three pinch-hitting appearances against his former Pirate teammates in the 1960 World Series.

Long was a left-handed pull hitter who’s stroke was perfect for reaching the short porch down the old Yankee Stadium’s right field line. New York really loved having him as a pinch hitter but they had too many other stars and prospects in their employ to protect Long during the 1960 AL Expansion Draft. Sure enough, the Senators selected the veteran slugger with the 28th pick and he became the new Washington franchise’s first starting first baseman during their inaugural 1961 season. In July of 1962, the Yankees were once again in need of a left-handed pinch hitter and they offered the Senators a very good right-hand-hitting outfielder prospect from their farm system by the name of Don Lock in exchange for Long. Washington jumped at the offer and Lock became their team’s starting center fielder for the next half-decade. Long again came through in his role as a Yankee pinch-hitter and Moose Skowren’s back-up at first base. In 41 games he averaged .298 with 4 home runs and 17 RBIs. He again got to play in a World Series and this time won his first and only ring when the Yankees defeated the Giants in the 1962 Fall Classic.

By the time the 1963 season rolled around, Long had reached 37 years of age and his bat and his body were slowing down. He was hitting just .200 that August, when the Yankees released him and his big league career was over. Years later, Long became a sports announcer for a local television station in my viewing area. He died in 1991, a victim of a heart attack at the age of 64.

Long shares his birthday with a Yankee God and this former Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1960 NYY 26 46 41 6 15 3 1 3 10 0 5 6 .366 .435 .707 1.142
1962 NYY 41 113 94 12 28 4 0 4 17 1 18 9 .298 .404 .468 .872
1963 NYY 14 16 15 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 .200 .250 .200 .450
10 Yrs 1013 3430 3020 384 805 135 33 132 467 10 353 460 .267 .341 .464 .805
PIT (4 yrs) 296 1100 970 124 264 40 20 44 176 1 106 170 .272 .339 .491 .830
CHC (3 yrs) 375 1342 1173 157 321 55 7 55 174 3 149 180 .274 .354 .473 .827
NYY (3 yrs) 81 175 150 19 46 7 1 7 27 1 24 18 .307 .398 .507 .904
WSA (2 yrs) 190 636 568 69 140 28 4 21 73 5 57 63 .246 .313 .421 .734
SFG (1 yr) 37 61 54 4 9 0 0 3 6 0 7 7 .167 .262 .333 .596
SLB (1 yr) 34 116 105 11 25 5 1 2 11 0 10 22 .238 .310 .362 .672
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/18/2014.

July 18 – Happy Birthday Johnny Hopp

Back in the late forties and early fifties, Yankee GM George Weiss would scour the rosters of the 15 other big league teams looking for what the New York media liked to call “pennant insurance.” With the platoon master, Casey Stengel calling the shots on the field in the Bronx, Weiss knew that providing the Ol’ Perfessor with one good extra bat or pitching arm was the recipe for a few extra late-season wins and quite possibly another trip to the Fall Classic. In August of 1949, Weiss had grabbed the “Big Cat,” Johnny Mize from the cross town Giants for $40,000 dollars. The primary reason the former NL batting champion was available in the first place was because Giant manager Leo Durocher was not very fond of him. When Weiss gave Mize to Stengel, Casey used him masterfully as a pinch hitter and part-time first baseman for the next five Yankee seasons.

A year after getting Mize, Weiss spent another 40,000 Yankee dollars to get Johnny Hopp from the Pirates. Hopp had been a teammate of Mize’s when both played and starred for the Cardinals early in their careers. Though he didn’t have lots of power, Hopp was a great defensive first baseman, a better-than-average center fielder and a solid batsman who turned pitches into line drives with great regularity. In fact, when Weiss swung the deal to put him in pinstripes, Hopp was hitting .340. The national baseball press howled that the mysterious Weiss was somehow using the financial might of the Yankees to form a cabal of MLB owners willing to sell New York any player needed to fill a gap in the team’s roster. In actuality, no NL team in the pennant race at the time of the Hopp transaction wanted or needed a first baseman who could not hit for power. But Stengel welcomed him with open arms into his toolbox, which was more commonly referred to as the Yankee dugout.

During the final month of the 1950 regular season, Hopp appeared in 19 games for New York and hit .333 with a .486 on base percentage. His timely hitting helped the Yankees hold off a very good Detroit Tiger team to win that year’s pennant by just three games. In 1951, Hopp’s age (35 at the time) began to catch up with him as injuries limited his play and had a negative impact on his batting average. The Hastings, Nebraska native was given his outright release the following year and he finished his big league career as a member of the Tigers. He retired with a .296 lifetime batting average and four World Series rings, two each with the Cardinals and Yankees.

Hopp shares his July 18th birthday with this former Yankee Managerthis one-time Yankee starting pitcher and this Yankee utility infielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1950 NYY 19 35 27 9 9 2 1 1 8 0 8 1 .333 .486 .593 1.078
1951 NYY 46 73 63 10 13 1 0 2 4 2 9 11 .206 .306 .317 .623
1952 NYY 15 28 25 4 4 0 0 0 2 2 2 3 .160 .250 .160 .410
14 Yrs 1393 4805 4260 698 1262 216 74 46 458 128 464 378 .296 .368 .414 .782
STL (7 yrs) 669 2401 2129 355 619 116 41 24 244 69 227 218 .291 .362 .418 .779
PIT (3 yrs) 331 1208 1081 170 335 53 22 14 117 21 120 71 .310 .379 .438 .818
NYY (3 yrs) 80 136 115 23 26 3 1 3 14 4 19 15 .226 .341 .348 .689
BSN (2 yrs) 263 993 875 145 272 43 10 5 80 34 92 64 .311 .381 .400 .781
BRO (1 yr) 8 14 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 .000 .000 .000 .000
DET (1 yr) 42 53 46 5 10 1 0 0 3 0 6 7 .217 .308 .239 .547
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/18/2013.