Results tagged ‘ outfielder ’

January 10 – Happy Birthday Bob Brower

browerToday’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant is the only ex-Yankee no longer playing the game, who still thanks Scott Boras every time he gets his paycheck. Bob Brower was one of the most versatile athletes ever to graduate from Brooklyn’s James Madison High School and was the very first one to letter in four varsity sports in a single school year. Though he was only five feet eleven inches tall and weighed 185 pounds, he could hit baseballs amazingly long distances. He attended Duke University on a football scholarship but gave it up to play baseball for the Blue Devils as a walk-on.

He signed with the Rangers in 1982 as an un-drafted free agent and made his big league debut with Texas, four years later. He worked his way into the team’s fourth outfielder slot by 1987 and put together his best big league season that year, hitting 14 home runs and averaging .261. When he slumped the following season, Texas traded him to the Yankees for shortstop Bobby Meacham.

A month after the Yankees acquired Bower, Claudell Washington, New York’s starting center fielder in 1988, signed a free agent deal with the Angels. That meant Brower would compete for the job in his first Yankee spring training camp against two other young Yankee outfielders, Roberto Kelly and Stanley Jefferson. Brower’s playing time prospects grew even brighter when it was announced that Dave Winfield’s bad back would force him to sit out the entire ’89 season.

Unfortunately for Brower, his exhibition season effort was hampered by a sore groin and a tender throwing shoulder. When the season started, he found himself on the disabled list and it was Kelly who started in center. and veteran Gary Ward in right. Dallas Green, the Yankee skipper that season, gave Brower his chance two weeks later and he seemed ready to take advantage of it. He had five hits in his first four games in pinstripes, his batting average was .385 and he had scored three runs. But the good hitting wouldn’t last and when he began to press at the plate, his defense also suffered. In a mid-May game against California, he committed two costly errors in the outfield and then got picked off first base with the Yankees trailing 4-0. Green, who by then was suffering under the full wrath of Boss Steinbrenner, expressed his displeasure with the young outfielder’s defensive lapses.

What really killed Brower’s chances to make it in the Bronx, however was the team’s acquisition of Jesse Barfield during the first month of the ’89 regular season. With veteran Mel Hall already ensconced as the team’s fourth outfielder, the roster became two crowded to keep Brower and he was sent to Columbus.

He spent most of the next three seasons in the minors, trying to make it back to the big leagues, but he never would. Instead, he accepted a job with a young baseball agent named Scott Boras. The two had met when Brower was a student athlete at Duke. Boras became Brower’s agent. He is now vice president of Boras Corporation.

Brower shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this long-ago Yankee starting second baseman.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1989 NYY 26 75 69 9 16 3 0 2 3 3 6 11 .232 .293 .362 .656
4 Yrs 256 667 582 104 141 21 3 17 60 29 69 118 .242 .322 .376 .698
TEX (3 yrs) 230 592 513 95 125 18 3 15 57 26 63 107 .244 .326 .378 .704
NYY (1 yr) 26 75 69 9 16 3 0 2 3 3 6 11 .232 .293 .362 .656
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/10/2014.

January 7 – Happy Birthday Alfonso Soriano

sorianotpUp until the 2009 World Series, one of my most frequent Yankee related “What if…” questions was “What if the Yankees never traded Alfonso Soriano for A-Rod.” Then A-Rod finally put together an outstanding postseason that year and led my favorite team to its 27th World Championship. At the same time, Soriano had just struggled through his third straight regular season as a Cub and had been horrible in the two postseasons he played in for Chicago.  So I stopped playing the “What if…” game.

Since that 2009 World Series however, A-Rod has emphatically confirmed all of his maddening insecurities that negatively impact his play and make it so hard to root for him. Soriano, on the other hand, has taken advantage of an unexpected return trip to the Bronx to remind us all of just how amazing a ballplayer he can be when he goes on one of his patented “hot streaks.” So I again find myself asking the question, “what if that trade in February of 2004 had never been made?”

If the deal never went down, worst case scenario would be that the Yanks would have failed to win that 2009 title. Rodriguez also put some monster years together during his time in pinstripes especially in ’05 and ’07 so you have to wonder if without him, New York might have missed postseason play all-together in a couple of those seasons. But Soriano’s body of work during that same period of time was not too shabby either and don’t forget the Yanks would have probably used the many extra millions they paid A-Rod to sign at least one other impact free agent. The biggest benefit of getting rid of Soriano was that it opened up the opportunity for Robbie Cano to become New York’s starting second baseman. If you remember, when Soriano was traded to the Nationals from Texas, he fought Washington’s desire to move him from second base to the outfield. Knowing how the Yanks operate, the chances are pretty good they would have dealt a young Cano to another organization because they would have kept Soriano at second.

Oh well, we will never really know the true consequences but it’s fun to surmise. Meanwhile, Soriano turns 38-years-old today and is once again being counted on to help New York win a World Series. The Yankee brain-trust had to force GM Brian Cashman to make the deal with the Cubs that brought this native Dominican back to New York in late July of the 2013 season and thank God they did. At the time the Yankee offense was sinking like the Titanic in the AL East pennant race. Soriano desperately wanted to wear the pinstripes again and willingly waived the no-trade clause in his Cubs contract to make it happen. Then he went out and put the Yankee lineup on his back and just about single-handedly kept the team in contention for fall ball up until the final few weeks of the regular season.

With the free agent signings of Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran, Soriano’s role in the Yankees’ 2014 plans remains unclear. They have a glut of outfielders and DH’s on their current roster. But I’m hoping he gets a chance to start somewhere in the Yankee lineup because I don’t want to ask myself any more “What if the Yankees had kept Alfonso Soriano” questions.

This MVP of the 1952 World Series and this catcher from the 1927 Yankees were also born on January 7.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1998 Did not play in major leagues (Did Not Play)
1999 NYY 9 8 8 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 .125 .125 .500 .625
2000 NYY 22 53 50 5 9 3 0 2 3 2 1 15 .180 .196 .360 .556
2001 NYY 158 614 574 77 154 34 3 18 73 43 29 125 .268 .304 .432 .736
2002 NYY 156 741 696 128 209 51 2 39 102 41 23 157 .300 .332 .547 .880
2003 NYY 156 734 682 114 198 36 5 38 91 35 38 130 .290 .338 .525 .863
2013 NYY 58 243 219 37 56 8 0 17 50 8 21 67 .256 .325 .525 .850
15 Yrs 1908 8157 7524 1130 2045 466 31 406 1136 288 490 1732 .272 .321 .504 .825
CHC (7 yrs) 889 3696 3403 469 898 218 13 181 526 70 245 829 .264 .317 .495 .812
NYY (6 yrs) 559 2393 2229 363 627 132 10 115 320 129 112 497 .281 .323 .504 .827
TEX (2 yrs) 301 1340 1245 179 341 75 6 64 195 48 66 246 .274 .316 .498 .814
WSN (1 yr) 159 728 647 119 179 41 2 46 95 41 67 160 .277 .351 .560 .911
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/8/2014.

December 24 – Happy Birthday Bill Otis

You would think that with a last name like Otis, this guy would at least have had an “up and down” career with the Yankees parent club and their farm system. Unfortunately for Bill, his entire big league experience consisted of just four games for the 1912 New York Highlanders (the team’s name before they became the Yankees.) He got just one hit in seventeen at bats that year but that one hit came off the immortal Hall-of-Famer, Walter Johnson. He is the only current or former Yankee to be born on Christmas Eve. He’s also the only native of Scituate, MA to play Major League baseball. When he died in 1990 at the age of 100, he was the oldest living former MLB player on the planet.

The only other member of the Yankee family to be born on Christmas Eve is this former NL All Star pitcher who was signed by New York in 2011 but only pitched for their Triple A team in Scranton.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1912 NYY 4 20 17 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 3 3 .059 .200 .059 .259
1 Yr 4 20 17 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 3 3 .059 .200 .059 .259
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/24/2013.

December 14 – Happy Birthday John Anderson

His nickname was Honest John and he was the first native Norwegian to play in the Major Leagues. He was also the first New York Yankee (Highlander) starting position player to bat from both sides of the plate. Anderson was already familiar with the Big Apple when the St Louis Browns traded the then 30-year-old to New York after the 1903 season because he had been a starting outfielder for Brooklyn for most of the previous decade. With New York, he joined Wee Willie Keeler and Patsy Dougherty to form a strong  Highlander outfield that helped lead that team to a 92-victory season, falling just one and a half games short (to Boston) of the franchise’s first AL pennant. Anderson hit .278 and led the team with 82 RBIs. When he had a slow start at the plate the following year, New York waived him and he was picked up by the Senators, with whom he rebounded nicely by hitting .290 the rest of that season. During his second season playing in our Nation’s Capitol, he led the AL with 39 stolen bases in 1906. Honest John retired after the 1908 season with 1,843 hits and a .290 lifetime batting average during his fourteen seasons of big league ball.

The only other Major League position player to have been born in Norway was also a Yankee, serving as Bill Dickey’s backup at catcher for most of the 1930′s. Do you know his name? I’ll give the answer in tomorrow’s post.

Today is also the birthday of this former Yankee relief pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1904 NYY 143 598 558 62 155 27 12 3 82 20 23 37 .278 .313 .385 .699
1905 NYY 32 108 99 12 23 3 1 0 14 9 8 8 .232 .296 .283 .579
14 Yrs 1636 6848 6345 871 1843 328 124 50 978 338 310 356 .290 .329 .405 .734
BRO (6 yrs) 487 2131 1937 331 576 86 57 20 350 124 83 100 .297 .333 .432 .764
WSH (3 yrs) 339 1406 1316 145 370 58 14 4 152 80 75 90 .281 .323 .356 .679
SLB (3 yrs) 402 1735 1650 215 495 109 21 14 262 66 68 69 .300 .330 .417 .747
NYY (2 yrs) 175 706 657 74 178 30 13 3 96 29 31 45 .271 .311 .370 .681
WHS (1 yr) 110 471 430 70 131 28 18 9 71 18 23 19 .305 .357 .516 .873
CHW (1 yr) 123 399 355 36 93 17 1 0 47 21 30 33 .262 .321 .315 .637
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/15/2013.

December 10 – Happy Birthday Luis Polonia

One of the smallest players in baseball during the time he played, this 5’8″ outfielder used one of the biggest gloves in baseball history. Polonia, a native of the Dominican Republic, had three tours of duty in pinstripes. In June of 1989 he was traded to New York by the A’s in the deal that sent Rickey Henderson back to Oakland. He hit .313 during the second half of that season but an alleged sexual escapade with a minor after a game in Milwaukee in August of that year, nearly destroyed his career. The Yankees sent him to the Angels the following April. He then had his best big league seasons with California, averaging over 50 stolen bases per season during the next three years. In 1994, he rejoined New York and batted .311 in 94 games of action as the Yankees’ starting left-fielder. Then in 2000, Louis played his final 37 big league games in a Yankee uniform. In all, Luis played 12 seasons in the Majors, batting .293 lifetime.

Polonia shares his December with this one-time Yankee back-up receiver and this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1989 NYY 66 248 227 39 71 11 2 2 29 9 16 29 .313 .359 .405 .764
1990 NYY 11 23 22 2 7 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 .318 .304 .318 .623
1994 NYY 95 394 350 62 109 21 6 1 36 20 37 36 .311 .383 .414 .797
1995 NYY 67 269 238 37 62 9 3 2 15 10 25 29 .261 .326 .349 .675
2000 NYY 37 85 77 11 22 4 0 1 5 4 7 7 .286 .341 .377 .718
12 Yrs 1379 5296 4840 728 1417 189 70 36 405 321 369 543 .293 .342 .383 .726
NYY (5 yrs) 276 1019 914 151 271 45 11 6 88 44 85 102 .296 .357 .389 .746
CAL (4 yrs) 560 2347 2138 300 628 69 27 5 149 174 170 233 .294 .345 .358 .704
OAK (3 yrs) 268 1000 929 160 268 33 18 7 93 66 62 119 .288 .332 .385 .717
ATL (2 yrs) 50 90 84 9 27 7 0 0 4 4 4 12 .321 .348 .405 .753
DET (2 yrs) 167 653 600 83 181 31 13 16 57 25 38 57 .302 .343 .477 .819
BAL (1 yr) 58 187 175 25 42 4 1 2 14 8 10 20 .240 .285 .309 .594
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/10/2013.

December 8 – Happy Birthday Vernon Wells

vwellsI was one of those Yankee fans who was vociferously against the 2013 preseason deal that made Vernon Wells a Yankee. I understand how and why it happened. When both Granderson and Texeira went down with injuries this spring and it became apparent that Jeter was not ready to play, New York’s front office went into sort of a cheapskate panic mode. They needed to do something fast but they wanted it to also be easy and not too expensive. That explains the Vernon Wells deal in a nutshell. All one had to do to understand this was listen to the incessant bragging the team’s publicity department did about how the Angels had agreed to pick up most of the outfielder’s salary for the next two years.

Still, as a loyal, long-time Yankee fan, once the deal went down, I became a Vernon Wells fan and rooted for him like crazy. My sincere hope was that I would be proven completely wrong about his inability to help this Yankee team make the playoffs. And for about six weeks at the beginning of the season, it looked as if I might have been. Wells got out of the gate quickly and helped the Yankees do the same. By the end of April, he was hitting .300 and was on a pace to hit 30 home runs and drive in 90. Then two weeks later, Wells pretty much stopped hitting. He hit his 10th home run of the season on May 15. He then went three months before he hit another. By the end of June, his batting average had fallen to .223 and it was apparent to me that the move to obtain Wells would definitely not go down in franchise history as one of Brian Cashman’s better ones.

Now that the Yankees have signed Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran, one has to wonder if Wells will even be on the Yankee roster when Opening Day 2014 rolls around. He can still play good outfield defense but with Gardner, Soriano and Suzuki all still in Pinstripes, the Yankees have a glut of extra outfielders.

Wells was born in Shreveport, Louisiana on December 8, 1978. As anyone who has ever been his teammate will tell you, this guy is a class act in the clubhouse and during his prime, was one of the top outfielders in the American League. Even though he did not perform well during the 2013 season, he hustled every second he was on the field and handled the critical New York media like the consummate professional he is. That’s why I for one will continue to root for Vernon Wells.

Wells shares his birthday with this former Yankee shortstop,  this former Yankee starting pitcher and this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2013 NYY 130 458 424 45 99 16 0 11 50 7 30 73 .233 .282 .349 .631
15 Yrs 1731 7212 6642 930 1794 379 34 270 958 109 472 956 .270 .319 .459 .778
TOR (12 yrs) 1393 5963 5470 789 1529 339 30 223 813 90 406 762 .280 .329 .475 .804
LAA (2 yrs) 208 791 748 96 166 24 4 36 95 12 36 121 .222 .258 .409 .667
NYY (1 yr) 130 458 424 45 99 16 0 11 50 7 30 73 .233 .282 .349 .631
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/8/2013.

November 30 – Happy Birthday Matt Lawton

LawtonMarcus was the first of the two Lawton brothers to make it to the big leagues but it was younger brother Matt who became an All Star. Marcus Lawton made his ten-game Major League debut as a Yankee during the 1989 season and then never played another game in the big leagues. What he did too was spend lots of time with his younger sibling teaching him everything he knew about the game. The lessons paid off.

Matt Lawton enjoyed a solid twelve season career, with his best years coming  with the Twins and the Indians. He was an AL All Star with Minnesota in 2000 and again with Cleveland in 2004. The Yankees got him in a late August trade with the Cubs in 2005, just a few days after Hurricane Katrina demolished Lawton’s hometown of Gulfport,Mississippi and did severe damage to the outfielder’s home. He got off to a horribly slow start with New York but on September 21 of that season, he hit a huge 2-run home run that beat the Orioles and propelled the Yankees into first place.

During Lawton’s short time as a Yankee he tested positive for steroids and immediately admitted he took the drug and apologized. The Yanks released him in late October  He then signed with Seattle and after serving a ten-game suspension at the beginning of the 2006 season, he lasted just two months with  the Mariners, before hanging up his glove for good.

Lawton shares his birthday with this former Yankee starting pitcher and this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2005 NYY 21 57 48 6 6 0 0 2 4 1 7 8 .125 .263 .250 .513
12 Yrs 1334 5570 4763 756 1273 267 17 138 631 165 681 613 .267 .368 .417 .785
MIN (7 yrs) 771 3150 2672 423 739 163 13 72 384 96 408 335 .277 .379 .428 .808
CLE (3 yrs) 363 1593 1381 237 355 63 2 50 180 41 180 165 .257 .352 .414 .767
NYM (1 yr) 48 213 183 24 45 11 1 3 13 10 22 34 .246 .352 .366 .718
PIT (1 yr) 101 445 374 53 102 28 1 10 44 16 58 61 .273 .380 .433 .813
CHC (1 yr) 19 83 78 8 19 2 0 1 5 1 4 8 .244 .289 .308 .597
SEA (1 yr) 11 29 27 5 7 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 .259 .310 .259 .570
NYY (1 yr) 21 57 48 6 6 0 0 2 4 1 7 8 .125 .263 .250 .513
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/30/2013.

November 25 – Happy Birthday Mark Whiten

MWhiten“Hard Hittin” Mark Whiten had his career year in 1993. On the final day of spring training that season, this then, 25-year-old, switch-hitting native of Pensacola, FL was traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Cardinals. He joined a starting outfield in St.Louis that included Bernard Gilkey and Ray Lankford and he led that team with 25 home runs and 99 RBIs. On September 7, 1993 he made baseball history by smashing 4 home runs and driving in 12 runs in a single game.

The Players Strike disrupted Whiten’s second season with the Cards and there would be no third. He was traded to Boston at the start of the ’95 season, which began an odyssey that would put the outfielder in six different big league uniforms over the next four years. The fifth of those uniforms was pinstriped. The Yankees signed Whiten as a free agent in January of 1997. In New York, he was reunited with Joe Torre, the same guy who managed him during his career year with the Cardinals.

Torre began the season by platooning Whiten and Darryl Strawberry in left field. Big Mark got off to a great start at the plate and was still hitting over .300 the first week of June. But when Strawberry went down with a bad knee, it would be Tim Raines who took over as the team’s starter in left. Whiten was left to battle Chad Curtis for the fourth outfielder’s slot and when Curtis won that battle, the Yanks released Whiten that August. He then signed on with Cleveland and appeared in his last big league game as an Indian in 2000.

Whiten shares his November 25th birthday with this former Yankee infielder, this recent Yankee outfielder and  this Hall-of-Fame Yankee center fielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1997 NYY 69 248 215 34 57 11 0 5 24 4 30 47 .265 .360 .386 .746
11 Yrs 940 3523 3104 465 804 129 20 105 423 78 378 712 .259 .341 .415 .756
CLE (5 yrs) 320 1167 1024 142 265 49 8 23 103 22 126 218 .259 .343 .390 .732
PHI (2 yrs) 120 461 394 71 100 18 1 18 58 20 64 125 .254 .361 .442 .802
STL (2 yrs) 244 1000 896 138 240 31 6 39 152 25 95 185 .268 .338 .446 .784
TOR (2 yrs) 79 260 237 24 57 5 4 4 26 2 18 49 .241 .292 .346 .638
ATL (1 yr) 36 107 90 12 23 5 1 3 17 2 16 25 .256 .364 .433 .798
BOS (1 yr) 32 117 108 13 20 3 0 1 10 1 8 23 .185 .239 .241 .480
NYY (1 yr) 69 248 215 34 57 11 0 5 24 4 30 47 .265 .360 .386 .746
SEA (1 yr) 40 163 140 31 42 7 0 12 33 2 21 40 .300 .399 .607 1.006
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/24/2013.

November 10 – Happy Birthday Chick Fewster

fewsterIt would not take too long for just about any Yankee fan to corresctly guess who hit the first World Series home run in franchise history. That would be the one and only Babe Ruth. The Bambino hit the historic blast in Game 4 of the 1921 World Series versus the Yankees’ Polo Grounds landlord at the time, the mighty New York Giants. But even the most astute fan of Bronx Bomber baseball could keep guessing for the next ten years and not come up with the name of the second Yankee to perform that same feat.

The correct answer of course, is today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant, Wilson Lloyd “Chick” Fewster. His two-run blast in the top of the second inning of that same Fall Classic’s very next game, gave the Yankees a temporary 5-3 lead they would eventually lose. Its no wonder the name “Chick Fewster” means nothing to Yankee fans. After all, his entire Yankee career consisted of just 228 games spread over six lackluster seasons beginning in 1917. Back then, Yankee manager Miller Huggins was predicting great things for his young outfielder, telling the New York sports press that he had never seen a better prospect than this new kid from Baltimore. But Fewster would never fulfill that promise and he almost didn’t live long enough to hit that World Series home run either.

In a 1920 spring training game against the Brooklyn Robins, Fewster was hit in the head by a pitch and nearly died. They put a plate in his head and doctors told him he’d never play baseball again. Miraculously, he was back in action by early July of that same season.

He shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this one-time Yankee DH.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1917 NYY 11 41 36 2 8 0 0 0 1 1 5 5 .222 .317 .222 .539
1918 NYY 5 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 .500 .500 1.000
1919 NYY 81 295 244 38 69 9 3 1 15 8 34 36 .283 .386 .357 .743
1920 NYY 21 36 21 8 6 1 0 0 1 0 7 2 .286 .464 .333 .798
1921 NYY 66 247 207 44 58 19 0 1 19 4 28 43 .280 .382 .386 .768
1922 NYY 44 162 132 20 32 4 1 1 9 2 16 23 .242 .324 .311 .635
11 Yrs 644 2308 1963 282 506 91 12 6 167 57 240 264 .258 .346 .326 .672
NYY (6 yrs) 228 783 642 113 174 33 4 3 45 15 90 109 .271 .372 .349 .721
BOS (2 yrs) 113 424 367 40 91 14 2 0 24 15 45 45 .248 .337 .297 .634
BRO (2 yrs) 109 397 338 54 82 16 3 2 24 9 45 49 .243 .340 .325 .666
CLE (2 yrs) 194 704 616 75 159 28 3 1 74 18 60 61 .258 .327 .318 .645
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/9/2013.

November 9 – Happy Birthday Harvey Hendrick

hendricksAfter Miller Huggins’ Yankee team lost their second straight World Series to the New York Giants in 1922, the diminutive field skipper spent his offseason trying to figure out what his ball club needed in the way of personnel to finally beat his crosstown rivals in a Fall Classic. He brought his shopping list with him to the Yanks 1923 spring training camp in New Orleans and it included an infielder, two pitchers, a third string catcher and two new outfielders. One of those outfielders ended up being today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant.

Harvey “Gink” Hendrick was born in Mason, TN in 1897 and had played college ball at Vanderbilt University, his native state’s most famous school. He then spent a couple of years in the minors including a solid 1922 season with Galveston in the Texas League during which he belted 16 home runs and averaged .311. The Red Sox signed him to a contract but in early January of 1923, he was traded to New York along with pitcher George Pipgras. Hendrick then performed well enough that spring to earn a spot on Huggins’ Opening Day roster.

He ended up serving as a fifth outfielder and occasional pinch-hitter on that 1923 Yankee squad, which featured a strong starting outfield of Babe Ruth,Bob Meusel and Whitey Witt along with the veteran Elmer Smith as their primary backup. Like fellow rookie and teammate, Lou Gehrig, Hendrick spent most of that season sitting on the Yankee bench. Fortunately for him, however, New York dominated the AL Pennant race that year, beating second place Detroit by a full 16 games. That permitted Huggins to rest his starters the whole final month of his season. That meant lots of playing time for Hendrick and he made the most of it, raising his average by 40 points and hitting all three of his rookie season home runs that September. His strong finish helped convince Huggins to keep the rookie outfielder on the Yanks’ postseason roster. Hendrick made his one and only career World Series appearance in the eighth inning of that Series’ first game as a pinch hitter for Yankee shortstop Everett Scott, flying out to center off of Giants’ reliever Rosey Ryan. He did end up winning a coveted ring.

He spent one more season in New York in 1924, playing about as much and performing about as well as he did the year before. The Yanks released him after that second season and he ended up with the Indians in 1925 and back in the minors in ’26. He got his break in 1927 when he became an often-used utility player for a pretty bad Brooklyn Robins team. For the next three seasons he averaged 120 games played and over 400 at bats playing some outfield, some third base and some first base for Brooklyn. He averaged over .300 in each of those seasons including a career high .354 in 1929.

The Robins traded Hendrick to Cincinnati at the start of the 1931 regular season and he would later also play for the Cardinals and Phillies before his big league career ended in 1936. Evidently, Hendrick struggled in life after his playing days were over because in 1941 he committed suicide by shooting himself in his Covington, Tennessee home. Other former Yankees who have taken their own lives include; Dan McGann, Jake Powell, Hugh Casey and most recently, Hideki Irabu.

Hendrick shares a birthday with this one-time Yankee second baseman and this former Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1923 NYY 37 69 66 9 18 3 1 3 12 3 2 8 .273 .294 .485 .779
1924 NYY 40 80 76 7 20 0 0 1 11 1 2 7 .263 .291 .303 .594
11 Yrs 922 3219 2910 434 896 157 46 48 413 75 239 243 .308 .364 .443 .807
BRO (5 yrs) 433 1604 1435 236 456 68 28 34 219 61 129 113 .318 .378 .475 .853
CIN (2 yrs) 231 1021 928 130 287 62 12 5 115 6 76 69 .309 .363 .418 .782
NYY (2 yrs) 77 149 142 16 38 3 1 4 23 4 4 15 .268 .293 .387 .680
PHI (1 yr) 59 127 116 12 34 8 0 0 19 0 9 15 .293 .344 .362 .706
STL (1 yr) 28 77 72 8 18 2 0 1 5 0 5 9 .250 .299 .319 .618
CHC (1 yr) 69 208 189 30 55 13 3 4 23 4 13 17 .291 .346 .455 .801
CLE (1 yr) 25 33 28 2 8 1 2 0 9 0 3 5 .286 .355 .464 .819
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/9/2013.