Results tagged ‘ outfielder ’

June 17 – Happy Birthday Vic Mata

Vic Mata got his opportunity to play in the Bronx in 1984 mostly because George Steinbrenner was growing frustrated playing and paying high-priced veterans to miss the playoffs. In 1983, the Yankees had won 91 games but finished third in the AL East. That was the second consecutive season New York had failed to qualify for Fall Ball and that was the first time that had happened to a Yankee team since 1975. So “The Boss” let it be known he wanted to start testing the fruit from the Yankee farm system, hoping young guys like Don Mattingly, Mike Pagliarullo, Bobby Meacham and Vic Mata could show the old guys how to win with hunger and hustle. The Yankees were a game under .500 in July when Mata got his first start. Yogi Berra played the Dominican Republic native quite a bit in center field for the balance of that year and both Vic and the Yankees responded. Mata got real hot at the plate in August and helped the Yankees go 40-27 the rest of the way. But that proved to be the best and longest stretch of big league baseball Mata would ever play. That December, the short-memoried Steinbrenner went out and got the A’s Ricky Henderson to play center field for the Yankees. Then when the Yankees got off to a slow start in ’85 “The Boss” canned Berra and replaced him with good old Billy Martin. Berra liked Mata and Martin loved Henderson. Mata ended up playing just six more regular-season games in pinstripes.

After spending the final couple of seasons of his playing career in the minors, Mata eventually got into scouting. It has been in that capacity that this he has made his most significant contribution to the Yankees. Vic is the guy who signed Robinson Cano. He is also the only Yankee past or present who was born on June 17th. Happy Fathers’ Day to all you Dads out there.

Mata shares his birthday with this former front office Yankee executive.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1984 NYY 30 76 70 8 23 5 0 1 6 1 0 12 .329 .333 .443 .776
1985 NYY 6 7 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 .143 .143 .286
2 Yrs 36 83 77 9 24 5 0 1 6 1 0 12 .312 .316 .416 .732
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/17/2013.

June 16 – Happy Birthday Allie Clarke

This Jersey native started his seven-season big league career appearing in 24 games with the 1947 Yankees. Most of those appearances were as a first baseman. He was one of the last Yankees to wear uniform number 3 before it was retired upon Babe Ruth’s death in 1948. The highlight of Clarke’s short stay in pinstripes had to be his participation in the 1947 World Series. He appeared in three games against the Dodgers in that Fall Classic, came to the plate three times, getting a walk a base hit, scoring a run and delivering an RBI. He was then traded to the Indians for pitcher Red Embree and appeared in his second straight Series that year, when the Indians captured the AL Pennant. He played three plus seasons in Cleveland and then joined the A’s in Philadelphia for a while. He played his last big league game in 1953.

Clarke played briefly for the Amsterdam Rugmakers in 1941. The team was based in my hometown of Amsterdam, NY and was the Yankees’ C-level affiliate in the old Canadian-American League. He wowed our town’s local sports press by averaging .368 during his 20 games with the team.

He shares his June 16th birthday with this former Yankee reliever and this one too.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1947 NYY 24 73 67 9 25 5 0 1 14 0 5 2 .373 .417 .493 .909
7 Yrs 358 1106 1021 131 267 48 4 32 149 2 72 70 .262 .312 .410 .722
CLE (4 yrs) 178 562 518 73 135 17 3 17 71 0 39 32 .261 .312 .403 .716
PHA (3 yrs) 147 456 421 49 106 26 1 14 64 2 28 31 .252 .303 .418 .721
NYY (1 yr) 24 73 67 9 25 5 0 1 14 0 5 2 .373 .417 .493 .909
CHW (1 yr) 9 15 15 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 .067 .067 .067 .133
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/16/2013.

June 12 – Happy Birthday Hideki Matsui

The initial signing of this former Yomiuri Giant standout was a great move by the Yankee front office prior to the 2003 season. Only Ishiru Suzuki ranks in front of him in terms of on-the-field performance by a Japanese player in the Major Leagues. He knocked in over 100 runs in four of his first five seasons in Pinstripes and only a wrist injury prevented him from making it all five.

The second contract the Yankees gave Matsui (four years, $52 million) after the 2005 season, did not turn out as well for New York. The wrist mishap ended Hideki’s consecutive game streak of over 1,700 (started in Japan and continued during his first 518 games as a Yankee.) After the broken wrist, he missed close to forty percent of the Yankee’s regular-season games during the next three seasons with an assortment of ailments and injuries including two very painful knees.

Matsui then put together a memorable final year in pinstripes in 2009. During the regular season he blasted 28 home runs and drove in ninety. But he saved his very best effort for the 2009 World Series. He hit .615 in fourteen plate appearances against the Phillies with three home runs and 8 RBIs. I had the pleasure of seeing him hit one of those round-trippers live, at Game 2 at the Stadium. His Game 6 performance will remain one for the ages. Matsui drove in six of the seven Yankee runs with a homer, double and single and was named the Series MVP. Since he hit 332 home runs while playing in Japan, Matsui ended up with 507 combined home runs during his career.

Matsui’s quiet brilliance during his seven seasons in the Bronx made him one of my favorite Yankees. “Godzilla” announced his retirement from baseball on December 27, 2012.

This former Yankee relief pitcher shares Matsui’s birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2003 NYY 163 695 623 82 179 42 1 16 106 2 63 86 .287 .353 .435 .788
2004 NYY 162 680 584 109 174 34 2 31 108 3 88 103 .298 .390 .522 .912
2005 NYY 162 704 629 108 192 45 3 23 116 2 63 78 .305 .367 .496 .863
2006 NYY 51 201 172 32 52 9 0 8 29 1 27 23 .302 .393 .494 .887
2007 NYY 143 634 547 100 156 28 4 25 103 4 73 73 .285 .367 .488 .855
2008 NYY 93 378 337 43 99 17 0 9 45 0 38 47 .294 .370 .424 .795
2009 NYY 142 528 456 62 125 21 1 28 90 0 64 75 .274 .367 .509 .876
10 Yrs 1236 5066 4442 656 1253 249 12 175 760 13 547 689 .282 .360 .462 .822
NYY (7 yrs) 916 3820 3348 536 977 196 11 140 597 12 416 485 .292 .370 .482 .852
TBR (1 yr) 34 103 95 7 14 1 0 2 7 0 8 22 .147 .214 .221 .435
OAK (1 yr) 141 585 517 58 130 28 0 12 72 1 56 84 .251 .321 .375 .696
LAA (1 yr) 145 558 482 55 132 24 1 21 84 0 67 98 .274 .361 .459 .820
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/12/2013.