Results tagged ‘ october 21 ’

October 21 – Happy Birthday John Flaherty

Flash.FlahertyFlash turns 46 years old today. Before he joined the YES Network as an analyst for Yankee games and as a commentator on the Post Game shows, Flaherty was a big league catcher for fourteen seasons with five different teams. Born in the Big Apple, he ended that playing career in his hometown, with three seasons as Jorge Posada’s backup from 2003 until 2005. During lulls in the action, when he is in the booth for Yankee games, viewers often hear Michael Kay or Kenny Singleton tease Flaherty about the lucrative contract he signed with Tampa Bay, back in 1998. He pocketed about $12 million of Devil Ray money during his five season stay for catching about 90 games per year and averaging .252. He hit just .226 during his 134-game career in pinstripes but he’s doing a much better job for New York in his broadcasting role.

In 2011, Flaherty became an owner of a professional baseball team, when he founded the Rockland Boulders, a member of the unaffiliated Canadian-American League. The team is based in Rockland County, NY.

Like Flaherty, this Yankee was born in New York City and celebrates his birthday on this date. He did a bit better than John did while playing in New York and now has a plaque in Cooperstown. Also born on October 21st is this former Yankee pitcher who flirted with World Series history in 1947.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2003 NYY 40 116 105 16 28 8 0 4 14 0 4 19 .267 .297 .457 .754
2004 NYY 47 135 127 11 32 9 0 6 16 0 5 25 .252 .286 .465 .750
2005 NYY 47 138 127 10 21 5 0 2 11 0 6 26 .165 .206 .252 .458
14 Yrs 1047 3640 3372 319 849 176 3 80 395 10 175 514 .252 .290 .377 .667
TBD (5 yrs) 471 1802 1673 157 422 82 1 35 196 3 86 250 .252 .289 .365 .654
NYY (3 yrs) 134 389 359 37 81 22 0 12 41 0 15 70 .226 .261 .387 .648
DET (3 yrs) 193 594 546 59 130 35 1 15 67 1 27 83 .238 .277 .388 .665
BOS (2 yrs) 48 100 91 6 16 4 0 0 4 0 5 13 .176 .224 .220 .444
SDP (2 yrs) 201 755 703 60 200 33 1 18 87 6 42 98 .284 .324 .411 .736
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/21/2013.

October 21 – Happy Birthday Whitey Ford

The argument is easy to make that Whitey Ford is the greatest Yankee starting pitcher of all time. “The Chairman of the Board” was a winner from the get-go, helping New York capture the 1950 pennant in his rookie season by winning nine of ten regular season decisions. He then pitched eight and two thirds innings of shutout ball to earn his first of ten World Series victories in that year’s Fall Classic against the Philadelphia Whiz Kids.

After a two-year hitch in the military, Ford rejoined the Yankees in 1953 and began a streak of thirteen consecutive winning seasons. I firmly believe that if anyone other than Casey Stengel managed the Yankees during the fifties, Ford would have had a lot more regular season victories. Stengel liked to manipulate his rotation so he could match up Ford against the opposing team’s best pitcher, which caused Whitey to average about six to eight less starts per season than the aces of other Major League teams during that decade. When Ralph Houk took over from Stengel in 1961, he gave Ford the ball every fourth game down the stretch and the southpaw responded well to the regularity and extra workload. He had his best year in 1961, when he captured the Cy Young Award with a stunning 25-4 record. In 1963, he went 24-7 and in 1964, eight of his seventeen victories were complete game shutouts.

A native New Yorker, Whitey, country bumpkin Mickey Mantle, and the fiery Californian, Billy Martin, formed a friendship triumvirate that created a lot of success for the Yankees on the field but lots of trouble off of it. Since Ford only played once every five games, he could party hard six nights a week and rest up the evening before his scheduled start. As position players, Mantle and Martin didn’t have that luxury and there were many an early afternoon game when Whitey would sit in the dugout laughing at the play of his two hung over drinking buddies while Stengel fumed.

Ford retired in 1967 after spending his entire seventeen-year career in a Yankee uniform. His 236 regular season victories are still number 1 on New York’s all-time list. His incredible .690 career winning percentage is also still the best of any pitcher with 300 or more career decisions.

Back in 2008, during the ESPN television broadcast of the final game at Yankee Stadium, Ford and his longtime battery mate and fellow Hall-of-Famer Yogi Berra, were invited up to the broadcast booth to share their memories of playing in the Stadium. Those thirty minutes listening to two of my heroes talk about their Yankee playing days was the personal highlight of that 2008 baseball season. Whitey turns 84-years-old today. How did all those years come and go so fast?

Whitey shares his October 21st birthday with former Yankee pitcher, Bill Bevens and former Yankee catcher, John Flaherty.

Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1950 21 NYY AL 9 1 .900 2.81 20 12 5 7 2 1 112.0 87 39 35 7 52 59 1.241
1953 24 NYY AL 18 6 .750 3.00 32 30 2 11 3 0 207.0 187 77 69 13 110 110 1.435
1954 25 NYY AL 16 8 .667 2.82 34 28 4 11 3 1 210.2 170 72 66 10 101 125 1.286
1955 26 NYY AL 18 7 .720 2.63 39 33 4 18 5 2 253.2 188 83 74 20 113 137 1.187
1956 27 NYY AL 19 6 .760 2.47 31 30 1 18 2 1 225.2 187 70 62 13 84 141 1.201
1957 28 NYY AL 11 5 .688 2.57 24 17 2 5 0 0 129.1 114 46 37 10 53 84 1.291
1958 29 NYY AL 14 7 .667 2.01 30 29 1 15 7 1 219.1 174 62 49 14 62 145 1.076
1959 30 NYY AL 16 10 .615 3.04 35 29 4 9 2 1 204.0 194 82 69 13 89 114 1.387
1960 31 NYY AL 12 9 .571 3.08 33 29 1 8 4 0 192.2 168 76 66 15 65 85 1.209
1961 32 NYY AL 25 4 .862 3.21 39 39 0 11 3 0 283.0 242 108 101 23 92 209 1.180
1962 33 NYY AL 17 8 .680 2.90 38 37 0 7 0 0 257.2 243 90 83 22 69 160 1.211
1963 34 NYY AL 24 7 .774 2.74 38 37 1 13 3 1 269.1 240 94 82 26 56 189 1.099
1964 35 NYY AL 17 6 .739 2.13 39 36 2 12 8 1 244.2 212 67 58 10 57 172 1.099
1965 36 NYY AL 16 13 .552 3.24 37 36 1 9 2 1 244.1 241 97 88 22 50 162 1.191
1966 37 NYY AL 2 5 .286 2.47 22 9 7 0 0 0 73.0 79 33 20 8 24 43 1.411
1967 38 NYY AL 2 4 .333 1.64 7 7 0 2 1 0 44.0 40 11 8 2 9 21 1.114
16 Yrs 236 106 .690 2.75 498 438 35 156 45 10 3170.1 2766 1107 967 228 1086 1956 1.215
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/21/2013.

October 21 – Happy Birthday Bill Bevens

It took big Bill Bevens eight seasons to pitch his way up the ladder of the Yankee Minor League organization in the late thirties and early forties. He may never have taken the final step if it weren’t for the parent club’s pitching shortage caused by WWII. The six foot three inch right-hander went 4-1 for the 1944 Yankee team and in the process proved he had good enough stuff to earn a shot at making the post war Yankee rotation. He then proceeded to put together 13-9 and 16-13 records for New York the following two seasons and his 2.26 ERA in 1946 was the fourth best figure in the American League. But he also threw 249 innings during that ’46 season, far more than he had ever been asked to pitch since he first broke into the minors.

The wear and tear on Beven’s right arm began to show during the 1947 regular season. His walks per inning and ERA both climbed and he won just 7 games while losing 13. Still, Yankee Manager Bucky Harris had enough faith in the Hubbard, Oregon native to start him in the fourth game of ’47 World Series versus Brooklyn. The contest took place at Ebbets Field and for eight and two thirds innings, Bevens held the Dodgers hitless. It wasn’t what you would call a masterpiece performance. Up to that point he had already walked ten guys and given up a run because of his wildness but it was the World Series for God’s sake and as he faced Dodger pinch-hitter Cookie Lavagetto with runners on first and second, there was still a big “0” under the “H” alongside the “Home” team on the Ebbets Field scoreboard. Bevens was on the threshold of making history!

But instead, Lavagetto swung late but hard on a Bevens’ fastball and hit it down the right field line. The Yankees were playing Cookie to pull and by the time right fielder Tommy Henrich got to the ball, both Dodger base runners were well on their way to scoring the tying and game-winning runs. Fortunately for Bevens and the Yankees, New York would go on to win the Series in seven games and big Bill would pitch very well in relief in that seventh game.

Bevens then showed up at the Yankee’s 1948 spring training camp with a sore arm. The guy who was one batter away from throwing the first World Series no-hitter in big league history just four months previously, would never again throw a pitch in a big league game. After spending the first eight seasons of his professional baseball career pitching in the Minors trying to get to the Majors, Bevens spent the last six years of his career doing the exact same thing. He finally gave up trying in 1953. He died in 1991 at the age of 75.

Bevens shares his October 21st birthday with this Hall-of-Fame Yankee pitcher and this former Yankee back-up catcher who now gets paid to talk about my favorite team.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1944 NYY 4 1 .800 2.68 8 5 3 3 0 0 43.2 44 18 13 4 13 16 1.305
1945 NYY 13 9 .591 3.67 29 25 2 14 2 0 184.0 174 83 75 12 68 76 1.315
1946 NYY 16 13 .552 2.23 31 31 0 18 3 0 249.2 213 73 62 11 78 120 1.166
1947 NYY 7 13 .350 3.82 28 23 3 11 1 0 165.0 167 79 70 13 77 77 1.479
4 Yrs 40 36 .526 3.08 96 84 8 46 6 0 642.1 598 253 220 40 236 289 1.298
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/21/2013.