Results tagged ‘ november 28 ’

November 28 – Happy Birthday Roxey Roach

Roach2His real name was Wilbur Roach, but he eventually became known better by the nickname “Roxey.” A native Pennsylvanian, Roach seems to have also been a pretty astute businessman and before Ted Williams came along, perhaps the the best fly-fishing ball player ever born.

He started playing minor league ball in 1906, when he was already 23-years-old. He made his big league debut with the 1910 New York Highlanders, a surprisingly good team that would finish 25 games over five hundred that season. That was only good enough for second place, far behind the powerful A’s of Connie Mack.

George Stallings was the skipper of that Highlander ball club and he might have thought Roach had a decent shot at unseating New York’s starting shortstop at the time, the light-hitting John Knight. Roxey appeared in 70 games that year but hit just .214. Mean whiile, Knight had an offensive epiphany, finishing the 1910 season with a .312 batting average, which was about 100 points higher than his lifetime average had been up to that point.

Getting outplayed by Knight was not the only disruption that occurred in Roach’s career that year. George Stallings had suspected that New York’s starting first baseman, Hal Chase was involved with professional gamblers and was throwing games. When he became convinced his suspicions were true, he went to both the League President and the Highlanders’ ownership and demanded Chase be banned. Instead, the team’s owners, who happened to be big gamblers themselves, not only sided with Chase, they fired Stallings and made the first baseman the team’s new manager.

After appearing in just 13 games for New York in 1911, Roach’s contract was sold to a minor league team. Since he owned both a pool hall and a bowling alley back home in Pennsylvania, Roach didn’t need his baseball salary to survive but he kept playing minor league ball and in 1915 signed a contract to play for the International League’s Toronto Maple Leafs. At midseason, however, the Buffalo franchise of the upstart Federal League offered him $1,000 more than the Leafs were paying him and he jumped the team to take the raise.

Roxey's Gray Squirrel Tail

Roxey’s Gray Squirrel Tail

When the Federal League folded, Roach continued playing minor league ball, this time in Louisville. He also continued pursuing his favorite sports, which were fly fishing and hunting. Earlier in his career, he had purchased some land in Michigan to serve as his private fish and game preserve. He moved up there, opened a Ford dealership and pursued his passions. It seems that he was also one of the great fly tiers of all time. Known as “patterns” in the sport, Roxey’s Fox Squirrel Tail and Gray Squirrel Tail fly patterns have become famous worldwide among fly fisherman and are still replicated today.

Roxey was also proficient in another area as well. He fathered 14 children. He suffered a fatal heart attack the day after Christmas in 1947.

Roxey shares his birthday with this former Yankee closer and this one-time Yankee phee-nom.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1910 NYY 70 260 220 27 47 9 2 0 20 15 29 34 .214 .313 .273 .586
1911 NYY 13 48 40 4 10 2 1 0 2 0 6 5 .250 .348 .350 .698
4 Yrs 177 680 608 67 151 31 6 3 54 26 52 73 .248 .311 .334 .645
NYY (2 yrs) 83 308 260 31 57 11 3 0 22 15 35 39 .219 .319 .285 .603
WSH (1 yr) 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 .500 .500 2.000 2.500
BUF (1 yr) 92 370 346 35 93 20 3 2 31 11 17 34 .269 .303 .361 .664
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/28/2013.

November 28 – Happy Birthday Dave Righetti

When Dave Righetti went 8-4  and was named AL Rookie of the Year during the Yankees’ strike-shortened 1981 season, the Big Apple media was ready to anoint the tall Californian the best New York lefty starter since Whitey Ford. “Rags” was no Ford but he was very good. His brilliant no-hitter against the Boston Red Sox on July 4, 1983 was an unforgettable moment in Pinstripe history and is still being rebroadcast as part of the Yankee Classics series on the YES Network.

When Goose Gossage left in 1984, New York needed a closer and they turned to Righetti. His biggest apprehension about going to the bullpen was that he sometimes struggled with his control and had a tendency to give up walks in streaks, a nightmare situation for a closer. As it turned out, Righetti made the transition from starter to stopper smoothly. He set the AL record, since broken, for most saves in a season in 1986, with 46. When he left New York to sign a free agent contract with San Francisco after the 1990 season, he was the Yankees all-time saves leader with 224.

Unfortunately for Rags, 1981 would be the last postseason appearance for New York for the next fourteen years. After he retired in 1994, he got into coaching and eventually landed the pitching coach position with the San Francisco Giants. He’s now won two rings in that role and is getting much deserved praise for his ability to get the most out of the Giant rotation and bullpen, despite injuries to key members of his staff and significant performance slumps by others. Dave was born in San Jose, CA on November 28, 1958.

Rags shares his November 28th birthday with this one-time Yankee phew-nom and this long-ago fly-fishing Highlander shortstop.

Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1979 20 NYY AL 0 1 .000 3.63 3 3 0 0 0 0 17.1 10 7 7 2 10 13 1.154
1981 22 NYY AL 8 4 .667 2.05 15 15 0 2 0 0 105.1 75 25 24 1 38 89 1.073
1982 23 NYY AL 11 10 .524 3.79 33 27 3 4 0 1 183.0 155 88 77 11 108 163 1.437
1983 24 NYY AL 14 8 .636 3.44 31 31 0 7 2 0 217.0 194 96 83 12 67 169 1.203
1984 25 NYY AL 5 6 .455 2.34 64 0 53 0 0 31 96.1 79 29 25 5 37 90 1.204
1985 26 NYY AL 12 7 .632 2.78 74 0 60 0 0 29 107.0 96 36 33 5 45 92 1.318
1986 27 NYY AL 8 8 .500 2.45 74 0 68 0 0 46 106.2 88 31 29 4 35 83 1.153
1987 28 NYY AL 8 6 .571 3.51 60 0 54 0 0 31 95.0 95 45 37 9 44 77 1.463
1988 29 NYY AL 5 4 .556 3.52 60 0 41 0 0 25 87.0 86 35 34 5 37 70 1.414
1989 30 NYY AL 2 6 .250 3.00 55 0 53 0 0 25 69.0 73 32 23 3 26 51 1.435
1990 31 NYY AL 1 1 .500 3.57 53 0 47 0 0 36 53.0 48 24 21 8 26 43 1.396
16 Yrs 82 79 .509 3.46 718 89 474 13 2 252 1403.2 1287 602 540 95 591 1112 1.338
NYY (11 yrs) 74 61 .548 3.11 522 76 379 13 2 224 1136.2 999 448 393 65 473 940 1.295
SFG (3 yrs) 5 15 .250 4.61 166 4 87 0 0 28 197.1 201 107 101 19 81 129 1.429
OAK (1 yr) 0 0 16.71 7 0 1 0 0 0 7.0 13 13 13 3 9 4 3.143
CHW (1 yr) 3 2 .600 4.20 10 9 1 0 0 0 49.1 65 24 23 6 18 29 1.682
TOR (1 yr) 0 1 .000 6.75 13 0 6 0 0 0 13.1 9 10 10 2 10 10 1.425
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/28/2013.

November 28 – Happy Birthday Jesus Montero

Yankee Universe got really excited when this kid made his Yankee Stadium big league debut in September of 2011. In 18 end-of-the-season games, he hit .328 with 4 HRs and 12 RBIs and exhibited the opposite field power a right hand hitter needs to prosper in “the new house that Jeter helped build.” He then went 2-for-2 in his only postseason appearance in the Yankee’s Game 4 ALDS victory over Detroit. I joined thousands of other Yankee fans thinking we might really be witnessing the next home-grown pinstriped impact player. But that vision turned out to be a mirage.

If Jesus is going to turn out to be a team’s savior in the next few years, the team that will benefit will be the Mariners. That’s because Brian Cashman rolled the dice after the 2011 playoffs and sent Montero to Seattle with pitcher Hector Noesi in exchange for big Michael Pineda and Jose Campos.

Even though he had a disappointing 2012 season for Seattle (15 HRs, 62 RBIs, .260 ave. and .685 OPS) Montero produced much more for Seattle than Pineda did for NY since the pitcher ended up injured and on the DL the entire year. But Montero also confirmed the doubters who said he hadn’t yet developed the level of catching skills he would need to start at that position in the big leagues. Combine that with his less-than-acceptable .228 average against right-handed pitching last season and you’ll understand why Yankee fans are feeling a lot less bitter about the deal than they would have if Montero had been able to turn his Mariner debut into a breakout performance.

The 6’5″, 225 pound Montero turns just 23-years-old today and barring a blockbuster type deal. Former Yankee receiver Butch Wynegar, who managed Montero in the Minors is pretty confident that this Venezuelan will evolve into a competent Major League receiver. He’s already proved he has the stroke to average .300 against southpaws and I remain confident he will hit 30 home runs per year at the Major League level so I’m really hoping Pineda or Campos does at some point become a significant contributor to the Yankee pitching fortunes.

Today is also the birthday of this long-ago Highlander shortstop and the current pitching coach of the San Francisco Giants

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2011 NYY 18 69 61 9 20 4 0 4 12 0 7 17 .328 .406 .590 .996
3 Yrs 182 732 677 61 175 25 1 22 83 0 44 137 .258 .303 .396 .699
SEA (2 yrs) 164 663 616 52 155 21 1 18 71 0 37 120 .252 .293 .377 .669
NYY (1 yr) 18 69 61 9 20 4 0 4 12 0 7 17 .328 .406 .590 .996
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/28/2013.