Results tagged ‘ november 22 ’

November 22 – Happy Birthday Rich McKinney

mckinneyThough the transaction took place over four decades ago, I know I screamed in anguish when I heard about the trade. Three weeks before Christmas in 1971, the Yankees sent their 1968 Rookie-of-the-Year-winning right-hander, Stan Bahnsen to the Chicago White Sox. They took a guy who had won the impressive total of 55 games for some mediocre New York teams during the previous four seasons and sent him to the Windy City in exchange for a 25-year-old utility infielder named Rich McKinney.

I knew what Yankee skipper Ralph Houk and the team’s GM, Lee MacPhail were thinking when they pulled the trigger on that one. New York desperately needed a good starting third baseman. They hadn’t had one since they traded Clete Boyer to the Braves in 1966.

McKinney, a native of Piqua, OH, had been in the big leagues for just two seasons and was coming off a decent year in which he had averaged .271 in 114 games as Chicago’s primary utility infielder. There was nothing in his resume that indicated he was going to be anything special, but after trying to win with guys like Charley Smith and Jerry Kenney at the hot corner, Houk and MacPhail figured this kid was worth a shot. But he wasn’t worth Stan Bahnsen!

The veteran right-hander took his “Bahnsen Burner” to Comiskey Park and won 21 games in 1972. Meanwhile, McKinney was a complete bust in the Bronx. He started out slow and never got better. By June he was playing down in Syracuse and the Yanks were using the infamous Celerino Sanchez as their starter at third. That November, McKinney’s Yankee career ended, when he was traded to Oakland in the deal that brought Matty Alou to New York.

This hitting star of the 1998 World Series, this former Yankee shortstop, this long-ago Yankee pitching prospect and this current Yankee catcher all share McKinney’s November 22nd birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1972 NYY 37 128 121 10 26 2 0 1 7 1 7 13 .215 .258 .256 .514
7 Yrs 341 980 886 79 199 28 2 20 100 4 77 124 .225 .286 .328 .615
OAK (4 yrs) 147 306 277 22 53 10 0 7 30 0 24 49 .191 .252 .303 .556
CHW (2 yrs) 157 546 488 47 120 16 2 12 63 3 46 62 .246 .312 .361 .672
NYY (1 yr) 37 128 121 10 26 2 0 1 7 1 7 13 .215 .258 .256 .514
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.

November 22 – Happy Birthday Wayne Tolleson

At the 1986 All Star break, just about everyone playing for and following that year’s Yankee team thought the club’s top acquisition priority was starting pitching. That’s why everyone was a bit surprised by the deal New York swung with the White Sox. The Yankees sent Chicago their starting catcher at the time, Ron Hassey and the organization’s top minor league shortstop, a guy named Carlos Martinez. In return, New York got power-hitting DH Ron Kittle, a new starting catcher in Joel Skinner and a scrappy middle infielder named Wayne Tolleson.

At the time of the deal, Tolleson, a native of Spartanburg, SC and an all-league star in baseball and football at Western Carolina was 30 years old. He had debuted in the big leagues in 1981 with Texas and became the Rangers starting shortstop in 1983. He was only five feet nine inches tall and weighed just 160 pounds, which helps explain why he would hit just 9 home runs during his decade in the big leagues. A switch hitter, he made up for his lack of pop with constant hustle, good speed and solid defense.

Yankee skipper, Lou Piniella made Tolleson his starting shortstop during the second half of the 1986 season, replacing Bobby Meacham. Tolleson put together a solid first half-season in pinstripes, averaging .284 and committing just five errors. That 1986 Yankee team finished with 90 wins but missed the postseason. Piniella stuck with Tolleson at short but his bat went ice cold and he hit just .221 during his first full season as a Yankee. That 1987 team again failed to reach the postseason and the New York front office decided Tolleson was no longer the answer at short. They went out and got Rafael Santana from the Mets and Tolleson his final three seasons in the Bronx as the Yankees top utility infielder.

This pitching star of the 1957 World Series, this hitting star of the 1998 World Series, this former third baseman and this current Yankee catching prospect all share Tolleson’s November 22nd birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1986 NYY 60 236 215 22 61 9 2 0 14 4 14 33 .284 .332 .344 .676
1987 NYY 121 399 349 48 77 4 0 1 22 5 43 72 .221 .306 .241 .547
1988 NYY 21 69 59 8 15 2 0 0 5 1 8 12 .254 .338 .288 .626
1989 NYY 80 160 140 16 23 5 2 1 9 5 16 23 .164 .255 .250 .505
1990 NYY 73 83 74 12 11 1 1 0 4 1 6 21 .149 .210 .189 .399
10 Yrs 863 2614 2322 301 559 60 17 9 133 108 219 384 .241 .307 .293 .600
TEX (5 yrs) 427 1357 1225 156 307 32 9 4 50 79 94 180 .251 .305 .301 .607
NYY (5 yrs) 355 947 837 106 187 21 5 2 54 16 87 161 .223 .298 .268 .565
CHW (1 yr) 81 310 260 39 65 7 3 3 29 13 38 43 .250 .342 .335 .677
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.

November 22 – Happy Birthday Lew Burdette

The Yankees certainly thought Lew Burdette was going to be a good big league pitcher, when they signed him to a contract out of the University of Richmond in 1947. He ended up spending most of his first year in minor league ball right in my hometown of Amsterdam, NY, pitching for New York’s Rugmakers farm team in the Class C Canadian-American League.

What might have prevented him from getting the opportunity to become a big winner for the Yankees was the fact that he was a right-handed finesse pitcher who depended on stuff instead of power to get batters out. When righthanders without a good fastball struggled with their stuff on the mound of the old Yankee Stadium, balls had a tendency to fly off the bats of the opposing team’s left-handed hitters and quickly get over the waist-high railing of the old Stadium’s short right field porch. A second reason Burdette probably didn’t get to spend a large part of his career wearing pinstripes was the plethora of starting pitching Yankee GM, George Weiss had assembled in the late 1940s. That stable included Vic Raschi, Allie Reynolds, Eddie Lopat, and Whitey Ford. Weiss also knew if he needed more pitching he could easily exchange young arms for veteran arms, which by the way is exactly what happened to Burdette.

After getting his first call-up to the Bronx in September of 1950 he appeared in two games out of Casey Stengel’s bullpen. Those would be his only two games as a Yankee because in August of the following season, Weiss sent Burdette and $50,000 to the Braves for veteran pitcher Johnny Sain. For the next three seasons, Sain was the best combination starter/reliever in baseball for New York. It was the Braves however, who ended up getting the better end of the deal. Burdette evolved into one of the best starting pitchers in the NL for the next decade. He won 179 games during his 13 seasons with that team which included back-to-back 20-victory seasons in 1958 and ’59. He teamed with Warren Spahn to give Milwaukee one of the Senior League’s elite starting pitching tandems. Together, they won 443 Braves games in thirteen years and led Milwaukee to two NL Pennants and, in what was Burdette’s finest big league moment, the 1957 World Championship versus his original big league employers, the Yankees..

In that Fall Classic, Burdette beat Bobby Shantz, 4-2, in Game 2. He next won Game 5 with a brilliant 1-0 shutout. Then, when Spahn came down with the flu, Burdette got the Game 7 start on just two-days’ rest and threw his second straight shutout in a 5-0 Brave victory. The two teams would meet again the following October and Burdette would beat the Yankees a fourth straight time before New York finally figured him out in Game 7, capturing the Series with a 6-2 victory over their nemesis.

Burdette was one of the meanest men in baseball. He once called Roy Campanella a “nigger” during a Braves-Dodger game. He was also a bit of a flake on the mound, always fidgeting with his arms and hands and talking to both himself and the baseball. He was dogged throughout his career by accusations that he threw a spitball. Burdette did little to dispel the rumor that he doctored the baseball, knowing it kept opposing hitters on edge. He died in 2007, at the age of 80.

This hitting star of the 1998 World Series, this former Yankee shortstop, this former Yankee third baseman and this current Yankee catching prospect share Burdette’s November 22nd birthday.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1950 NYY 0 0 6.75 2 0 0 0 0 0 1.1 3 1 1 0 0 0 2.250
18 Yrs 203 144 .585 3.66 626 373 128 158 33 31 3067.1 3186 1400 1246 289 628 1074 1.243
MLN (13 yrs) 179 120 .599 3.53 468 330 88 146 30 23 2638.0 2698 1163 1036 251 557 923 1.234
STL (2 yrs) 4 8 .333 3.58 29 14 5 3 0 2 108.0 116 53 43 7 19 48 1.250
CAL (2 yrs) 8 2 .800 3.67 73 0 30 0 0 6 98.0 96 42 40 8 12 35 1.102
CHC (2 yrs) 9 11 .450 4.94 35 20 3 8 2 0 151.1 178 91 83 18 23 45 1.328
PHI (1 yr) 3 3 .500 5.48 19 9 2 1 1 0 70.2 95 50 43 5 17 23 1.585
NYY (1 yr) 0 0 6.75 2 0 0 0 0 0 1.1 3 1 1 0 0 0 2.250
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.

November 22 – Happy Birthday Austin Romine

romineI remember not too long ago when Austin Romine was being labeled the second best minor league catching prospect in all of baseball. His problem at the time however, was that the one guy in front of him, Jesus Montero was also the property of the Yankee organization. Now at least Montero’s out of the picture but Romine still has a long way to go if he’s going to figure prominently in the Yankee’s future behind the plate plans.

This California-born son and brother of big leaguers, finally got his chance to dance in the big show in 2013, when Francisco Cervelli was again injured and lost for the season. He did OK defensively but got off to an absolutely horrible start with his bat. He was hitting just .103 for the Yankees at the end of May and you could tell he looked absolutely lost at the plate.

By July, however, Romine was a much more confident hitter and he was able too get his average up to as high as .227 by September of the 2013 season. Does he have the potential to become a .300 hitter, a 20-homer guy or drive in 100 runs in a season? I don’t think so and evidently, neither do the Yankees any more. New York’s front office made it clear that they will be pursuing free agent catcher Brian McCann this offseason, which means they see Romine as a backup catcher in the years ahead.

This hitting star of the 1998 World Seriesthis former Yankee shortstopthis long-ago Yankee pitching prospect and this former Yankee third baseman all share Romine’s November 22nd birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2011 NYY 9 20 19 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 .158 .200 .158 .358
2013 NYY 60 148 135 15 28 9 0 1 10 1 8 37 .207 .255 .296 .551
2 Yrs 69 168 154 17 31 9 0 1 10 1 9 42 .201 .248 .279 .528
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.

November 22 – Happy Birthday Ricky Ledee

Born in Ponce, Puerto Rico in 1973, Ledee was another prospect from the Yankee farm system who could not catch on permanently with the parent club, despite some flashes of brilliance during his three seasons in pinstripes. I know I won’t forget the great World Series he had in 1998 against San Diego. His .600 batting average and four RBIs helped New York sweep the Padres. He had his best regular season for the Yankees the following season, when he hit .276 in 88 games of action. He was hitting just .221 the following year when he was one of the three players Brian Cashman sent to Cleveland for David Justice. That deal ended up winning the 2000 Pennant for New York when Justice went on an unbelievable tear in the second half of that season. Ledee played until 2007, seeing his last big league action in a New York Met uniform.

There have been quite a few Yankees born on November 22. They include this former third baseman, this former shortstop, this onetime Yankee pitching prospect and this current Yankee catching prospect.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1998 NYY 42 87 79 13 19 5 2 1 12 3 7 29 .241 .299 .392 .691
1999 NYY 88 280 250 45 69 13 5 9 40 4 28 73 .276 .346 .476 .822
2000 NYY 62 220 191 23 46 11 1 7 31 7 26 39 .241 .332 .419 .751
10 Yrs 855 2307 2030 290 494 120 17 63 318 29 244 495 .243 .325 .412 .737
PHI (3 yrs) 290 677 581 89 144 35 3 28 95 3 91 136 .248 .350 .463 .813
NYY (3 yrs) 192 587 520 81 134 29 8 17 83 14 61 141 .258 .334 .442 .776
NYM (2 yrs) 44 79 68 10 11 4 0 2 7 1 9 16 .162 .256 .309 .565
LAD (2 yrs) 145 321 290 35 79 21 1 8 47 1 22 65 .272 .324 .434 .758
TEX (2 yrs) 136 512 455 56 106 27 4 6 74 9 48 108 .233 .309 .349 .659
SFG (1 yr) 31 60 53 6 6 2 0 0 4 1 5 20 .113 .200 .151 .351
CLE (1 yr) 17 71 63 13 14 2 1 2 8 0 8 9 .222 .310 .381 .691
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.