Results tagged ‘ march 3 ’

March 3 – Happy Birthday Bobby Munoz

munozThe Yankees signed this Puerto Rican giant in 1988 after selecting the 6’7″ right-hander in the 15th round of that year’s amateur draft. During his senior year at Miami Lakes High School in Hialeah, Florida Munoz was a star basketball player who had scholarship offers to play hoops at several big-time schools. In fact, he planned on playing on the hard court at UNLV but bad grades forced a change in those plans and he went to Palm Beach Community College instead. That’s when the Yanks drafted him and convinced him to give professional baseball a shot.

He spent four-plus seasons in the Yankee farm system, where he was converted into a closer when he reached Stump Merrill’s Columbus Clippers Triple A team in 1993. After starting out the season there with a 3-1 record and 10 saves, the Yanks called him up to the Bronx in late May to join Buck Showalter’s bullpen.

A confident 25-year-old at the time of his call-up, Munoz asked for and received Goose Gossage’s uniform number 54. He then spent his first month in pinstripes reminding New York fans of the Goose, pitching in a setup role for then-Yankee closer Steve Farr. By June 29th his record was 2-0 with 3 holds, 17 K’s and a solid 2.50 ERA.

Unfortunately, he faltered in the second half and then the Yankees grew concerned about his weight, which had gotten above the 260 mark by the end of his debut season. He got his weight back down that winter but was unpleasantly surprised at the beginning of the Yanks 1994 spring-training camp to find he had been dealt to the Phils in the deal that brought starting pitcher Terry Mulholland to New York.

The Phillies tried to make him a starter again and his 7-5 record in that role during the strike-shortened season of 1994 indicated there was some wisdom behind the move. But he hurt his arm the following year and went a combined 1-14 during his final five big league seasons.

This Hall-of-Fame Yankee outfielder, this former Yankee starter and this WWII hero all also were born on March 3rd.

Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1993 25 NYY AL 3 3 .500 5.32 38 0 12 0 0 0 45.2 48 27 27 1 26 33 1.620
7 Yrs 11 22 .333 5.17 100 38 23 1 0 1 278.1 324 181 160 30 119 153 1.592
PHI (4 yrs) 8 15 .348 4.84 38 30 2 1 0 1 178.2 205 116 96 19 66 93 1.517
MON (1 yr) 0 4 .000 5.14 15 7 4 0 0 0 42.0 53 25 24 6 21 21 1.762
NYY (1 yr) 3 3 .500 5.32 38 0 12 0 0 0 45.2 48 27 27 1 26 33 1.620
BAL (1 yr) 0 0 9.75 9 1 5 0 0 0 12.0 18 13 13 4 6 6 2.000
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/3/2014.

March 3 – Happy Birthday Chuck Cary

caryBy 1991 both the Yankees’ front-office decision making and the team’s starting pitching had gotten so bad that we fans were being told today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant was the best southpaw starter in the American League. I remember wanting to believe it but having a hard time doing so because I had been watching Cary struggle on the Yankee Stadium mound for two seasons by then. If he was indeed one of the best pitchers in the junior circuit he had been doing a masterful job disguising it.

The six foot four inch native of California had made his big league debut pitching out of the Detroit Tiger bullpen in 1985. He than spent the next four seasons bouncing back and forth between the minors and majors, Detroit had traded him to Atlanta in 1987 and when his inconsistency on the mound continued, the Braves gave him his outright release after the 1988 regular season.

That’s when the Yankees signed him as a free agent. He didn’t make New York’s roster out of spring training in 1989 but he was called up in May to pitch relief for Manager Dallas Green’s club. By late July, it was clear that season’s starting staff of Andy Hawkins, Clay Parker, Dave LaPoint, Greg Cadaret and Walt Terrell were not going to get New York into fall ball so Cary, who was pitching impressively out of the bullpen, was given an opportunity to join the rotation. He put together five consecutive quality starts, including two straight complete game victories. Though he tired in August and was hurt in September, his 4-4 record and his 3.26 ERA were at least something to build on.

Unfortunately, Cary’s building skills were not very good. In 1990 he became part of one of the worst performing starting rotations in Yankee franchise history. All five starters (the other four were Hawkins, LaPoint, Time Leary and Mike Witt) finished with losing records and not one of them won as many as ten games or had an ERA below 4.11. Cary went 6-12 with a 4.19 ERA. That Yankee team finished dead last in the AL Eastern Division.

That’s why the following spring, when Yankee pitching coach Jimmy Connor was telling every Yankee beat reporter who would listen to him that Cary could very well become a 20-game-winner that year, it made you wonder if there was another Chuck Cary on New York’s spring training roster. According to both Connor and Yankee manager Stump Merrill, Cary’s problem during his first two seasons in New York was that he had gotten away from throwing his screwball to right-handed hitters and was trying to overpower everyone with his fastball. The weakness with that rationale was that even when he was throwing the screwball, he had never won more than eight games in a season in the minors or the majors. Why would things be any different now? They weren’t.

Cary had a horrendous 1-6 start for New York in 1991 and an ERA that was just a shade under six runs per game. By June of that year he was back in Columbus and that October, the Yankee released him. He did get one more shot in the big leagues two years later with the White Sox and that was it. His final eight-season big league record was 14-26 (11-22 as a Yankee) with 3 saves and a 4.17 ERA. He may not have been able to start or close a big league game but he certainly was an all star when it came to starting and closing real estate deals. In his post baseball career, Cary has successfully sold billions of dollars worth of properties.

This Hall-of-Fame Yankee outfielderthis WWII hero and this one-time Yankee reliever were each also were born on March 3rd.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1989 NYY 4 4 .500 3.26 22 11 4 2 0 0 99.1 78 42 36 13 29 79 1.077
1990 NYY 6 12 .333 4.19 28 27 1 2 0 0 156.2 155 77 73 21 55 134 1.340
1991 NYY 1 6 .143 5.91 10 9 0 0 0 0 53.1 61 35 35 6 32 34 1.744
8 Yrs 14 26 .350 4.17 134 47 28 4 0 3 410.1 390 206 190 50 158 322 1.335
NYY (3 yrs) 11 22 .333 4.19 60 47 5 4 0 0 309.1 294 154 144 40 116 247 1.325
ATL (2 yrs) 1 1 .500 4.68 20 0 7 0 0 1 25.0 25 13 13 4 8 22 1.320
DET (2 yrs) 1 3 .250 3.42 38 0 12 0 0 2 55.1 49 27 21 5 23 43 1.301
CHW (1 yr) 1 0 1.000 5.23 16 0 4 0 0 0 20.2 22 12 12 1 11 10 1.597
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/21/2014.

March 3 – Happy Birthday Bud Souchock

I guarantee you that very few Yankee fans have ever heard of Steve Souchock. That’s too bad because the guy was a genuine hero, not on the baseball field but on the battlefield. Better known by his nickname of “Bud,” Souchock’s story begins in a town called Yatesboro, Pennsylvania, in the heart of coal-mining country, where he was born on March 3, 1919. He became a great high school athlete but he couldn’t think about college because with the country in the midst of a depression, his coal-miner Dad became ill and Souchock needed to find a job. He went to Detroit, hoping to work in the auto industry but grew homesick and returned to Yatesboro. He got a tryout with a Washington Senator farm team in nearby Greensberg. They offered him $65 a month to play for the team but within a year, the club went bankrupt and Souchok became the property of the New York Yankees. During the next three seasons he developed rapidly as a ballplayer but America’s entry into WWII changed his career path. He turned in his bat for a gun. Souchock enlisted in the army and was sent to France where he was made part of a tank destroyer battalion. He eventually became commander of his own gun crew. He would take that crew all the way to Germany during the final two years of the War, fighting so valiantly along the way that he was awarded both a silver and a bronze star. If you know any military veterans ask them what it takes to win either of these medals. Better yet, Google these commendations and find out for yourself. It will help you better understand the sort of exceptional soldier Steve Souchock actually was.

By the time the war ended and he got back to baseball, Souchock was already 27-years-old. To accommodate all the ballplayers returning from service to their country, Major League Baseball expanded the big league rosters from 25-to-30 players. Those five extra slots made it possible for Souchok to make his big league debut in pinstripes during the 1946 season and it was a pretty decent opening act for the returning war hero. He appeared in 46 games that season, mostly as a backup first baseman. He got 26 hits in 86 at bats to average .302 and hit his first two big league home runs. The following year, Souchock’s batting average fell 100 points and the well-stocked Yankees gave up on him, trading him to the White Sox. Souchok would spend just one season in the Windy City before returning to Detroit, where he was once a homesick auto worker. He would remain with the Tigers as a utility player for the final five years of his big league career, never earning a starting position during that time. He passed away in 2002 at the age of 83.

This Hall-of-Fame outfielderthis one-time Yankee reliever and this former Yankee starting pitcher also celebrate  birthdays today.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1946 NYY 47 94 86 15 26 3 3 2 10 0 7 13 .302 .362 .477 .838
1948 NYY 44 126 118 11 24 3 1 3 11 3 7 13 .203 .248 .322 .570
8 Yrs 473 1326 1227 163 313 58 20 50 186 15 88 164 .255 .307 .457 .764
DET (5 yrs) 298 829 771 108 204 39 11 38 128 7 49 100 .265 .311 .492 .803
NYY (2 yrs) 91 220 204 26 50 6 4 5 21 3 14 26 .245 .297 .387 .684
CHW (1 yr) 84 277 252 29 59 13 5 7 37 5 25 38 .234 .303 .409 .712
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/21/2014.