Results tagged ‘ kenny lofton ’

May 31 – Happy Birthday Kenny Lofton

George Steinbrenner probably stopped being a big Bernie Williams’ fan during the 1998 off-season. That was when his All Star center fielder successfully leveraged a free agent offer from the hated Red Sox to get the Boss to reluctantly OK an eight year contract for Bern-Baby-Bern, costing about 100 million Yankee dollars. When the team won the next two World Series after that signing, Steinbrenner must have felt a bit better and in fact, Bernie continued his All Star caliber play for the first four years of his new deal. But in 2003, Williams got hurt and his numbers dropped precipitously. After Florida beat New York in that year’s World Series, it was George Steinbrenner who ordered the Yankee front-office to go out and sign free agent, Kenny Lofton because the Boss felt he was the guy who could replace Williams as the Yankee center fielder. Joe Torre, however, had other ideas.

Lofton was indeed a great player. During most of first decade as a big leaguer, he had been the starting center fielder in Cleveland, where he had won four Gold Gloves, five consecutive AL stolen base titles, and averaged over .300. He also had a much stronger arm than Bernie and though he lacked Williams power, he was a run-scoring machine.

At the time New York signed him, however,  Lofton was 36 years old. He was also  two years older than Williams. He had failed to hit .300 his previous four seasons and had played on five different teams during the three previous years. Kenny’s best days were clearly behind him by the time he put on the pinstripes.

Torre therefore felt justified in sticking with Williams as his starting center fielder in 2004, but when Bernie did not have the bounce back year he was hoping for, the “play Lofton” lobby in the Yankee front office and media grew louder. Lofton himself tried not to stir the controversy, insisting he would do anything he was told, even park cars at Yankee Stadium, just to be a part of the team. He kept telling reporters he joined the Yankees to win a ring. But before too long, subtle complaints about his lack of playing time were finding their way to the media.

In the end, Lofton played just 83 games during his one season as a Yankee. After the Yankees suffered their historic collapse against the Red Sox in the 2004 ALCS, they traded Lofton to Philadelphia for a relief pitcher and probably would have traded Bernie too if they could find a team willing to pay a lions share of the $12 million they still owed him.

Kenny Lofton stuck around for three more seasons, retiring after the 2007 season. He ended his long and distinguished career with a .299 batting average, over 2,400 hits, 622 lifetime stolen bases but no rings.He was born on May 31, 1967, in East Chicago, Indiana.

Update: The above post was originally written in 2011. In 1992, Lofton finished second to a Milwaukee Brewer shortstop named Pat Listach in that season’s AL Rookie of the Year voting. Beginning in 1993, Kenny made six consecutive AL All Star teams and was never again selected to play in another mid-season classic. When he became eligible for Cooperstown consideration in 2013, he received just 3.2% of the vote which caused his name to be dropped from subsequent ballots. When asked about his low vote total, Lofton told a Cleveland Plain Dealer reporter that he blamed steroids for keeping him out of the Hall of Fame, explaining that because so many of his contemporaries used PEDs to pad their lifetime statistics, his own numbers looked less significant. Here’s a lineup of former Cleveland Indians’ players who also played for the Yankees during their big league career:

1b – Chris Chambliss
2b – Joe Gordon
3b – Graig Nettles
ss – Woodie Held
c – Ron Hassey
of – Rocky Colavito
of – Kenny Lofton
of – Charley Spikes
dh – Travis Hafner
p – CC Sabathia
p – Sam McDowell
p – Luis Tiant
p – Bartolo Colon
cl – Bob Wickman
rp – Dick Tidrow
mgr – Bob Lemon

Lofton shares today as a birthday with this former Yankee relief pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2004 NYY 83 313 276 51 76 10 7 3 18 7 31 27 .275 .346 .395 .741
17 Yrs 2103 9235 8120 1528 2428 383 116 130 781 622 945 1016 .299 .372 .423 .794
CLE (10 yrs) 1276 5767 5045 975 1512 244 66 87 518 452 611 652 .300 .375 .426 .800
PIT (1 yr) 84 374 339 58 94 19 4 9 26 18 28 29 .277 .333 .437 .770
SFG (1 yr) 46 205 180 30 48 10 3 3 9 7 23 22 .267 .353 .406 .758
PHI (1 yr) 110 406 367 67 123 15 5 2 36 22 32 41 .335 .392 .420 .811
ATL (1 yr) 122 564 493 90 164 20 6 5 48 27 64 83 .333 .409 .428 .837
TEX (1 yr) 84 363 317 62 96 16 3 7 23 21 39 28 .303 .380 .438 .818
LAD (1 yr) 129 522 469 79 141 15 12 3 41 32 45 42 .301 .360 .403 .763
CHC (1 yr) 56 236 208 39 68 13 4 3 20 12 18 22 .327 .381 .471 .852
NYY (1 yr) 83 313 276 51 76 10 7 3 18 7 31 27 .275 .346 .395 .741
HOU (1 yr) 20 79 74 9 15 1 0 0 0 2 5 19 .203 .253 .216 .469
CHW (1 yr) 93 406 352 68 91 20 6 8 42 22 49 51 .259 .348 .418 .766
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/31/2013.