Results tagged ‘ june 19 ’

June 19 – Happy Birthday Lou Gehrig

gehrigIf Yankee Stadium was a church June 19th would be a holy day of obligation for Yankee fans. The “Iron Horse” was Major League Baseball’s all-time greatest first baseman and perhaps the greatest athlete ever to be born in the Big Apple. In 17 years with New York he batted .340 lifetime and in seven World Series, he averaged .361. Lou had thirteen straight seasons in which he drove in and scored at least 100 runs. Along with his achievements on the ball field, his untimely illness, the grace with which he handled his misfortune, and his early death made Gehrig a true American hero.

Ruth, DiMaggio, and Mantle were each truly great Yankees on the field who lived unhappy, personal lives. I always found it ironic that Gehrig, the Yankee legend with an extremely strong marriage and idyllic private life, never got the opportunity to enjoy his retirement years.

Update: I originally wrote the above post in June of 2008. Since that time I learned something I never knew about Gehrig. I had always thought that after he was diagnosed with ALS at the Mayo Clinic, he simply returned to his home in the Bronx and waited to die. But Gehrig, who would live until June 2, 1941, over two years after his fatal diagnosis, actually accepted Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia’s appointment to the New York City Parole Commission in October of 1939. The appointment was for a ten-year-term and the position paid a salary of $5,700 per year. Besides sympathy for one of his city’s sports heroes, LaGuardia’s rationalization for selecting the Iron Horse for this job was sound. The Mayor was quoted in the New York Times after making the announcement, “I believe that he will not only be an able and intelligent commissioner but that he will be an inspiration and a hope to many of the younger boys who had gotten into trouble. Surely the misfortune of some of the young men will compare as something trivial with what Mr. Gehrig has so cheerfully and courageously faced.” LaGuardia went on to say that Gehrig had told him he wanted to dedicate his remaining days to public service and the Yankee legend meant what he said. Gehrig showed up for work regularly and did not stop doing so until just a month before he died, when he became to weak to leave his home.

Gehrig shares his birthday with another former Yankee first baseman.

Here are Gehrig’s incredible regular season statistics as a Yankee player:

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1923 NYY 13 29 26 6 11 4 1 1 9 0 2 5 .423 .464 .769 1.234
1924 NYY 10 13 12 2 6 1 0 0 5 0 1 3 .500 .538 .583 1.122
1925 NYY 126 497 437 73 129 23 10 20 68 6 46 49 .295 .365 .531 .896
1926 NYY 155 696 572 135 179 47 20 16 109 6 105 73 .313 .420 .549 .969
1927 NYY 155 717 584 149 218 52 18 47 175 10 109 84 .373 .474 .765 1.240
1928 NYY 154 677 562 139 210 47 13 27 142 4 95 69 .374 .467 .648 1.115
1929 NYY 154 694 553 127 166 32 10 35 126 4 122 68 .300 .431 .584 1.015
1930 NYY 154 703 581 143 220 42 17 41 174 12 101 63 .379 .473 .721 1.194
1931 NYY 155 738 619 163 211 31 15 46 184 17 117 56 .341 .446 .662 1.108
1932 NYY 156 708 596 138 208 42 9 34 151 4 108 38 .349 .451 .621 1.072
1933 NYY 152 687 593 138 198 41 12 32 139 9 92 42 .334 .424 .605 1.030
1934 NYY 154 690 579 128 210 40 6 49 165 9 109 31 .363 .465 .706 1.172
1935 NYY 149 673 535 125 176 26 10 30 119 8 132 38 .329 .466 .583 1.049
1936 NYY 155 719 579 167 205 37 7 49 152 3 130 46 .354 .478 .696 1.174
1937 NYY 157 700 569 138 200 37 9 37 159 4 127 49 .351 .473 .643 1.116
1938 NYY 157 689 576 115 170 32 6 29 114 6 107 75 .295 .410 .523 .932
1939 NYY 8 33 28 2 4 0 0 0 1 0 5 1 .143 .273 .143 .416
17 Yrs 2164 9663 8001 1888 2721 534 163 493 1992 102 1508 790 .340 .447 .632 1.080
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/19/2013.

June 19 – Happy Birthday Doug Mientkiewicz

When I was a kid, pick-up baseball games were commonplace. Back then, there seemed to be at least ten guys you could call at any time of day or night to meet up for a game. You’d decide where to play based on the total number of kids who showed up. Four man sides worked just fine in the old mill yard across from my Grandmother’s house. It was a small area, boxed in by buildings on both sides and a huge green fully enclosed metal walking ramp that led from the third floor of the mill to the street level in dead center. That ramp served as our version of the “Green Monster.” We also played in a Veterans’ park at the western most end of our city, where a huge memorial with a life-sized bronze soldier standing guard at the top, served as both our center field wall and permanent spectator. Second base at the park was a cast iron silver painted urn that caused lots of bleeding injuries to both aggressive base runners and inattentive fielders.

When we could get eighteen guys together, we’d head down to the huge grass field that sat alongside one of the locks on the Mohawk River. Even back in the early sixties, when neighborhood kids use to actually play with each other, getting eighteen kids together was not easy and usually required a mixing of ages. That’s why, whenever we’d play down by the river, there’d always be at least one “older” kid who was strong enough to drive a ball the three hundred or so feet that separated home plate from the then-pretty-polluted Mohawk. Every official home run down by the river was a “Walk-off” home run because it meant the ball needed to play the game was gone for good and everyone had to go home.

It was always a lack of a simple ball that disrupted many of those glorious contests during my childhood. After all, most kids brought their own gloves to these games and at least a couple of the guys would bring bats. Gloves and bats weren’t perishable but those damn balls seemed to disappear in a hurry. That’s why, the most serious offense any kid could commit was taking the game ball home with him before that game was actually over. We used to let guys from our neighborhood who didn’t know a baseball bat from an umbrella play in those games simply because they owned a new baseball. Of course, the older guys who ran the games then pulled every trick in the book to prevent the talentless ball-owners from coming to bat or making a play in the field during the contest.

One of their favorite techniques was  “No Ralph you’re not up this time around, Joey is going to pinch hit for you.” In those long ago games in the Veterans’ park, I can remember kids being told to go play the field behind the huge memorial, where they would stare up at the butt of the huge bronze soldier waiting for a ball to fly over the huge granite edifice so they could retrieve it. Eventually, some of these persecuted ball-suppliers would get wise to the exploitation being put upon them and would grab their ball and go home. This of course was considered a mortal sin in our neighborhood, punishable by banishment from all future neighborhood sporting activities, sometimes for life, or at the very least until you showed up at one of these future events with the only ball again.

The above memories were the first things that flashed through my mind when I heard that today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant grabbed the game ball after the last out of the final game of the 2004 World Series and brought it home with him. Doug Mientkiewicz had replaced David Ortiz at first base for the Boston Red Sox earlier in that game which is why he caught pitcher, Keith Foulke’s throw to first to end that contest and complete Boston’s four-game sweep of the Cardinals in that Fall Classic. He then just kept the ball and took it home with him. When someone from the Red Sox eventually asked for it, Mientkiewicz refused to hand it over, explaining he could sell it for enough money to cover his own kid’s college costs. Needless to say, that line did not go over to well with Red Sox Nation. He eventually agreed to loan the ball to the Red Sox.

Unfortunately for Mientkiewicz, keeping that ball will be what he’s remembered for most. Even though he was one of baseball’s best defensive first baseman during his 12-years in the big leagues and a Gold Glove winner, it will be the baseball he wouldn’t give back that defines him.

Three years after the incident, the Yankees signed the player nicknamed “Eye Chart” to play first base so that Jason Giambi’s porous glove could be removed from the lineup. He got into 72 games that year and hit a respectable .277. A broken wrist he suffered when Mike Lowell collided with him at first base disrupted his season and then he went hitless for New York during the 2007 postseason. The Yankees let him go and he signed with the Pirates the following year.

Mientkiewicz was a high school teammate of A-Rod’s in Florida when their team won that state’s baseball championship. He also won a Gold Medal as part of the US baseball team that beat Cuba in the 2000 Olympics. His last big league game was in a Dodger uniform in 2009. He retired with a .271 career average, 899 hits and that damn baseball. He also happens to share his birthday with another Yankee first baseman who I’m sure was the source of plenty of lost baseballs when he was a kid.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2007 NYY 72 192 166 26 46 12 0 5 24 0 16 23 .277 .349 .440 .789
12 Yrs 1087 3844 3312 422 899 221 11 66 405 14 438 472 .271 .360 .405 .765
MIN (7 yrs) 643 2505 2147 273 590 146 6 43 266 11 300 308 .275 .367 .408 .776
KCR (1 yr) 91 361 314 37 89 24 2 4 43 3 35 50 .283 .359 .411 .770
NYM (1 yr) 87 313 275 36 66 13 0 11 29 0 32 39 .240 .322 .407 .729
PIT (1 yr) 125 334 285 37 79 19 2 2 30 0 44 28 .277 .374 .379 .753
BOS (1 yr) 49 119 107 13 23 6 1 1 10 0 10 18 .215 .286 .318 .603
LAD (1 yr) 20 20 18 0 6 1 0 0 3 0 1 6 .333 .400 .389 .789
NYY (1 yr) 72 192 166 26 46 12 0 5 24 0 16 23 .277 .349 .440 .789
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/19/2013.