Results tagged ‘ hall-of-fame ’

March 4 – Happy Birthday Dazzy Vance

Dazzy Vance is in the Hall of Fame even though he did not win his first Major League game until he was 31 years old. What took him so long? He spent almost a decade, from 1912 until 1921 in the minor leagues trying to figure out how to throw his lightening quick fastball over the plate for strikes. Before he came up for good with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1922, Vance spent about four seasons in the Yankee organization. New York brought him up to the big leagues for two look-see’s. The first time was 1915. Vance was a 17-game winner that year pitching single A ball in St. Joseph, MO. He got into eight games for New York, losing all three of his decisions. He didn’t get his next taste of the Big Apple until four years later, in 1918 and it did not taste good. Dazzy got shelled in both his Yankee relief appearances that season and since he was 27 at the time, it seemed as if his chances of making the big leagues were over. But the persistent Vance went back to the minors and toiled for four more years.

In 1922, Brooklyn purchased his contract and dumped him immediately into their starting rotation. Dazzy won 18 games in his full-fledged rookie season and led the NL in strikeouts. For the next ten seasons he was one of the very best pitchers in baseball. He ended up winning seven-straight strikeout titles. In 1924 he had one of the greatest seasons any big league pitcher has ever had, leading the NL in victories (28), ERA (2.16) and K’s (262.) By the time his career was over, in 1935, the 44-year-old right-hander had put together a lifetime record of 197-140. That’s on top of the 139 victories he had accumulated in the minor leagues. In 1955, Vance was inducted into the Hall of Fame.

His real name was Charles. He was born in Orient,IA on March 4, 1891. He passed away in 1961.

Ironically, Dazzy shares his March 4th birthday with this other Major League baseball star with a well-known nickname, who also got big league call-ups as a Yankee early in his career, who also didn’t make it to the major leagues for good until he was 31 years old and when he did, he also became a star for Brooklyn.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1915 NYY 0 3 .000 3.54 8 3 4 1 0 0 28.0 23 14 11 1 16 18 1.393
1918 NYY 0 0 15.43 2 0 1 0 0 0 2.1 9 5 4 0 2 0 4.714
16 Yrs 197 140 .585 3.24 442 349 53 216 29 11 2966.2 2809 1246 1068 132 840 2045 1.230
BRO (12 yrs) 190 131 .592 3.17 378 328 36 212 29 7 2757.2 2579 1135 972 123 764 1918 1.212
NYY (2 yrs) 0 3 .000 4.45 10 3 5 1 0 0 30.1 32 19 15 1 18 18 1.648
STL (2 yrs) 7 3 .700 3.59 47 15 11 3 0 4 158.0 167 68 63 7 42 100 1.323
CIN (1 yr) 0 2 .000 7.50 6 2 1 0 0 0 18.0 28 21 15 1 11 9 2.167
PIT (1 yr) 0 1 .000 10.13 1 1 0 0 0 0 2.2 3 3 3 0 5 0 3.000
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/21/2014.

New York Yankees in the Hall of Fame

NB_HOF_logo

The list below identifies New York Yankees who have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame as of December 9, 2013. The list is presented in the order of induction date with the most recent inductee listed first and includes players, managers and team executives who played or worked for the Yankees at any time in franchise history, including the 1903-1912 Highlanders and the 1901-1902 Orioles. The year listed along-side each individual’s name is the year that person was inducted.

Joe Torre 2014

Bobby Cox 2014

Jacob Rupert 2013

Joe Gordon 2009

Ricky Henderson 2009

Rich Gossage 2008

Wade Boggs 2005

Dave Winfield 2001

Lee MacPhail 1998

Phil Niekro 1997

Leo Durocher 1994

Phil Rizzuto 1994

Reggie Jackson 1993

Tony Lazzeri 1991

Gaylord Perry 1991

Catfish Hunter 1987

Enos Slaughter 1985

Johnny Mize 1981

Larry MacPhail 1978

Joe Sewell 1977

Bucky Harris 1975

Whitey Ford 1974

Mickey Mantle 1974

Yogi Berra 1972

Lefty Gomez 1972

Joe Kelley 1971

George Weiss 1971

Earl Combs 1970

Stan Coveleski 1969

Waite Hoyt 1969

Branch Rickey 1967

Red Ruffing 1967

Casey Stengel 1966

Burleigh Grimes 1964

Miller Huggins 1964

Bill McKechnie 1962

Joe McCarthy 1957

Home Run Baker 1955

Joe DiMaggio 1955

Dazzy Vance 1955

Bill Dickey 1954

Ed Barrow 1953

Paul Waner 1952

Herb Pennock 1948

Frank Chance 1946

Jack Chesbro 1946

Clark Griffith 1946

Joe McGinnity 1946

Roger Bresnahan 1945

Wilbert Robinson 1945

Lou Gehrig 1939

Willie Keeler 1939

John McGraw 1937

Babe Ruth 1936

Hall of Fame voters unfortunately got it right this time

I was not disappointed with the Hall of Fame vote yesterday, just sad. Sad because the lack of an inductee emphasized for me just how much “cheating” has screwed up our sports and our society. Forgive me for the simplicity Bill James, but it used to be that if you hit 400 home runs, got 3,000 hits or won 200 games as a pitcher, you’d have a good shot at getting into Cooperstown. Not any more. Why? Because those numbers and the athletes who compile them can’t be trusted. Just like bicycle race winners, 100 meter dash times, and 260 pound chiseled NFL linebackers with sprinter speed can’t be trusted. We will never again take performance on the athletic field of competition at face value. Why? Because greed and ego have turned the pursuit of victory and honor into anything but that. Now I’m not naive enough to believe that every one of the existing Hall-of-Famers were men of sterling character and I’m certain that if they had the opportunity to take PEDs many would have. But now that we have actual proof that some on the list of eligible candidates did, the absence of honor and honesty is no longer a question and that makes me sad.

November 25 – Happy Birthday Joe DiMaggio

Today is like a holy day of obligation for Big Apple sports enthusiasts. On this date in 1916, the “Great DiMaggio” was born in Martinez, CA.  He was and probably still is one of the most revered athletes in our country and perhaps the world. As a kid growing up, all I knew about DiMaggio was based on his statistics as a player, the nostalgic observations of sportswriters and the often embellished memories of the older generation of Yankee fans who were my neighbors on the west end of Amsterdam. While his stats indeed indicated DiMaggio was a great player, the latter two sources considered him a “God.” In fact, during my childhood, one of the most frequently heard lines in any argument between a young fan of Mickey Mantle and an older fan of Joe DiMaggio was  “Mantle couldn’t carry DiMaggio’s jock strap.”

I’ve since read quite a few books about DiMaggio and about the Yankees during the DiMaggio era. The last one I read was the critical 2001 biography by Ben Cramer. I’ve come to the conclusion that much of the aura that surrounded the Yankee Clipper was based on his amazing baseball skills and achievements. But a large part of it was also due to the fact that the New York and national sports media of his era worshiped the guy and Joe maneuvered that worship brilliantly.  This level of celebrity pandering by the media has become much less possible because today’s athletes get too much exposure. For example, Yankee fans can watch their team play every single spring training, regular and postseason game on high definition, big-screen TVs. Sportswriters are no longer free to embellish something that everyone is seeing with their own eyes. The Internet and the proliferation of sports bloggers has also made hiding a star player’s off-the-field behavior nearly impossible. Just ask A-Rod.

I would have loved to watch Joe DiMaggio play the game but I didn’t get the opportunity. As a die hard Yankee fan, I celebrate his accomplishments. But I believe the truth is that DiMaggio eventually got wrapped up in his own press clippings to the point that he actually believed he was perfect and that everyone else was out to get him. It was the pressure of maintaining that image that made DiMaggio a bitter man, the superstar who would not say a single word to a young Mickey Mantle during the Mick’s rookie season, who thought Casey Stengel was trying to embarrass him into retirement, and who pretty much abandoned his only son. Why is it that people who have so much going for them have such a difficult time just being happy?

Several years ago, I took my boys to a Yankee game and we were sitting next to a young Yankee fan who loved Don Mattingly. He knew everything about the then current team but not so much about Yankee history so when he told me that Mattingly was a better hitter than Mantle was, I couldn’t help myself. I found myself saying, “Son, Mattingly couldn’t carry Mickey Mantle’s jock strap.” I have to admit the line felt good coming out of my mouth until the completely unfazed kid responded with “What’s a jock strap, mister?”

DiMaggio shares his November 25th birthday with this former Yankee infielder, this Yankee outfielder and this more recent Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1936 NYY 138 669 637 132 206 44 15 29 125 4 24 39 .323 .352 .576 .928
1937 NYY 151 692 621 151 215 35 15 46 167 3 64 37 .346 .412 .673 1.085
1938 NYY 145 660 599 129 194 32 13 32 140 6 59 21 .324 .386 .581 .967
1939 NYY 120 524 462 108 176 32 6 30 126 3 52 20 .381 .448 .671 1.119
1940 NYY 132 572 508 93 179 28 9 31 133 1 61 30 .352 .425 .626 1.051
1941 NYY 139 622 541 122 193 43 11 30 125 4 76 13 .357 .440 .643 1.083
1942 NYY 154 680 610 123 186 29 13 21 114 4 68 36 .305 .376 .498 .875
1946 NYY 132 567 503 81 146 20 8 25 95 1 59 24 .290 .367 .511 .878
1947 NYY 141 601 534 97 168 31 10 20 97 3 64 32 .315 .391 .522 .913
1948 NYY 153 669 594 110 190 26 11 39 155 1 67 30 .320 .396 .598 .994
1949 NYY 76 329 272 58 94 14 6 14 67 0 55 18 .346 .459 .596 1.055
1950 NYY 139 606 525 114 158 33 10 32 122 0 80 33 .301 .394 .585 .979
1951 NYY 116 482 415 72 109 22 4 12 71 0 61 36 .263 .365 .422 .787
13 Yrs 1736 7673 6821 1390 2214 389 131 361 1537 30 790 369 .325 .398 .579 .977
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/24/2013.

October 21 – Happy Birthday Whitey Ford

The argument is easy to make that Whitey Ford is the greatest Yankee starting pitcher of all time. “The Chairman of the Board” was a winner from the get-go, helping New York capture the 1950 pennant in his rookie season by winning nine of ten regular season decisions. He then pitched eight and two thirds innings of shutout ball to earn his first of ten World Series victories in that year’s Fall Classic against the Philadelphia Whiz Kids.

After a two-year hitch in the military, Ford rejoined the Yankees in 1953 and began a streak of thirteen consecutive winning seasons. I firmly believe that if anyone other than Casey Stengel managed the Yankees during the fifties, Ford would have had a lot more regular season victories. Stengel liked to manipulate his rotation so he could match up Ford against the opposing team’s best pitcher, which caused Whitey to average about six to eight less starts per season than the aces of other Major League teams during that decade. When Ralph Houk took over from Stengel in 1961, he gave Ford the ball every fourth game down the stretch and the southpaw responded well to the regularity and extra workload. He had his best year in 1961, when he captured the Cy Young Award with a stunning 25-4 record. In 1963, he went 24-7 and in 1964, eight of his seventeen victories were complete game shutouts.

A native New Yorker, Whitey, country bumpkin Mickey Mantle, and the fiery Californian, Billy Martin, formed a friendship triumvirate that created a lot of success for the Yankees on the field but lots of trouble off of it. Since Ford only played once every five games, he could party hard six nights a week and rest up the evening before his scheduled start. As position players, Mantle and Martin didn’t have that luxury and there were many an early afternoon game when Whitey would sit in the dugout laughing at the play of his two hung over drinking buddies while Stengel fumed.

Ford retired in 1967 after spending his entire seventeen-year career in a Yankee uniform. His 236 regular season victories are still number 1 on New York’s all-time list. His incredible .690 career winning percentage is also still the best of any pitcher with 300 or more career decisions.

Back in 2008, during the ESPN television broadcast of the final game at Yankee Stadium, Ford and his longtime battery mate and fellow Hall-of-Famer Yogi Berra, were invited up to the broadcast booth to share their memories of playing in the Stadium. Those thirty minutes listening to two of my heroes talk about their Yankee playing days was the personal highlight of that 2008 baseball season. Whitey turns 84-years-old today. How did all those years come and go so fast?

Whitey shares his October 21st birthday with former Yankee pitcher, Bill Bevens and former Yankee catcher, John Flaherty.

Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1950 21 NYY AL 9 1 .900 2.81 20 12 5 7 2 1 112.0 87 39 35 7 52 59 1.241
1953 24 NYY AL 18 6 .750 3.00 32 30 2 11 3 0 207.0 187 77 69 13 110 110 1.435
1954 25 NYY AL 16 8 .667 2.82 34 28 4 11 3 1 210.2 170 72 66 10 101 125 1.286
1955 26 NYY AL 18 7 .720 2.63 39 33 4 18 5 2 253.2 188 83 74 20 113 137 1.187
1956 27 NYY AL 19 6 .760 2.47 31 30 1 18 2 1 225.2 187 70 62 13 84 141 1.201
1957 28 NYY AL 11 5 .688 2.57 24 17 2 5 0 0 129.1 114 46 37 10 53 84 1.291
1958 29 NYY AL 14 7 .667 2.01 30 29 1 15 7 1 219.1 174 62 49 14 62 145 1.076
1959 30 NYY AL 16 10 .615 3.04 35 29 4 9 2 1 204.0 194 82 69 13 89 114 1.387
1960 31 NYY AL 12 9 .571 3.08 33 29 1 8 4 0 192.2 168 76 66 15 65 85 1.209
1961 32 NYY AL 25 4 .862 3.21 39 39 0 11 3 0 283.0 242 108 101 23 92 209 1.180
1962 33 NYY AL 17 8 .680 2.90 38 37 0 7 0 0 257.2 243 90 83 22 69 160 1.211
1963 34 NYY AL 24 7 .774 2.74 38 37 1 13 3 1 269.1 240 94 82 26 56 189 1.099
1964 35 NYY AL 17 6 .739 2.13 39 36 2 12 8 1 244.2 212 67 58 10 57 172 1.099
1965 36 NYY AL 16 13 .552 3.24 37 36 1 9 2 1 244.1 241 97 88 22 50 162 1.191
1966 37 NYY AL 2 5 .286 2.47 22 9 7 0 0 0 73.0 79 33 20 8 24 43 1.411
1967 38 NYY AL 2 4 .333 1.64 7 7 0 2 1 0 44.0 40 11 8 2 9 21 1.114
16 Yrs 236 106 .690 2.75 498 438 35 156 45 10 3170.1 2766 1107 967 228 1086 1956 1.215
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/21/2013.