Results tagged ‘ february 5 ’

February 5 – Happy Birthday Mike Heath

Today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant had the opportunity to replace the great Thurman Munson as the Yankees’ starting catcher. This opportunity arose for the Tampa, FL native not in 1979, when Munson was tragically killed in his plane crash, but the year before, when the great Yankee catcher was still an All Star.

For Yankee fans, 1978 will always be an historic year. It was the season of the great comeback, when New York came from 14 games behind their hated rival, the Red Sox, on July 18th to capture the AL East crown. As that year’s All Star break approached, George Steinbrenner was panicking. He was certain he could make better lineup decisions than Billy Martin, so he decided to go ahead and make them. At the time, Martin was near a nervous breakdown. He was fighting with Steinbrenner, feuding with Reggie Jackson and drinking way too much. He loved being Manager of the Yankees so much that he let “The Boss” make his moves.

Steinbrenner benched veteran Roy White and inserted Gary Thomasson in left field. He also ordered Martin to play Munson in right field to rest the aging catcher’s knees and revive his batting stroke. He wanted to platoon Lou Piniella and Reggie Jackson at DH and start the 23-year-old rookie catcher, Mike Heath, who had just been called up from the Yankees’ double A team in West Haven, CT.

Steinbrenner’s revised lineup made their debut on July 13, a Thursday afternoon game against the White Sox, at Yankee Stadium. They lost four of the next five and in that fifth game; Billy Martin gave Reggie Jackson the infamous bunt sign and then tried to remove it. When Jackson defied Martin, Billy benched the slugger, with Steinbrenner’s approval. The Yankees proceeded to win five straight and Heath was actually doing fine both behind and at the plate, keeping his average right around .300. That’s when Martin made his famous “One’s a born liar and the others a convicted one” comment that got him fired.

The rest is Yankee history. Bob Lemon replaced Martin and Bucky Dent’s blast a few weeks’ later capped off the best Cinderella comeback story in New York’s franchise history. What happened to Heath?

Lemon continued to start the rookie at catcher for about a week, but when Heath’s offense cooled off a bit, the Manager put Munson back behind the plate so he could get both Piniella’s and Jackson’s bats back in the lineup. Lemon also began using Cliff Johnson as Munson’s primary backup receiver and Heath saw his playing time pretty much disappear during New York’s historic stretch run.

He did make the postseason roster but right after the Yankees won their second straight World Series against the Dodgers, Heath was included in the Sparky Lyle trade to Texas that brought Dave Righetti to New York. He ended up on Oakland in 1979 and became a very good big league catcher, primarily for the A’s and then the Tigers for the next fourteen seasons.

Would Heath have been able to replace Munson the following season, after the tragic plane crash? I don’t think so. His offense was probably not strong enough to keep him in that Yankee lineup.

Also born on February 5th is this first starting shortstop in Yankee franchise history and this one-time prized Yankee prospect.

Year Age Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1978 23 NYY AL 33 99 92 6 21 3 1 0 8 0 4 9 .228 .265 .283 .548
14 Yrs 1325 4586 4212 462 1061 173 27 86 469 54 278 616 .252 .300 .367 .667
OAK (7 yrs) 725 2653 2438 280 612 99 18 47 281 32 158 312 .251 .296 .364 .660
DET (5 yrs) 453 1468 1353 153 360 60 6 34 143 20 86 233 .266 .314 .395 .708
ATL (1 yr) 49 150 139 4 29 3 1 1 12 0 7 26 .209 .250 .266 .516
STL (1 yr) 65 216 190 19 39 8 1 4 25 2 23 36 .205 .293 .321 .614
NYY (1 yr) 33 99 92 6 21 3 1 0 8 0 4 9 .228 .265 .283 .548
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/14/2014.

February 5 – Happy Birthday Roger Peckinpaugh

peck1.jpgHe was the first starting shortstop in New York Yankee team history. Peckinpaugh won the job in 1913, the same year the New York Highlanders officially became the New York Yankees. He kept that position for the next eight seasons, long enough to become the first Yankee starting shortstop to play in the old Yankee Stadium and also to play for New York in a World Series. He was a brilliant fielder, an excellent base runner and a fierce and volatile competitor. In 1914, when team skipper Frank Chance was fired with 20-games left in the regular season, New York made Peckinpaugh player/manager and the Yanks finished the season 10-10 under his stewardship. His lifetime totals in Pinstripes included 1,170 hits, over 1,200 games played, a .257 batting average and 143 stolen bases.

In December of 1921, Roger was part a seven player swap with the Red Sox that included Boston’s starting shortstop, Everett Scott. By 1925, Peckinpaugh had been traded to Washington, where he hit .294 and was named AL MVP for leading the Senators to the World Series. But in that year’s Fall Classic against the Pirates, Peckinpaugh committed the unbelievable total of eight errors, which remains a Series record, today. He ended his playing career in 1927 and re-started his managing career the following season as skipper of the Indians. He managed for seven seasons and then took a job in Cleveland’s front office. Roger died in 1977, at the age of 86.

Since today’s post is about the first great shortstop in pinstripe history, let’s take a look at my list of the five greatest Yankee shortstops ever:

Number 1 – Derek Jeter: Five rings, eight pennants, seventeen postseasons, 3,000 hits. Simply the best.
Number 2 – Phil Rizzuto: Ted Williams described Scooter as one of the greatest players of his era. Nine pennants, seven rings, an MVP and Hall-of-Famer.
Number 3 – Frankie Crosetti: The starting shortstop on 6 World Championship teams. A total of nine pennants and eight rings as a player. Reached 1,500 hits and 1,000 runs during his career.
Number 4 – Peckinpaugh
Number 5 – Tony Kubek: His three rings, seven pennants and 1,109 hits during a brief nine-year career easily beats out Bucky Dent for the final spot.

Also born on this date was this former New York receiver, and this one-time prized Yankee prospect.

Peckinpaugh’s Yankee regular season and career playing stats:

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1913 NYY 95 373 340 35 91 10 7 1 32 19 24 47 .268 .316 .347 .663
1914 NYY 157 635 570 55 127 14 6 3 51 38 51 73 .223 .288 .284 .572
1915 NYY 142 625 540 67 119 18 7 5 44 19 49 72 .220 .289 .307 .596
1916 NYY 145 631 552 65 141 22 8 4 58 18 62 50 .255 .332 .346 .678
1917 NYY 148 629 543 63 141 24 7 0 41 17 64 46 .260 .340 .330 .670
1918 NYY 122 516 446 59 103 15 3 0 43 12 43 41 .231 .303 .278 .581
1919 NYY 122 537 453 89 138 20 2 7 33 10 59 37 .305 .390 .404 .794
1920 NYY 139 623 534 109 144 26 6 8 54 8 72 47 .270 .356 .386 .742
1921 NYY 149 694 577 128 166 25 7 8 71 2 84 44 .288 .380 .397 .777
17 Yrs 2012 8383 7233 1006 1876 256 75 48 739 205 814 670 .259 .336 .335 .672
NYY (9 yrs) 1219 5263 4555 670 1170 174 53 36 427 143 508 457 .257 .334 .342 .676
WSH (5 yrs) 639 2566 2180 293 583 72 18 11 261 46 268 146 .267 .349 .332 .681
CLE (3 yrs) 86 308 281 20 59 4 1 1 28 14 17 61 .210 .258 .242 .500
CHW (1 yr) 68 246 217 23 64 6 3 0 23 2 21 6 .295 .360 .350 .710
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/14/2014.

Peckinpaugh’s managerial stats:

Rk Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% G Finish
1 1914 23 New York Yankees AL 2nd of 2 10 10 .500 20 6
New York Yankees 1 year 10 10 .500 20 6.0
Cleveland Indians 7 years 490 481 .505 975 4.4
8 years 500 491 .505 995 4.6
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/14/2014.