Results tagged ‘ february 27 ’

February 27 – Happy Birthday Greg Cadaret

cadaretThe nice thing about writing a blog like this is that in doing the research necessary, I learn things about my all-time favorite team that I never knew or realized. For example, I remember when Greg Cadaret wore pinstripes but I had no idea he actually appeared in over 180 games for New York during the three and a half seasons he pitched as a Yankee. His best season in the Bronx was 1991 when he went 8-6 out of the bullpen with three saves and a 3.62 ERA. He came to New York in the 1989 in-season trade that sent Ricky Henderson back to Oakland. The Yankees sold him to Cincinnati after the 1992 season. Greg was born in Detroit on February 27, 1962.

Another Yankee celebrating a birthday on February 27 is this former catcher who is the only man in MLB history to have caught two perfect games during his career. This former catcher/coach and another former Yankee reliever also share Cadaret’s birthday.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1989 NYY 5 5 .500 4.58 20 13 1 3 1 0 92.1 109 53 47 7 38 66 1.592
1990 NYY 5 4 .556 4.15 54 6 9 0 0 3 121.1 120 62 56 8 64 80 1.516
1991 NYY 8 6 .571 3.62 68 5 17 0 0 3 121.2 110 52 49 8 59 105 1.389
1992 NYY 4 8 .333 4.25 46 11 9 1 1 1 103.2 104 53 49 12 74 73 1.717
10 Yrs 38 32 .543 3.99 451 35 120 4 2 14 724.1 716 351 321 58 403 539 1.545
NYY (4 yrs) 22 23 .489 4.12 188 35 36 4 2 7 439.0 443 220 201 35 235 324 1.544
OAK (3 yrs) 11 4 .733 3.24 113 0 29 0 0 3 139.0 118 57 50 8 79 108 1.417
ANA (2 yrs) 1 2 .333 3.91 54 0 17 0 0 1 50.2 49 22 22 7 23 48 1.421
KCR (1 yr) 1 1 .500 2.93 13 0 3 0 0 0 15.1 14 5 5 0 7 2 1.370
TEX (1 yr) 0 0 4.70 11 0 3 0 0 0 7.2 11 4 4 1 3 5 1.826
CIN (1 yr) 2 1 .667 4.96 34 0 15 0 0 1 32.2 40 19 18 3 23 23 1.929
DET (1 yr) 1 0 1.000 3.60 17 0 9 0 0 2 20.0 17 9 8 0 16 14 1.650
TOR (1 yr) 0 1 .000 5.85 21 0 8 0 0 0 20.0 24 15 13 4 17 15 2.050
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/2/2014.

February 27 – Happy Birthday Cy Perkins

200px-Cy_PerkinsShortly after Joe McCarthy took over as Yankee manager following the 1930 season, the Philadelphia A’s put their long-time catcher, Cy Perkins on waivers. Seeing an opportunity to take ownership of Perkins’ years of experience as one of the American League’s best defensive catchers, Marse Joe told the Yankee front office to claim the native of Gloucester, Massachusetts.

Perkins had been the A’s starting catcher for six seasons, from 1919 until 1924, which included some of the worst teams in the franchise’s history. In 1925, Mickey Cochrane took over as Philadelphia’s starter behind the plate and Perkins became his backup for the next six seasons, during which Philadelphia developed into the best team in the American League. Cochrane was born a great hitter but when he made his debut with Philadelphia, he was a horrible defensive catcher. It was Perkins who taught the future Hall-of-Famer how to catch and he proved to be an excellent teacher.

His real name was Ralph Foster Perkins which makes me wonder how in the hell he came to be known as “Cy.” He was a pretty good hitter himself, averaging right around .270 during his starting days with the A’s and usually driving in between 60 and 70 runs a year. When he got to the Yankees in 1931, Bill Dickey was firmly ensconced as the team’s number one catcher but just as McCarthy had hoped, Perkins became a huge asset on the Yankee bench. He knew the strengths and weaknesses of every hitter in the league and Dickey and the entire Yankee pitching staff took full advantage of his expert advice. New York’s staff gave gave up 138 fewer runs than they surrendered in 1930 and some of the credit for that improvement had to go to their new third-string catcher.

With both Dickey and Arndt Jorgens in front of him on the depth chart, Perkins didn’t get much of a chance to actually catch during his only season as a Yankee player. He appeared in just 16 games during the ’31 season, collecting 12 hits with 7 RBIs and a .255 batting average. He then spent the next two seasons as a Yankee coach, joining the legendary Art Fletcher to provide McCarthy with a dynamic duo of baseball brainpower that would help him direct New York to a World Championship in 1932. After two seasons of coaching for the Yankees, he rejoined his former student Cochrane, who had become the player-manager of the Detroit Tigers. That Tiger ball club then went to two straight World Series and won the 1935 Fall Classic. Perkins died in 1963 at the age of 67.

He shares his birthday with another Yankee catcher, this former Yankee reliever and this other former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1931 NYY 16 49 47 3 12 1 0 0 7 0 1 4 .255 .286 .277 .562
17 Yrs 1171 4022 3604 329 933 175 35 30 409 18 301 221 .259 .319 .352 .670
PHA (15 yrs) 1154 3972 3556 326 921 174 35 30 402 18 300 217 .259 .319 .353 .672
NYY (1 yr) 16 49 47 3 12 1 0 0 7 0 1 4 .255 .286 .277 .562
DET (1 yr) 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/2/2014.

February 27 – Happy Birthday Willie Banks

I was watching a well-done sports documentary about Bob Hurley Sr. on ESPN this past weekend when the name and image of Willie Banks appeared on my television screen. Hurley is the legendary high school basketball coach at St Anthony’s High School in Jersey City New Jersey. You can add up all the World Series won by Miller Huggins, Joe McCarthy, Casey Stengel and Joe Torre and the total doesn’t exceed the number of New Jersey State Basketball Championships St. Anthony’s has won since Hurley became coach of the program. All of his players graduate, most go to college, a bunch get full rides to do so and quite a few, like Hurley’s own son Bobby Jr. make it to the NBA.

Today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant graduated from St. Anthony’s and played basketball for Hurley Sr. on the same team Bobby Jr played. But basketball was Willie Banks’ second best game. He also played baseball and when he was a student athlete at St Tony’s, Banks’ right arm could already throw a baseball from the pitchers mound to home plate at speeds over ninety miles per hour. In 1987 he became the highest ever draft pick for a New Jersey high school-er when he was selected in the first round (third pick overall) of the 1987 MLB Amateur Draft by the Minnesota Twins. He made the big leagues for the first time in 1991 and in January of 1997 he signed a minor league contract to pitch for the Yankee organization. He spent most of that season in Columbus where he was used primarily as a starter and went 14-5. In September, with the Yankees close to clinching the AL Wild Card spot, Banks was called up to the big leagues and pitched brilliantly, finishing with a 3-0 record and a 1.93 ERA. That strong performance earned him a spot in New York’s bullpen to open the ’98 season. Unfortunately for Banks, he was not able to begin his second season in the Big Apple as effectively as he had finished his first and with an ERA of over ten, he was traded to the Diamondbacks that June for two guys I’ve still never heard of.

Banks kept pitching both in the Majors and minors until 2005 and then stopped when his Mom passed away. She had raised Willie and his brothers by herself in the toughest projects in Jersey City. Banks was extremely close to her and went into a deep depression upon her death. He credits his former Yankee teammate, Tim “Rock” Raines with giving him a reason to live again. Raines was managing the Newark Bears in 2009 and he convinced Banks to come pitch for the team. Willie spent the next two years doing so, finally retiring in 2010 at the age of 41. His big league career record ended up at 33-39 with 2 saves and a 4.58 ERA. By the way, if you get a chance to see that ESPN special about St. Anthony’s, I recommend it highly.

Banks shares his February 27th birthday with another one-time Yankee reliever, this former catcher/coach and this former Yankee back-up catcher.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1997 NYY 3 0 1.000 1.93 5 1 1 0 0 0 14.0 9 3 3 0 6 8 1.071
1998 NYY 1 1 .500 10.05 9 0 5 0 0 0 14.1 20 16 16 4 12 8 2.233
9 Yrs 33 39 .458 4.75 181 84 40 1 1 2 610.1 632 370 322 65 302 428 1.530
MIN (3 yrs) 16 17 .485 4.61 52 45 5 0 0 0 259.2 287 152 133 24 127 191 1.594
BOS (2 yrs) 2 1 .667 2.72 34 0 19 0 0 1 49.2 37 19 15 5 18 36 1.107
CHC (2 yrs) 8 13 .381 6.18 33 23 2 1 1 0 150.0 166 111 103 21 68 100 1.560
NYY (2 yrs) 4 1 .800 6.04 14 1 6 0 0 0 28.1 29 19 19 4 18 16 1.659
ARI (1 yr) 1 2 .333 3.09 33 0 8 0 0 1 43.2 34 21 15 2 25 32 1.351
LAD (1 yr) 0 2 .000 4.03 6 6 0 0 0 0 29.0 36 21 13 2 16 23 1.793
FLA (1 yr) 2 3 .400 4.32 9 9 0 0 0 0 50.0 43 27 24 7 30 30 1.460
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 3/2/2014.