Results tagged ‘ december 3 ’

December 3 – Happy Birthday Butch Wensloff

wensloffGrowing up in Sausalito, California, Charles “Butch” Wensloff did not have an easy life. He was just six years old and the eldest of three children, when his dad left his mom to marry another woman. In an effort to help his family put food on the table during the Great Depression, Charley quit school at a young age to work at a variety of odd jobs.

In his spare time he pitched for semi-pro teams. Strong as a bull, the young right-hander had an impressive fastball and to keep opposing hitters off balance, he developed a very good knuckler. His mastery of those two pitches got him his first minor league contract in 1937 with the El Paso Texans, a D-level club in the old Aztec League. His 17-10 record that season caught the attention of the Yankees and they purchased his contract and moved him up to their Joplin affiliate in the C-level Western Association. When Wensloff won 21 games during his second year in Joplin, he was sent up to the Yankees double A affiliate in Kansas City, where during the next three seasons he won 49 ball games.

The Yankees finally brought him up in 1943, when he was 27 years old. Manager Joe McCarthy loved the fact that in addition to a fastball and curve, his new rookie hurler had better than average command of his knuckleball. The Yankee skipper wasted little time throwing Wensloff into the starting rotation and by the end of his first year in the big leagues, he had compiled a 13-11 record and a 2.58 ERA.

He didn’t get to throw a single pitch in the Yankees five-game victory over the Cardinals in the ’43 Series because McCarthy had decided to use him as his long reliever out of the bullpen if the need arose. It never did.

Wensloff was one of those guys who never felt as if he was being paid enough and for all I know, he probably had good reasons for feeling that way. When he received his proposed Yankee contract for the 1944 season in the mail, he was unhappy with it and refused to sign it. When the stalemate continued, he was put on the voluntarily retired list and missed the entire 1944 season. He then got drafted into the Army in 1945 and wasn’t discharged until August of 1946, long after all of the Yankees other pitchers had returned from service. The long period of inactivity and his late discharge probably contributed to the sore arm he developed during the Yankees’ 1947 spring training camp.

Though he did finally return to pitch for New York again in June of that year, his arm was never the same. After going 3-1 for Bucky Harris’s 1947 AL Pennant winners he finally got to pitch in a World Series that fall. But when he again was unhappy with the Yankees contract offer for the following season, he asked to be traded. His wish was granted when he was dealt to the Indians but after just one painful appearance with Cleveland, his big league career was over. He passed away in 2001, at the age of 85.

He shares his December 3rd birthday with this former Yankee first baseman, this former Yankee pitcher and this one-time Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1943 NYY 13 11 .542 2.54 29 27 1 18 1 1 223.1 179 80 63 7 70 105 1.115
1947 NYY 3 1 .750 2.61 11 5 3 1 0 0 51.2 41 17 15 3 22 18 1.219
3 Yrs 16 13 .552 2.60 41 32 5 19 1 1 276.2 222 99 80 11 95 125 1.146
NYY (2 yrs) 16 12 .571 2.55 40 32 4 19 1 1 275.0 220 97 78 10 92 123 1.135
CLE (1 yr) 0 1 .000 10.80 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.2 2 2 2 1 3 2 3.000
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/3/2013.

December 3 – Happy Birthday Gene Nelson

nelsonYankee fans will need a long and good memory to remember when today’s birthday celebrant played in pinstripes. In fact, many of you may have a tough time remembering Gene Nelson at all, even though he was a very steady big league reliever for a dozen seasons with Seattle, the White Sox and Oakland, retiring after the 1993 season. But before Nelson went to the bullpen, he was a 20-year-old Yankee starting pitcher prospect, who found himself inserted into Gene Michael’s starting rotation in May of the Yankee’s strike-split 1981 season. He did better than OK. In seven starts, he won three of his four decisions, including a strong eight and a third inning effort against the Orioles on June 4th that would prove to be his last victory as a Yankee. One week later, Major League Baseball players went on strike.

When the work stoppage ended seven weeks later, Nelson was still a Yankee but Bob Lemon had replaced Michael as Yankee manager and the relationships between MLB owners and the players had been severely damaged. Lemon left his young right-hander off the Yankees’ postseason roster that year and just before the 1982 season got under way, the Yankees traded Nelson to the Mariners in the deal that brought starting pitcher Shane Rawley to the Bronx.

Nelson was born in Tampa, FL. His lifetime big league won-loss record was 53-64 and he had 28 career saves. The highlight of his career was the 1988 ALCS, when he got two of Oakland’s three victories, as the A’s beat Boston in four games. He also won a ring with Oakland in 1988.

He shares his December 3rd birthday with this former Yankee first baseman, this WWII era pitcher and this one-time Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1981 NYY 3 1 .750 4.81 8 7 0 0 0 0 39.1 40 24 21 5 23 16 1.602
13 Yrs 53 64 .453 4.13 493 68 153 6 1 28 1080.0 1061 537 496 117 418 655 1.369
OAK (6 yrs) 25 25 .500 3.82 281 9 86 0 0 14 490.1 456 222 208 48 165 315 1.266
CHW (3 yrs) 19 21 .475 4.16 120 28 41 3 0 9 335.0 334 164 155 39 125 207 1.370
SEA (2 yrs) 6 12 .333 5.30 32 24 4 3 1 0 154.2 171 99 91 22 81 82 1.629
TEX (1 yr) 0 0 3.38 6 0 2 0 0 1 8.0 10 3 3 0 1 4 1.375
CAL (1 yr) 0 5 .000 3.08 46 0 20 0 0 4 52.2 50 25 18 3 23 31 1.386
NYY (1 yr) 3 1 .750 4.81 8 7 0 0 0 0 39.1 40 24 21 5 23 16 1.602
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/3/2013.

December 3 – Happy Birthday Joe Collins

By 1949, Joe Collins had been in the Yankee farm system for eleven years, starting as a sixteen year old with the Easton (Maryland) Yankees in the old D-level Eastern Shore League. During his last three seasons in the minors, the Scranton, PA native had torn up the pitching at the triple A level and was more than ready to play in the Majors. The problem was that Casey Stengel’s 1949 Yankees had more first baseman than some teams had pitchers. They included Tommy Henrich, Johnny Mize, Billy Jones, Fenton Mole, Jack Phillips and Dick Kryhoski. But Collins had averaged 25 home runs during his last three Minor League seasons and by 1950, the Yankee brass decided the then 26-year-old prospect needed a shot at the big leagues. Joe then became the team’s most frequently used first baseman until Moose Skowren took over the position in 1955. When that happened, Stengel continued to use Collins as an outfielder for two seasons until the New York front office sold him to the Philadelphia Athletics. Collins chose to retire rather than play in a uniform other than the Yankee pinstripes, ending the career of one of the classiest Yankees ever.  Collins’ Yankee teams got into eight World Series, winning five of them. He never displayed as much power as he showed at the Minor League level during his Major League career but he did hit 18 home runs during the the 1952 season and 17 more in 1953. Collins, who was born in 1922, passed away in 1989.

Collins shares his December 3rd birthday with this former Yankee teammatethis one-time Yankee starting pitcher and this one too.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1948 NYY 5 5 5 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 .200 .200 .400 .600
1949 NYY 7 16 10 2 1 0 0 0 4 0 6 2 .100 .438 .100 .538
1950 NYY 108 238 205 47 48 8 3 8 28 5 31 34 .234 .335 .420 .754
1951 NYY 125 299 262 52 75 8 5 9 48 9 34 23 .286 .368 .458 .826
1952 NYY 122 489 428 69 120 16 8 18 59 4 55 47 .280 .364 .481 .845
1953 NYY 127 450 387 72 104 11 2 17 44 2 59 36 .269 .365 .439 .805
1954 NYY 130 399 343 67 93 20 2 12 46 2 51 37 .271 .365 .446 .812
1955 NYY 105 330 278 40 65 9 1 13 45 0 44 32 .234 .339 .414 .753
1956 NYY 100 303 262 38 59 5 3 7 43 3 34 33 .225 .313 .347 .661
1957 NYY 79 174 149 17 30 1 0 2 10 2 24 18 .201 .310 .248 .559
10 Yrs 908 2703 2329 404 596 79 24 86 329 27 338 263 .256 .350 .421 .771
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/3/2013.

December 3 – Happy Birthday Harry Simpson

It was a pinstripe birthday celebration that made today’s Pinstripe Birthday Blog posting possible. On May 16, 1957, Yankee second baseman, Billy Martin turned 29-years-old. A bunch of Yankees went out on the town that evening to celebrate with their fiery teammate and they ended up at the late show of Manhattan’s Copacabana Nightclub. That’s where Martin and his pals got into a brawl in the famous nightspot’s men’s room and when it was over, a supposedly belligerent patron was on his way to the hospital and Martin was on his way out of his beloved Yankee uniform. New York’s ultra conservative GM, George Weiss had enough of Martin’s continuous forays into controversial events and in July of that season, he sent the future Yankee manager to Kansas City as part of a seven player transaction that netted New York reliever Ryne Duren and outfielder Harry Simpson. Harry was coming off the best year of his career in 1955, when he hit 21 home runs, drove in 105, led the league in triples and made his one and only AL All Star team. But he was joining a Yankee team that was loaded with good outfielders and the reduced playing time was not helpful to Simpson’s rhythm at the plate. When the Atlanta, Georgia native hit just .083 during New York’s seven-game loss to the Braves in that year’s World Series, Harry’s days in the Bronx were numbered. Exactly one year to the day he was acquired from the A’s, Weiss traded Simpson back to Kansas City. He was then traded three more times in the next year earning him the nickname “Suitcase.” He played his last big league ball game in September of 1959. He passed away in 1979, when he was just 53 years old.

Also born on this date is this Yankee first baseman who started at that position for New York during the first half of the 1950s. This one-time Yankee starting pitcher and this one too also share Simpson’s birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1957 NYY 75 247 224 27 56 7 3 7 39 1 19 36 .250 .307 .402 .709
1958 NYY 24 58 51 1 11 2 1 0 6 0 6 12 .216 .310 .294 .604
8 Yrs 888 3138 2829 343 752 101 41 73 381 17 271 429 .266 .331 .408 .739
KCA (5 yrs) 389 1483 1344 164 391 54 25 40 210 5 121 208 .291 .349 .458 .806
CLE (4 yrs) 353 1256 1120 143 276 31 11 24 111 11 121 157 .246 .323 .358 .681
NYY (2 yrs) 99 305 275 28 67 9 4 7 45 1 25 48 .244 .308 .382 .690
PIT (1 yr) 9 15 15 3 4 2 0 0 2 0 0 2 .267 .267 .400 .667
CHW (1 yr) 38 79 75 5 14 5 1 2 13 0 4 14 .187 .228 .360 .588
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/3/2013.