Results tagged ‘ catcher ’

November 19 – Happy Birthday Joe Glenn

GlennJoe Glenn took the Yankees second string catcher’s job away from longtime Bill Dickey understudy, Arndt Jorgens in 1937, by being much more aggressive than his Norwegian-born predecessor both behind and at the plate. Though the Dickson City, PA native had little power, he was a tough bird who was known for not backing down from any pitcher or opposing base runner.

His Yankee career started with two brief call-ups from the minors in 1932 and 33. He was then called up to stay in 1935 and gave Manager Joe McCarthy three solid seasons as Dickey’s backup. He was also Lou Gehrig’s frequent roommate on Yankee road trips and he holds the unusual distinction of catching the last games pitched by both Babe Ruth and Ted Williams.

After their 1938 World Series victory, New York traded Glenn and outfielder Myril Hoag to the Browns for pitcher Oral Hildebrand and outfielder Buster Mills. Nicknamed Gabby, Glenn spent a year with the Browns and one final big league season with the Red Sox in 1940, before becoming a minor league manager in the Cubs organization.

He shares his birthday with this long-ago Yankee shortstop.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1932 NYY 6 18 16 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 .125 .222 .125 .347
1933 NYY 5 21 21 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 .143 .143 .143 .286
1935 NYY 17 49 43 7 10 4 0 0 6 0 4 1 .233 .298 .326 .623
1936 NYY 44 150 129 21 35 7 0 1 20 1 20 10 .271 .373 .349 .722
1937 NYY 25 64 53 6 15 2 2 0 4 0 10 11 .283 .397 .396 .793
1938 NYY 41 133 123 10 32 7 2 0 25 1 10 14 .260 .316 .350 .665
8 Yrs 248 808 718 77 181 34 5 5 89 6 81 91 .252 .330 .334 .664
NYY (6 yrs) 138 435 385 45 97 20 4 1 56 2 45 44 .252 .333 .332 .666
BOS (1 yr) 22 53 47 3 6 1 0 0 4 0 5 7 .128 .212 .149 .360
SLB (1 yr) 88 320 286 29 78 13 1 4 29 4 31 40 .273 .344 .367 .711
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/19/2013.

October 21 – Happy Birthday John Flaherty

Flash.FlahertyFlash turns 46 years old today. Before he joined the YES Network as an analyst for Yankee games and as a commentator on the Post Game shows, Flaherty was a big league catcher for fourteen seasons with five different teams. Born in the Big Apple, he ended that playing career in his hometown, with three seasons as Jorge Posada’s backup from 2003 until 2005. During lulls in the action, when he is in the booth for Yankee games, viewers often hear Michael Kay or Kenny Singleton tease Flaherty about the lucrative contract he signed with Tampa Bay, back in 1998. He pocketed about $12 million of Devil Ray money during his five season stay for catching about 90 games per year and averaging .252. He hit just .226 during his 134-game career in pinstripes but he’s doing a much better job for New York in his broadcasting role.

In 2011, Flaherty became an owner of a professional baseball team, when he founded the Rockland Boulders, a member of the unaffiliated Canadian-American League. The team is based in Rockland County, NY.

Like Flaherty, this Yankee was born in New York City and celebrates his birthday on this date. He did a bit better than John did while playing in New York and now has a plaque in Cooperstown. Also born on October 21st is this former Yankee pitcher who flirted with World Series history in 1947.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2003 NYY 40 116 105 16 28 8 0 4 14 0 4 19 .267 .297 .457 .754
2004 NYY 47 135 127 11 32 9 0 6 16 0 5 25 .252 .286 .465 .750
2005 NYY 47 138 127 10 21 5 0 2 11 0 6 26 .165 .206 .252 .458
14 Yrs 1047 3640 3372 319 849 176 3 80 395 10 175 514 .252 .290 .377 .667
TBD (5 yrs) 471 1802 1673 157 422 82 1 35 196 3 86 250 .252 .289 .365 .654
NYY (3 yrs) 134 389 359 37 81 22 0 12 41 0 15 70 .226 .261 .387 .648
DET (3 yrs) 193 594 546 59 130 35 1 15 67 1 27 83 .238 .277 .388 .665
BOS (2 yrs) 48 100 91 6 16 4 0 0 4 0 5 13 .176 .224 .220 .444
SDP (2 yrs) 201 755 703 60 200 33 1 18 87 6 42 98 .284 .324 .411 .736
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/21/2013.

October 13 – Happy Birthday Walter Blair

blairWalter Blair was a back-up catcher for the New York Highlanders during the first decade of the team’s existence. After playing college ball at Bucknell and spending a couple of seasons in the minors, New York signed him in 1907 to back up their starting receiver at the time, Red Kleinow. By then, the native of Landrus, Pennsylvania was 23-years-old and had developed solid defensive skills behind the plate and a sharp mind for the game. His problem was he couldn’t hit.

It was his offensive inabilities that doomed his one attempt at becoming New York’s starting catcher. In 1911, then manager, Hal Chase pretty much alternated Blair and 22-year-old Jeff Sweeney behind the plate the entire season. Sweeney hit just .231 and still outhit Blair by close to 40 points.

That performance ended Blair’s Highlander and big league career. He went back to the Minors for two seasons and then played in the upstart Federal League for a couple of more. He found he had a knack for helping young ballplayers develop their skills and got into  managing and even purchased an interest in a minor league team back in his home state of Pennsylvania. Then in 1917, he took over as the coach of the University of Pittsburgh’s baseball team. Three years later, he moved into the same position for his alma mater, Bucknell. He passed away in 1948 at the age of 64.

He shares his October 13th birthday with this former Yankee manager, this former Yankee backup catcher this former Yankee reliever and this former Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1907 NYY 7 24 22 1 4 0 0 0 1 0 2 5 .182 .250 .182 .432
1908 NYY 76 230 211 9 40 5 1 1 13 4 11 31 .190 .237 .237 .474
1909 NYY 42 121 110 5 23 2 2 0 11 2 7 17 .209 .269 .264 .533
1910 NYY 6 23 22 2 5 0 1 0 2 0 0 3 .227 .227 .318 .545
1911 NYY 85 254 222 18 43 9 2 0 26 2 16 24 .194 .257 .252 .510
NYY (5 yrs) 216 652 587 35 115 16 6 1 53 8 36 80 .196 .251 .249 .500
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/13/2013.

September 13 – Happy Birthday Pat Collins

pat.collinsLearned something interesting when researching for stuff I could use to write a post about today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant. The Yankees first started spending more money on player acquisition than any other team in baseball, back when Jacob Ruppert owned the team and employed Ed Barrow as the team’s de facto GM and Miller Huggins as field skipper.

Red Sox owner Harry Frazee became the first beneficiary (or should I say “victim”) of New York’s generosity, when he accepted lot’s of Yankee dollars for most of Boston’s starting pitching rotation, including a soon-to-be-ex-pitcher by the name of Ruth. Another team that saw a lot of Ruppert’s money come their way was the Saint Paul Saints, an American Association minor league team based in Minnesota’s capital city.

The two most notable players the Yankees got from the Saints were shortstop Mark Koenig and today’s birthday celebrant, catcher Pat Collins. A native of Sweet Springs, Missouri, Collins had been a big league backup catcher for the St. Louis Browns from 1919 through 1924, when he was released and signed with the Saints. He was not a good defensive receiver and was an exceptionally slow runner but his pretty decent hitting had kept him on the Browns roster for all that time.

Collins feasted on minor league pitching during the 1925 season, smacking 19 home runs and averaging .316. Meanwhile, during that same year, the Yankees had tried to replace their veteran backstop, Wally Schang with 26-year-old Benny Bengough. Neither Huggins or Barrow were pleased with Bengough’s offense so the Yankee GM gave the Saints $15,000 for Collins.

He did provide the offensive boost the Yankees hoped for during his two seasons as New York’s starting catcher, averaging right around .280 with an excellent on-base percentage. His problem remained defense and it was his poor overall glove work that convinced New York they needed to find his replacement. They gave Johnny Grabowski a shot at the job in 1928 and when he was injured in an off-season home fire, they went with a youngster named Bill Dickey who would remain a fixture behind the plate in Yankee Stadium for the next sixteen years.

Collins got sold to the Braves in December of 1928 and after appearing in just 11 games for Boston during the 1929 season, his big league career was over. He and his wife later operated a bar outside Kansas City and became owners of a minor league team. He was also convicted for evading about $4,000 worth of federal income tax in 1952. He died in 1960 at the age of 63.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot to mention the “something interesting” thing I learned when doing my research on Pat Collins. Ed Barrow would end up spending more than $300,000 purchasing players from that Saint Paul Saints minor league team and among them all, only Koenig and to a lesser extent, Collins ever made any significant contributions to the Yankees. The fact that the keen-eyed New York scouting organization could be so right about most of its signings and acquisitions and so frequently wrong when it came to deals made with the Saints sort of defied explanation. Or did it? Come to find out, one of the co-owners of that Saints franchise, who made lot’s of money from those transactions was none other than Yankee manager, Miller Huggins.

Collins shares his birthday with this former Yankee center-fielder, another former Yankee back-up catcher and this one-time Yankee starting pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1926 NYY 102 373 290 41 83 11 3 7 35 3 2 73 57 .286 .433 .417 .850
1927 NYY 92 311 251 38 69 9 3 7 36 0 1 54 24 .275 .407 .418 .825
1928 NYY 70 174 136 18 30 5 0 6 14 0 0 35 16 .221 .380 .390 .770
1929 BSN 7 11 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 1 .000 .375 .000 .375
10 Yrs 543 1474 1204 146 306 46 6 33 168 4 5 235 202 .254 .378 .385 .762
SLB (6 yrs) 272 605 522 48 124 21 0 13 81 1 2 70 104 .238 .328 .352 .680
NYY (3 yrs) 264 858 677 97 182 25 6 20 85 3 3 162 97 .269 .413 .412 .825
BSN (1 yr) 7 11 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 1 .000 .375 .000 .375
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/19/2013.

July 30 – Happy Birthday Gus Triandos

triandosGus Triandos passed through my hometown on his way to a very noteworthy big league career. He spent the 1950 season playing for the Amsterdam Rugmakers, the Yankees’ Class C affiliate in the old CanAm League. He hit an amazing .363 that season and impressed every baseball-lovng fan in Amsterdam with his shotgun arm and powerful swing. In fact, Triandos impressed fans in each of the seven Yankee minor league home towns he played in during his half-dozen season climb up the Yankee farm system, which was interrupted by two years of military service during the Korean War.

The only weakness Triandos had on a baseball field was his slowness afoot. Simply put, the guy was considered one of the slowest runners in Major League history. Despite that handicap, his strong hitting and outstanding defensive ability were clear indications that this native of San Francisco and son of Greek immigrants would some day be a starting catcher on a big league team. Blocking his path to that destiny with the Yankees was a guy named Yogi Berra.

The Yankees brought Triandos up a first time in mid-August of the 1953 season. Casey Stengel got the then 22-year-old prospect into 18 games down the stretch and he hit his first and only home run as a Yankee. But he averaged just .157 and when the season was over so was his Yankee career, pretty much. He spent almost the entire ’54 season with the Yanks’ Double A club in Birmingham and that November, was included in a historic 17-player transaction with the Orioles that brought Bob Turley and Don Larsen to the Yankees.

It was the big break Triandos’s career needed. He was actually the starting first baseman on the 1955 Baltimore team and Hal Smith started behind the plate. He took over the starting catcher’s job during the 1956 season and remained in that role for the next seven years. He quickly established his reputation as one of the league’s best all-around receivers. He made three straight AL All Star teams and his 30-home runs in 1958 tied Berra’s record for most HRs by a catcher in a season. Though he was still obscured by the Yankee great’s shadow, he became a huge fan favorite in Baltimore, where they named a street after him.

Triandos gained lots of notoriety and sympathy for having to catch Hoyt Wilhelm’s fluttering knuckleball during the Hall-of-Famer’s four-plus seasons as an Oriole. Baltimore manager, Paul Richards designed and had made an over-sized catcher’s mitt to assist Triandos with the task. Though Wilhelm had some of his best big league seasons pitching to Triandos, including his only no-hitter, big Gus often said that catching the hurler’s signature pitch was the worst part of his career.

In 1962, Triandos was traded to the Detroit Tigers and a year later, Detroit sent him and pitcher Jim Bunning to the Phillies. It was there that he caught his second career no-hitter, when Bunning accomplished the feat in June of 1964 against the Mets. But Triandos had stopped hitting during his final few seasons in Baltimore and never again regained his stroke. He retired after the 1965 season and returned to his native California, where he started a mail delivery business. He died in his sleep, from heart failure in March of 2013 at the age of 82. One of my favorite all-time TV shows was the HBO series “Wire,” which dramatized crime and corruption in the City of Baltimore. This story of how Triandos was immortalized in an episode of the show is must reading for fans of this great former Oriole.

Triandos shares his birthday with his former Yankee manager, this former Yankee first baseman and this one-time New York pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1953 NYY 18 55 51 5 8 2 0 1 6 0 3 9 .157 .204 .255 .459
1954 NYY 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .000 .000 .000 .000
13 Yrs 1206 4424 3907 389 954 147 6 167 608 1 440 636 .244 .322 .413 .735
BAL (8 yrs) 953 3610 3186 331 794 119 6 142 517 1 365 487 .249 .326 .424 .751
PHI (2 yrs) 103 311 270 20 61 11 0 8 37 0 35 58 .226 .314 .356 .669
NYY (2 yrs) 20 56 52 5 8 2 0 1 6 0 3 10 .154 .200 .250 .450
HOU (1 yr) 24 78 72 5 13 2 0 2 7 0 5 14 .181 .244 .292 .535
DET (1 yr) 106 369 327 28 78 13 0 14 41 0 32 67 .239 .315 .407 .722
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/29/2013.