Results tagged ‘ august 23 ’

August 23 – Happy Birthday Cedric Durst

durstIt was the greatest trade in Yankee history. Today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant was a utility outfielder on the great Murderers Row Yankee teams that won the 1927 and ’28 World Series. With a starting outfield of Babe Ruth, Earle Combs and Bob Meusel, Cedric Durst usually only saw action when the Babe was tired, sick or hung over. He was one of Yankee skipper, Miller Huggins’ spare parts, who had broken into the big leagues with the St. Louis Browns in 1922 and been traded to New York for pitcher, Sad Sam Jones five seasons later.

As each Yankee season passed, Durst saw his playing time increase. Its only natural that other teams in need of outfielders would be interested in looking at the one who backed up the greatest all-around player in the game. Unlike previous Red Sox-Yankee trades, no other teams cried “foul” when New York sent Durst to Boston for a 25-year-old pitcher named Red Ruffing, early in the second month of the 1930 regular season. Heck, I bet hardly anybody even noticed the deal.

At the time, Ruffing was just beginning his sixth season as a member of the Red Sox starting rotation and his lifetime record was an abysmal 39-96. That converts to a woeful .289 winning percentage and when you throw in the right hander’s career 4.61 ERA at the time of the trade, you can understand why when the Durst/Ruffing deal went down it got just a two-paragraph mention on the sports pages of the New York Times.

So all Ruffing does after switching his red hosiery for a pinstriped jersey is go 15-5 during the rest of that 1930 season and put together a 231-124 Hall of Fame career for the Bronx Bombers. When he retired, he was the winningest pitcher in Yankee franchise history. How did Durst do in Boston? Well, he did become a starter for the first time in his career, getting into 102 games for the Red Sox during the rest of that 1930 season. But he averaged just .245 and his on base percentage was only .290. Heck, during Ruffing’s last season in Beantown, the great hitting pitcher had averaged .364 and driven in six more runs than Durst did for the Red Sox in half as many games. Boston would have actually been better off keeping Ruffing and switching him to the outfield full time. Instead, they found themselves again on the losing end of one of the most lop-sided trades in history.

That 1930 season would be Durst’s only one as a Red Sox and the final season of his big league career. He went back to the minors in 1931 and continued playing baseball until  1943, when he was 46-years-old. He shares his birthday with baseball’s first-ever DH and this former Yankee catching prospect who became a big league All Star.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1927 NYY 65 142 129 18 32 4 3 0 25 0 6 7 .248 .281 .326 .607
1928 NYY 74 146 135 18 34 2 1 2 10 1 7 9 .252 .289 .326 .615
1929 NYY 92 223 202 32 52 3 3 4 31 3 15 25 .257 .309 .361 .670
1930 NYY 8 19 19 0 3 1 0 0 5 0 0 1 .158 .158 .211 .368
7 Yrs 481 1220 1103 145 269 39 17 15 124 7 75 100 .244 .294 .351 .645
NYY (4 yrs) 239 530 485 68 121 10 7 6 71 4 28 42 .249 .290 .336 .627
SLB (3 yrs) 140 360 316 48 74 10 5 8 29 0 30 34 .234 .303 .373 .676
BOS (1 yr) 102 330 302 29 74 19 5 1 24 3 17 24 .245 .290 .351 .641
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/23/2013.

August 23 – Happy Birthday Sherm Lollar

Today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant’s career initially suffered from poor timing. He started out as a catcher in the Cleveland organization right about the time the Indians’ Jim Hegan was just beginning to establish himself as one of the best defensive receivers ever. When he was brought up to the parent club in 1946, he begged management to send him back down instead of letting him rot on the bench. Instead, that December, the Cleveland front office traded the right-hand hitting Lollar to the Yankees.

Poor timing again. The Yankee organization and big league roster were both loaded with promising catchers. In 1947, they included Aaron Robinson, Ralph Houk, Ken Sylvestri  and a young left-handed receiver named Yogi Berra. Lollar was sent to New York’s Newark farm team and he had a solid year with the Bears. The Yankees decided to give him a look-see late that season and ended up keeping him on their postseason roster. When Lollar got into two World Series games that year against Brooklyn and went 3-for-4 at the plate, his standing in the organization went up dramatically.

But the following year, the Yankees added the right-hand hitting Gus Niarhos to their big league roster and skipper Bucky Harris began platooning him and Berra behind the plate while Lollar again sat the pine. He got into just 22 games that season while Berra, who played the outfield when he wasn’t catching, had a breakout season at the plate, hitting .305 and driving in 98 runs. That’s when the timing in Lollar’s career went from bad to good. That October, the Yankees replaced Harris as Yankee manager with Casey Stengel.  Though the Ol’ Perfessor would establish a legacy as the master of platooning, he would soon ignore that strategy when it came to Berra, and Yogi would go on  to catch close to 1,700 games as a Yankee. Two months after Stengel got his pinstripes, Lollar lost his when he was traded to the Browns. In St. Louis, he finally got a chance to play regularly and quickly began to realize his potential. But after just three years there, Lollar was again traded, this time to the Chicago White Sox. It would be in the Windy City where this native of Durham, Arkansas would establish his legacy as one of baseball’s best catchers. He played a dozen seasons for the White Sox, and during the first nine of them, the team never finished below third in the AL Pennant race. Lollar’s career year was 1959, when his 22 home runs and 84 RBIs led Chicago to that year’s World Series, which they lost to the Dodgers.

Lollar would continue playing for Chicago until 1963, when he retired with 155 career home runs and a .264 lifetime batting average. He died suddenly from a heart attack in 1977, when he was just 56-years-old. In his NY Times obituary, the White Sox GM who traded for Lollar, the legendary Frank Lane was quoted as saying that trade was the best one he ever made. As Lane went on to explain, “Sherm turned out to be one of the best catchers in the American League behind only Yogi Berra and maybe Jim Hegan.” Some things never change.

Lollar shares his August 23rd birthday with this MLB’s first-ever DH and this outfielder who was traded by the Yanks for Red Ruffing.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1947 NYY 11 33 32 4 7 0 1 1 6 0 1 5 .219 .242 .375 .617
1948 NYY 22 39 38 0 8 0 0 0 4 0 1 6 .211 .231 .211 .441
18 Yrs 1752 6220 5351 623 1415 244 14 155 808 20 671 453 .264 .357 .402 .759
CHW (12 yrs) 1358 4924 4229 485 1122 186 9 124 631 17 525 360 .265 .358 .402 .759
SLB (3 yrs) 333 1154 990 127 263 52 4 29 158 3 139 73 .266 .364 .414 .778
NYY (2 yrs) 33 72 70 4 15 0 1 1 10 0 2 11 .214 .236 .286 .522
CLE (1 yr) 28 70 62 7 15 6 0 1 9 0 5 9 .242 .299 .387 .686
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/23/2013.

August 23 – Happy Birthday Ron Blomberg

On April 6, 1973, Ron Blomberg came to the plate in the top of the first inning at Fenway Park with two outs and bases loaded during that year’s Yankee season opener and he was walked by the Red Sox’ Luis Tiant. “Boomer” thus became the very first designated hitter in Major League history. Blomberg, who was born on this date in 1948 in Atlanta, GA, might have been in the Hall of Fame today if there were no left handed pitchers in baseball. He hit over .300 against righties during his eight-year big league career and just .215 against southpaws. Unfortunately, a string of injuries limited him to one game of action during the Yankee’s 1976 AL Championship year and he was released by New York the following season.

On his Website, RonBlomberg.com, Boomer informs visitors that it was his boyhood dream to play baseball for the New York Yankees. He certainly had lot’s of options back then. According to his Wikipedia article, Blomberg is the only high school athlete ever selected to Parade Magazine’s High School All American Teams for the sports of baseball, football and basketball. When he graduated from high school in 1967, the Yankees made him their number 1 draft choice. Two years later, he was in the Bronx wearing pinstripes.

A dependable clutch hitter, I’ll always be convinced that Boomer would have been a key cog in the Yankee championship teams of the late seventies if he could have stayed healthy. He had a great eye at the plate and he didn’t strike out a lot. Being such a great athlete, you have to believe that given the opportunity, this guy could have learned to hit left-handers.

But Boomer just couldn’t stay off the DL. He had the knees of Mickey Mantle with chronically sore shoulders thrown in for good measure. Still, after the Yankees released him, he was able to secure a three-year , half-million dollar deal with the White Sox. His final big league season was 1978.

Blomberg shares his August 23rd birthday with this one-time Yankee catcher and the outfielder the Yanks traded to get Red Ruffing.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1969 NYY 4 7 6 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 .500 .571 .500 1.071
1971 NYY 64 216 199 30 64 6 2 7 31 2 14 23 .322 .363 .477 .840
1972 NYY 107 341 299 36 80 22 1 14 49 0 38 26 .268 .355 .488 .843
1973 NYY 100 338 301 45 99 13 1 12 57 2 34 25 .329 .395 .498 .893
1974 NYY 90 301 264 39 82 11 2 10 48 2 29 33 .311 .375 .481 .856
1975 NYY 34 119 106 18 27 8 2 4 17 0 13 10 .255 .336 .481 .817
1976 NYY 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
8 Yrs 461 1493 1333 184 391 67 8 52 224 6 140 134 .293 .360 .473 .832
NYY (7 yrs) 400 1324 1177 168 355 60 8 47 202 6 129 117 .302 .370 .486 .856
CHW (1 yr) 61 169 156 16 36 7 0 5 22 0 11 17 .231 .280 .372 .652
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/23/2013.