Results tagged ‘ august 22 ’

August 22 – Happy Birthday David Huff

huffWhat a birthday present today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant gave himself, his teammates and Yankee fans last evening at the Stadium. David Huff turns 29-years-old today and last night Joe Girardi called on him to relieve spot starter Adam Warren in the fourth inning of New York’s game against Toronto. All he did was huff and puff and close the Blue Jays offense down for five innings allowing the Yankee offense to rally and win the game. I got to admit, I wondered why New York put this left-handed reliever on their roster earlier this month and even wondered why Girardi went to him in that game last night, but I’m not wondering any more.

Originally a first round draft pick of the Cleveland Indians in 2006, Huff went 11-9 during his 2009 rookie season with the Tribe but his ERA that year was too high at 5.61. It got even higher in his sophomore year, climbing to 6.21 and this time he paid for it with an abysmal 2-11 record. Cleveland kept him around in their organization for three more years, before giving up on the native of San Diego and placing him on waivers earlier this season.

The Yankees grabbed him and sent him to their triple A team in Scranton/Wilkes Barre. He didn’t pitch very well there, going 1-6 with an ERA just under four so no one was probably more surprised than Huff himself when he was told he was headed to the Bronx.. In fact, that conversation never would have taken place if Dellin Betances, one of the original Killer B’s, who was called just before Huff had not been abused in his only appearance against the Angels. When the Yanks sent Betances back down they replaced him with Huff,

Truth is that its way too early to tell if Huff can stick in the Yankee bullpen for the rest of this season, but if he can put together a few more outings like the one he had last night against the Jays, he won’t be going anywhere for at least a while. Huff shares his birthday with this former Yankee catcher and this former starting pitcher.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2013 NYY 0 0 6.75 2 0 2 0 0 0 1.1 1 1 1 0 2 1 2.250
5 Yrs 18 26 .409 5.41 60 52 4 1 0 0 289.2 353 198 174 41 100 163 1.564
CLE (5 yrs) 18 26 .409 5.40 58 52 2 1 0 0 288.1 352 197 173 41 98 162 1.561
NYY (1 yr) 0 0 6.75 2 0 2 0 0 0 1.1 1 1 1 0 2 1 2.250
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/22/2013.

August 22 – Happy Birthday Wally Schang

Wally Schang was one of baseball’s premier catchers for close to two decades beginning in 1913 and he was also the first of the long line of star players who started behind the plate for baseball’s most successful franchise. The son of a western New York State farmer, he signed with Connie Mack’s Philadelphia A’s team in 1913, when the club was in the middle of its first dynasty. He won his first World Series ring in his rookie season and then became the team’s starting catcher the following year. In 1915, he set a big league record by throwing out six would-be base stealers in a single game. A switch-hitter, in 1916 he became the first player in history to hit home runs from both sides of the plate in the same game. In addition to great defensive skills and above-average power, Schang had an outstanding batting eye. During his 19 seasons in the big leagues he averaged .284 lifetime but his career on-base percentage was a hefty .393.

In 1918, Mack made a trade with the Red Sox that sent Schang to Boston just in time to win his second World Series ring. He would spend three total seasons as starting catcher in Beantown before following his Red Sox batterymate, Babe Ruth to the Yankees in 1921.

Again blessed with good timing, Schang was Miller Huggins’ starting catcher on the 1921, ’22 and ’23 AL Pennant winners and won his third World Series ring on that 1923 Yankee squad, the first World Championship team in franchise history.

During his five seasons as New York’s signal-caller, Schang hit .297 and threw out just less than half the runners who attempted to steal against him. He hit .316 during his first season in pinstripes and .319 in his second. By the 1925 season, he had reached 35 years of age and was losing playing time to the younger Benny Benough. Just before the 1926 Yankee spring training camp opened, New York traded Schang to the Browns for pitcher George Mogridge and cash.

Determined to prove he could still play the game, Schang hit .330 during his first season in St. Louis and caught there for an additional three seasons. His last big league season was 1931 with Detroit, when he was 41 years-old. The depression made it impossible for him to return to  farming, so he kept playing and then coaching in the minor leagues. As one of the Game’s best catchers of his era, Schang deserved a lot more attention in Hall-of-Fame voting than he ever received. He died in 1965 at the age of 75.

Schang shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this current Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1921 NYY 134 516 424 77 134 30 5 6 55 7 78 35 .316 .428 .453 .881
1922 NYY 124 492 408 46 130 21 7 1 53 12 53 36 .319 .405 .412 .816
1923 NYY 84 315 272 39 75 8 2 2 29 5 27 17 .276 .360 .342 .702
1924 NYY 114 421 356 46 104 19 7 5 52 2 48 43 .292 .382 .427 .809
1925 NYY 73 191 167 17 40 8 1 2 24 2 17 9 .240 .310 .335 .645
19 Yrs 1842 6431 5307 769 1506 264 90 59 711 121 849 573 .284 .393 .401 .794
PHA (6 yrs) 575 1943 1619 238 428 69 40 18 202 49 216 207 .264 .369 .390 .759
NYY (5 yrs) 529 1935 1627 225 483 86 22 16 213 28 223 140 .297 .390 .406 .796
SLB (4 yrs) 385 1302 1043 160 307 54 17 21 168 17 215 101 .294 .423 .439 .862
BOS (3 yrs) 323 1160 942 137 274 53 11 4 126 26 181 114 .291 .412 .383 .796
DET (1 yr) 30 91 76 9 14 2 0 0 2 1 14 11 .184 .311 .211 .522
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/22/2013.

August 22 – Happy Birthday Jeff Weaver

I was a Ted Lilly fan back when the left-hander was a young Yankee trying to become part of New York’s starting rotation in 2001 and the beginning of  ’02. Then, right around the 2002 All Star break, the Yankees made a complicated and confusing three team trade involving the Oakland A’s and Detroit Tigers. When it was over, Lilly was no longer a Yankee and the flaky Jeff “Dream” Weaver was. All of baseball loved Weaver’s stuff during his three-plus year stay in Motown, but he pitched poorly as a starter in Pinstripes, forcing Joe Torre to use him in the bullpen. After posting a 7-9 record and a 5.99 ERA in 2003, the Yankees sent Weaver to the Dodgers for the infamous Kevin Brown. He won 25 games for LA in 2004 and ’05 and then joined Angels as a free agent in 2006. The Angels than traded Weaver to the Cardinals just before the 2006 All Star break to make room on their roster for Jeff’s younger brother Jered. The deal worked out OK for both siblings because Jeff went onto help the Cardinals win the 2006 World Series and Jered has become the ace of the Angels staff.

In ’07, Jeff signed with Seattle but pitched poorly that year and ended up back in the minors in 2008. Weaver, who was born on August 22, 1976 in Northridge CA, then rejoined the Dodgers and Joe Torre in Los Angeles the following season. He has not pitched in the big leagues since 2010. Ted Lilly, who now also pitches for the Dodgers, went on to achieve double-digit victory totals for nine straight seasons after being dealt by New York.

Weaver shares his birthday with the starting catcher on the Yankees’ very first World Championship team and this current Yankee reliever.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO HBP WHIP
2002 NYY 5 3 .625 4.04 15 8 3 0 0 2 78.0 81 38 35 12 15 57 3 1.231
2003 NYY 7 9 .438 5.99 32 24 3 0 0 0 159.1 211 113 106 16 47 93 11 1.619
11 Yrs 104 119 .466 4.71 355 274 21 16 7 2 1838.0 1997 1023 961 227 516 1214 124 1.367
LAD (4 yrs) 38 29 .567 4.20 139 75 14 3 2 0 567.1 574 278 265 66 163 400 38 1.299
DET (4 yrs) 39 51 .433 4.33 111 109 1 10 3 0 714.2 728 372 344 76 209 477 54 1.311
NYY (2 yrs) 12 12 .500 5.35 47 32 6 0 0 2 237.1 292 151 141 28 62 150 14 1.492
STL (1 yr) 5 4 .556 5.18 15 15 0 0 0 0 83.1 99 49 48 16 26 45 6 1.500
LAA (1 yr) 3 10 .231 6.29 16 16 0 0 0 0 88.2 114 68 62 18 21 62 4 1.523
SEA (1 yr) 7 13 .350 6.20 27 27 0 3 2 0 146.2 190 105 101 23 35 80 8 1.534
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/22/2013.