Results tagged ‘ august 20 ’

August 20 – Happy Birthday Pete Schneider

schneiderThere were no “Joba Rules” when today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant made his big league debut as an 18-year-old right-handed pitcher for the 1914 Cincinnati Reds. The team he joined at such a young age was horrible, finishing dead last in the National League, with a 60-94 record. Though Pete Schneider could only manage a 5-13 record that season, his 2.81 rookie year ERA was a better indicator of just how talented and advanced this Los Angeles native was on a pitching mound. During the next three seasons, he averaged close to 300 innings pitched per year and achieved an overall ERA of 2,40. Unfortunately, the Cincinnati offense provided him with pretty tepid run support and Schneider lost 19 games in each of those three seasons.

But he had also been able to win 20 games in 1917, after future Hall of Fame hurler Christy Matthewson had taken over as Reds’ skipper and Schneider’s future was looking much brighter. But those 300 innings pitched per year had taken a toll on the kid’s right arm and he went just 10-15 with a 3.83 ERA during the 1918 regular season. Yankee skipper, Miller Huggins was obviously hoping a change of scenery would revive Schneider when he had his Yankee front office purchase the pitcher’s contract from the Reds. Determined to pitch his sore arm back into shape, Schneider decided to pitch winter ball that offseason. It was a fateful decision. In his first winter ball start he blew out his arm. He would end up appearing in just seven games in pinstripes in 1919 and then would never again play in another big league game.

Instead he and his lame arm returned to his native California, where he decided to convert himself into a full-time outfielder. He actually did pretty darn good with that effort. During his first four years as a Pacific Coast League position player he hit in the mid .330′s and he averaged 16 home runs per season. On May 11, 1923 he gained national attention by putting on one of the greatest offensive performances in the history of professional baseball. In a game against the Salt Lake City Bees, Schneider belted five home runs and a double and drove in 14 runs. He continued playing minor league ball until 1928. Unfortunately, his life after baseball took a tragic turn. In 1935, he got into a bar fight, allegedly defending his wife’s honor and killed a guy. He was found guilty of manslaughter and served prison time in San Quentin, where he would become manager of the famed penal institution’s baseball team. He died in 1957 at the age of 61.

Schneider shares his August 20th birthday with this great former Yankee third baseman and this one time Yankee pitching prospect.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1919 NYY 0 1 .000 3.41 7 4 1 0 0 0 29.0 19 14 11 1 22 11 1.414
6 Yrs 59 86 .407 2.66 207 157 36 84 10 4 1274.0 1199 541 377 16 498 487 1.332
CIN (5 yrs) 59 85 .410 2.65 200 153 35 84 10 4 1245.0 1180 527 366 15 476 476 1.330
NYY (1 yr) 0 1 .000 3.41 7 4 1 0 0 0 29.0 19 14 11 1 22 11 1.414
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/19/2013.

August 20 – Happy Birthday Brad Arnsberg

On August 5, 1987, the Yankees beat the Cleveland Indians, 5-2 to remain in first place in the AL East, a half-game ahead of the Blue Jays and three games ahead of third place Detroit. After the game, reporters asked then Yankee skipper Lou Piniella, what he thought about the performance of his rookie right-hander, Brad Arnsberg, who made his second-ever big league start that evening and got his first-ever Yankee victory. Sweet Lou took a puff on his victory cigar and praised the poise of the then-24-year-old, six foot four inch Arnsberg, telling reporters the youngster had shown a lot of poise out there.

Arnsberg had been showing a lot of poise since he first signed with the Yankees after New York selected him in the first round of the secondary phase of the 1983 MLB Amateur Draft. He had been assigned to the Yankees’ Greensboro farm team in the single A level Sally League and finished 12-5 with 4 shutouts in 1984. In ’85, the Yankees brought him north to Albany-Colonie, which is where I got to see him pitch for the first time and where he frequented the headlines of the Times-Union sports pages all season by going 14-2 for the double A A/C Yankees, with a microscopic 1.59 ERA. That got him a ticket to Columbus and triple A ball, where Arnsberg stumbled at first, going just 8-12 against the stiffer competition. He then rebounded to 12-5 for the Clippers the following year and everyone in the Yankee organization thought he was ready for the big show. His performance that night against Cleveland seemed to confirm those expectations.

Five days after that victory against Cleveland, Piniella gave the kid a start against the Royals and Arnsberg got hammered, giving up seven earned runs and three home runs against the Royals in Kansas City in a 10-1 Yankee loss. By then, New York had fallen a half game behind the Jays. They would end the season in fourth place nine games behind first-place Detroit who nipped ahead of second-place Toronto in September. Arnsberg would make a couple of more relief appearances in pinstripes but never again get the opportunity to start for Piniella or the Yankees. That November, the once promising Yankee right-hander became the property of the Texas Rangers, when New York made him the player to be named later in the trade they had made with Texas for Don Slaught.

After spending much of his first year with Texas on the DL and back in the minors, the Rangers put Arnsberg in their bullpen in ’89 and the following year, he appeared in 55 games, went 6-1 and saved 5, including Nolan Ryan’s 300th victory. That would be the Medford, Oregon native’s finest big leagues season. Within two years he found himself back in the minors and he eventually became a big league pitching coach for the Marlins, Blue Jays and most recently the Astros.

Arnsberg shares his August 20th birthday with this outstanding former Yankee third baseman and this long-ago Yankee pitcher who spent time in San Quentin.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1986 NYY 0 0 3.38 2 1 1 0 0 0 8.0 13 3 3 1 1 3 1.750
1987 NYY 1 3 .250 5.59 6 2 2 0 0 0 19.1 22 12 12 5 13 14 1.810
6 Yrs 9 6 .600 4.26 94 4 29 0 0 6 158.1 159 85 75 27 85 100 1.541
TEX (3 yrs) 8 3 .727 3.44 78 1 25 0 0 6 120.1 111 56 46 15 60 78 1.421
NYY (2 yrs) 1 3 .250 4.94 8 3 3 0 0 0 27.1 35 15 15 6 14 17 1.793
CLE (1 yr) 0 0 11.81 8 0 1 0 0 0 10.2 13 14 14 6 11 5 2.250
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/20/2013.

August 20 – Happy Birthday Graig Nettles

The Dodgers and the Yankees clashed in the 1978 World Series. If you’re a longtime Yankee fan, older than forty, you simply don’t forget Graig Nettles defensive performance in Game 3.

The Dodgers had jumped ahead of New York two games to none and only “Puff” and his well worn fielders glove prevented them from making it three straight wins. He made four great plays in that game. In the third inning, with New York ahead 2-1 and Bill Russell on first base with two outs, Nettles made a diving stop of Reggie Smith’s smash down the third base line and threw Smith out at first. In the fifth, with the tying run on second, Nettles again victimized Smith by knocking down his screaming line drive, preventing the run from scoring and holding the Dodger outfielder to an infield single. The very next hitter, Dodger first baseman, Steve Garvey then scorched another one at Nettles who backhanded it on his knees and forced the runner at second to end the inning. Yet again in the visitors’ half of the sixth, the Dodgers loaded the bases and with two outs, LA second baseman Davey Lopes sent another hard grounder in Nettles’ direction. After another great stop, he made another great throw, forcing the runner at second and ending another Dodger threat. As he ran toward the dugout, the Yankee Stadium crowd gave him a standing ovation. Nettles won Gold Gloves in 1977 and ’78.

Born in San Diego on this date in 1944, he was the AL Home Run Champion in 1976 and when he retired after the 1988 season he had 390 career home runs. 319 of those blasts were the most home runs ever by an AL third baseman. Great glove, plenty of power, a quick irreverent wit and that Game 3 performance sum up my memories of the Yankee’s All-Time great third baseman.

Nettles shares his August 20th birthday with this long-ago Yankee who ended up in San Quentin and  this one-time top Yankee pitching prospect.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1973 NYY 160 641 552 65 129 18 0 22 81 0 78 76 .234 .334 .386 .720
1974 NYY 155 638 566 74 139 21 1 22 75 1 59 75 .246 .316 .403 .718
1975 NYY 157 647 581 71 155 24 4 21 91 1 51 88 .267 .322 .430 .753
1976 NYY 158 657 583 88 148 29 2 32 93 11 62 94 .254 .327 .475 .802
1977 NYY 158 664 589 99 150 23 4 37 107 2 68 79 .255 .333 .496 .829
1978 NYY 159 662 587 81 162 23 2 27 93 1 59 69 .276 .343 .460 .803
1979 NYY 145 588 521 71 132 15 1 20 73 1 59 53 .253 .325 .401 .726
1980 NYY 89 369 324 52 79 14 0 16 45 0 42 42 .244 .331 .435 .766
1981 NYY 103 402 349 46 85 7 1 15 46 0 47 49 .244 .333 .398 .731
1982 NYY 122 461 405 47 94 11 2 18 55 1 51 49 .232 .317 .402 .719
1983 NYY 129 519 462 56 123 17 3 20 75 0 51 65 .266 .341 .446 .787
22 Yrs 2700 10228 8986 1193 2225 328 28 390 1314 32 1088 1209 .248 .329 .421 .750
NYY (11 yrs) 1535 6248 5519 750 1396 202 20 250 834 18 627 739 .253 .329 .433 .762
MIN (3 yrs) 121 348 304 40 68 12 3 12 34 1 39 67 .224 .314 .401 .715
SDP (3 yrs) 387 1380 1189 158 282 43 2 51 181 0 171 176 .237 .333 .405 .739
CLE (3 yrs) 465 1947 1704 224 426 59 2 71 218 12 220 183 .250 .338 .412 .750
ATL (1 yr) 112 201 177 16 37 8 1 5 33 1 22 25 .209 .294 .350 .644
MON (1 yr) 80 104 93 5 16 4 0 1 14 0 9 19 .172 .240 .247 .488
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/20/2013.