Results tagged ‘ april 20 ’

April 20 – Happy Birthday Don Mattingly

mattingly.jpgDon Mattingly’s first game in a Yankee uniform took place in 1982, the season after the Yankees lost a World Series to the LA Dodgers. His career in pinstripes lasted until 1995. One year later the Yankees would finally make it back to the Fall Classic, with their victory over Atlanta. “Donnie Baseball” was the first person I thought about when New York third baseman Charlie Hayes squeezed the foul-popped final out of the 1996 World Series in his glove.

During his first six full seasons with New York, Mattingly averaged 203 hits per year, 27 home runs, 114 RBIs and hit .327. He also made the All Star team each of those seasons, won five Gold Gloves for his outstanding play at first base and was voted AL MVP in 1985. During that period, he was the best and most popular player in baseball and he along with Dave Winfield made the Yankees perennial contenders in the very tough AL East.

Even though they missed the playoffs every year, those Mattingly-Winfield-led Yankee teams played every inning of every game with a hustle and determination that made you proud to be a Yankee fan. In 1990, Mattingly injured his back and it never fully healed. The impact of the injury on his swing and his power was immediate, significant and permanent. Still he persevered, playing six more seasons. I remember feeling so bad for him when a strike ended the 1994 regular season and prevented the Yankees, who were in first place at the time, from playing in Mattingly’s first-ever postseason. Fortunately, New York did get there in ’95. Those of us who followed him closely throughout his career will never forget his outstanding performance during those five October games against the Mariners. He had ten hits in that series with a homer and six RBIs and he averaged .417. Even though New York lost, Mattingly’s farewell effort to Yankee fans was one of the most poignant moments in franchise history. Donnie Baseball turns fifty-two-years-old today. I still miss watching him play the game.

Mattingly shares his birthday with this long-ago New York outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1982 NYY 7 13 12 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 .167 .154 .167 .321
1983 NYY 91 305 279 34 79 15 4 4 32 0 0 21 31 .283 .333 .409 .742
1984 NYY 153 662 603 91 207 44 2 23 110 1 1 41 33 .343 .381 .537 .918
1985 NYY 159 727 652 107 211 48 3 35 145 2 2 56 41 .324 .371 .567 .939
1986 NYY 162 742 677 117 238 53 2 31 113 0 0 53 35 .352 .394 .573 .967
1987 NYY 141 630 569 93 186 38 2 30 115 1 4 51 38 .327 .378 .559 .937
1988 NYY 144 651 599 94 186 37 0 18 88 1 0 41 29 .311 .353 .462 .816
1989 NYY 158 693 631 79 191 37 2 23 113 3 0 51 30 .303 .351 .477 .828
1990 NYY 102 428 394 40 101 16 0 5 42 1 0 28 20 .256 .308 .335 .643
1991 NYY 152 646 587 64 169 35 0 9 68 2 0 46 42 .288 .339 .394 .733
1992 NYY 157 686 640 89 184 40 0 14 86 3 0 39 43 .288 .327 .416 .742
1993 NYY 134 596 530 78 154 27 2 17 86 0 0 61 42 .291 .364 .445 .809
1994 NYY 97 436 372 62 113 20 1 6 51 0 0 60 24 .304 .397 .411 .808
1995 NYY 128 507 458 59 132 32 2 7 49 0 2 40 35 .288 .341 .413 .754
14 Yrs 1785 7722 7003 1007 2153 442 20 222 1099 14 9 588 444 .307 .358 .471 .830
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/20/2013.

April 20 – Happy Birthday Charlie Hemphill

hemphillWhat was the worst Yankee team in history? During my time as a Yankee fan the candidates for this dubious honor would be the 1966 team that finished dead last in the AL with a 70-89 record or Stump Merrill’s 1990 squad, which finished at the bottom of the AL East Division with a horrid 67-95 mark. Both those teams filled a summer of my life with sports agony. But when you’re trying to identify the very worst Yankee team in the history of the franchise, you have to place the New York Highlander squad of 1908 at the very top of the heap, or more accurately, the very bottom of the pile.

They finished the season with a 51-103 record, which represents a .331 winning percentage, a low-water mark that has stood as the franchise record for team futility for over a century. Today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant was the starting right-fielder on that 1908 Yankee/Highlander debacle.

New York had acquired Hemphill the previous November in a trade with the Browns. At the time of that deal, this Greenville, Michigan native was 31-years-old and a veteran of eight big league seasons and five different big league franchises. There were good reasons why he kept his suitcase packed all those years. The guy had hands of stone and he had a real problem with alcohol. On the positive side, in an era when the game was played with the deadest baseball of all-time, Hemphill was considered a good stick. It was his ability with a bat that kept him from getting benched for his poor fielding and persistent drinking and it was the same reason why, whenever a team got tired enough of those faults to get rid of him, he seemed to have no trouble finding a new team willing to take him on.

That 1908 Yankee team did not start out bad. Their Manager, Hall-of-Famer Clark Griffith actually got them out of the gate quickly that year by winning 16 of their first 24 games. But when they lost 24 of their next 32 contests, the bitterly disappointed Griffith resigned and the penny-pinching Highlander ownership made New York’s mercurial shortstop, Kid Elberfeld the team’s player-manager. At the time there wasn’t an umpire in the league who didn’t hate Elberfeld. I’m not certain if that collective hatred had anything to do with the Highlanders going 27-71 under their new manager but I can guarantee you that none of the “men in blue” felt a tinge of sorrow for the Kid’s historic failure in his new role.

Just about the only thing that wasn’t horrible on that 1908 Highlander team was the performance of Charley Hemphill. He put together the best season of his big league career. He led the team in runs, hits, RBIs and average. He also stole a career-high 42 bases. The only things that didn’t improve were his defense (he made 20 errors in ’08) and his drinking but Hemphill had built up enough good will with his offensive performance during his inaugural year in New York that he remained a member of the club’s roster for four seasons.

The team finally released him after the 1911 season and he was able to land a coveted player managing position with a minor league team in Atlanta. But before his first season in that post was over, he was fired because of his drinking and ended up moving to Detroit and working in the auto industry.

Hemphill shares his April 20th birthday with one of my all-time favorite Yankees.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1908 NYY 142 581 505 62 150 12 9 0 44 42 59 43 .297 .374 .356 .730
1909 NYY 73 216 181 23 44 5 1 0 10 10 32 23 .243 .357 .282 .639
1910 NYY 102 419 351 45 84 9 4 0 21 19 55 27 .239 .350 .288 .638
1911 NYY 69 244 201 32 57 4 2 1 15 9 37 18 .284 .397 .338 .736
11 Yrs 1242 5093 4541 580 1230 117 68 22 421 207 435 429 .271 .337 .341 .678
SLB (5 yrs) 629 2682 2425 306 663 72 37 15 232 109 196 267 .273 .329 .352 .681
NYY (4 yrs) 386 1460 1238 162 335 30 16 1 90 80 183 111 .271 .369 .323 .692
STL (1 yr) 11 45 37 4 9 0 0 1 3 0 6 0 .243 .364 .324 .688
BOS (1 yr) 136 595 545 71 142 10 10 3 62 11 39 26 .261 .312 .332 .644
CLV (1 yr) 55 209 202 23 56 3 5 2 23 3 6 14 .277 .301 .371 .673
CLE (1 yr) 25 102 94 14 25 2 0 0 11 4 5 11 .266 .303 .287 .590
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/20/2013.