November 2013

November 10 – Happy Birthday Chick Fewster

fewsterIt would not take too long for just about any Yankee fan to corresctly guess who hit the first World Series home run in franchise history. That would be the one and only Babe Ruth. The Bambino hit the historic blast in Game 4 of the 1921 World Series versus the Yankees’ Polo Grounds landlord at the time, the mighty New York Giants. But even the most astute fan of Bronx Bomber baseball could keep guessing for the next ten years and not come up with the name of the second Yankee to perform that same feat.

The correct answer of course, is today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant, Wilson Lloyd “Chick” Fewster. His two-run blast in the top of the second inning of that same Fall Classic’s very next game, gave the Yankees a temporary 5-3 lead they would eventually lose. Its no wonder the name “Chick Fewster” means nothing to Yankee fans. After all, his entire Yankee career consisted of just 228 games spread over six lackluster seasons beginning in 1917. Back then, Yankee manager Miller Huggins was predicting great things for his young outfielder, telling the New York sports press that he had never seen a better prospect than this new kid from Baltimore. But Fewster would never fulfill that promise and he almost didn’t live long enough to hit that World Series home run either.

In a 1920 spring training game against the Brooklyn Robins, Fewster was hit in the head by a pitch and nearly died. They put a plate in his head and doctors told him he’d never play baseball again. Miraculously, he was back in action by early July of that same season.

He shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this one-time Yankee DH.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1917 NYY 11 41 36 2 8 0 0 0 1 1 5 5 .222 .317 .222 .539
1918 NYY 5 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 .500 .500 1.000
1919 NYY 81 295 244 38 69 9 3 1 15 8 34 36 .283 .386 .357 .743
1920 NYY 21 36 21 8 6 1 0 0 1 0 7 2 .286 .464 .333 .798
1921 NYY 66 247 207 44 58 19 0 1 19 4 28 43 .280 .382 .386 .768
1922 NYY 44 162 132 20 32 4 1 1 9 2 16 23 .242 .324 .311 .635
11 Yrs 644 2308 1963 282 506 91 12 6 167 57 240 264 .258 .346 .326 .672
NYY (6 yrs) 228 783 642 113 174 33 4 3 45 15 90 109 .271 .372 .349 .721
BOS (2 yrs) 113 424 367 40 91 14 2 0 24 15 45 45 .248 .337 .297 .634
BRO (2 yrs) 109 397 338 54 82 16 3 2 24 9 45 49 .243 .340 .325 .666
CLE (2 yrs) 194 704 616 75 159 28 3 1 74 18 60 61 .258 .327 .318 .645
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/9/2013.

November 9 – Happy Birthday Harvey Hendrick

hendricksAfter Miller Huggins’ Yankee team lost their second straight World Series to the New York Giants in 1922, the diminutive field skipper spent his offseason trying to figure out what his ball club needed in the way of personnel to finally beat his crosstown rivals in a Fall Classic. He brought his shopping list with him to the Yanks 1923 spring training camp in New Orleans and it included an infielder, two pitchers, a third string catcher and two new outfielders. One of those outfielders ended up being today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant.

Harvey “Gink” Hendrick was born in Mason, TN in 1897 and had played college ball at Vanderbilt University, his native state’s most famous school. He then spent a couple of years in the minors including a solid 1922 season with Galveston in the Texas League during which he belted 16 home runs and averaged .311. The Red Sox signed him to a contract but in early January of 1923, he was traded to New York along with pitcher George Pipgras. Hendrick then performed well enough that spring to earn a spot on Huggins’ Opening Day roster.

He ended up serving as a fifth outfielder and occasional pinch-hitter on that 1923 Yankee squad, which featured a strong starting outfield of Babe Ruth,Bob Meusel and Whitey Witt along with the veteran Elmer Smith as their primary backup. Like fellow rookie and teammate, Lou Gehrig, Hendrick spent most of that season sitting on the Yankee bench. Fortunately for him, however, New York dominated the AL Pennant race that year, beating second place Detroit by a full 16 games. That permitted Huggins to rest his starters the whole final month of his season. That meant lots of playing time for Hendrick and he made the most of it, raising his average by 40 points and hitting all three of his rookie season home runs that September. His strong finish helped convince Huggins to keep the rookie outfielder on the Yanks’ postseason roster. Hendrick made his one and only career World Series appearance in the eighth inning of that Series’ first game as a pinch hitter for Yankee shortstop Everett Scott, flying out to center off of Giants’ reliever Rosey Ryan. He did end up winning a coveted ring.

He spent one more season in New York in 1924, playing about as much and performing about as well as he did the year before. The Yanks released him after that second season and he ended up with the Indians in 1925 and back in the minors in ’26. He got his break in 1927 when he became an often-used utility player for a pretty bad Brooklyn Robins team. For the next three seasons he averaged 120 games played and over 400 at bats playing some outfield, some third base and some first base for Brooklyn. He averaged over .300 in each of those seasons including a career high .354 in 1929.

The Robins traded Hendrick to Cincinnati at the start of the 1931 regular season and he would later also play for the Cardinals and Phillies before his big league career ended in 1936. Evidently, Hendrick struggled in life after his playing days were over because in 1941 he committed suicide by shooting himself in his Covington, Tennessee home. Other former Yankees who have taken their own lives include; Dan McGann, Jake Powell, Hugh Casey and most recently, Hideki Irabu.

Hendrick shares a birthday with this one-time Yankee second baseman and this former Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1923 NYY 37 69 66 9 18 3 1 3 12 3 2 8 .273 .294 .485 .779
1924 NYY 40 80 76 7 20 0 0 1 11 1 2 7 .263 .291 .303 .594
11 Yrs 922 3219 2910 434 896 157 46 48 413 75 239 243 .308 .364 .443 .807
BRO (5 yrs) 433 1604 1435 236 456 68 28 34 219 61 129 113 .318 .378 .475 .853
CIN (2 yrs) 231 1021 928 130 287 62 12 5 115 6 76 69 .309 .363 .418 .782
NYY (2 yrs) 77 149 142 16 38 3 1 4 23 4 4 15 .268 .293 .387 .680
PHI (1 yr) 59 127 116 12 34 8 0 0 19 0 9 15 .293 .344 .362 .706
STL (1 yr) 28 77 72 8 18 2 0 1 5 0 5 9 .250 .299 .319 .618
CHC (1 yr) 69 208 189 30 55 13 3 4 23 4 13 17 .291 .346 .455 .801
CLE (1 yr) 25 33 28 2 8 1 2 0 9 0 3 5 .286 .355 .464 .819
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/9/2013.

November 8 – Happy Birthday Bucky Harris

harrisWhen Del Webb and Dan Topping purchased the Yankees in 1945, they needed a baseball man to run things and they selected former Dodger and Cardinal team president, Larry MacPhail to fulfill that role. The two multi-millionaires loaned MacPhail the $900,000 he needed to purchase ten percent of the team. That presented a problem for legendary Yankee Manager, Joe McCarthy, who did not like MacPhail. It became the key reason why Marse Joe quit as the Yankee skipper 35 games into the 1946 season. He was replaced by Yankee catching legend Bill Dickey, who had been one of McCarthy’s coaches.

The Yankees finished in third place in 1946 and Dickey did not even finish the season as manager, resigning that September, as soon as the Red Sox had eliminated New York from the pennant race. Two days after Dickey quit as skipper, MacPhail hired Bucky Harris to an unnamed front office position, to serve as MacPhail’s personal liason with the Yankee clubhouse. Harris then got the Manager’s job after the 1946 season ended.

Bucky had become famous in 1926, when at just 27 years of age, he became the player manager of the Senators and led the team to a World Series Championship that season. That title earned him the nickname “The Boy Wonder.” He then continued to manage for the next two decades but had not won another World Series.

The Yankee team he inherited in 1947 was getting old and ornery.  His outfield was a mess. Joe DiMaggio had sore heels, Charley Keller a bad back and Tommy Henrich had turned 37 and hit just .251 in 1946. His infield wasn’t any better. First baseman Nick Etten had become an automatic out once big league pitchers returned from serving in WWII plus he was a horrible defensive first baseman. Third baseman Snuffy Stirnweiss was also a much less effective hitter against post war pitching and both second baseman Joe Gordon and shortstop Phil Rizzuto had a difficult time getting their swings back after their military service. As for pitching, Red Ruffing had retired and Spud Chandler was getting old fast.

Working with MacPhail, Harris made a series of moves that turned out to be genius-like. He replaced Etten at first with 38-year old George McQuinn, an NL veteran with a decent glove and good bat. MacPhail traded Joe Gordon to the Indians for pitcher Allie Reynolds and Harris switched Stirnweiss from third to Gordon’s old spot at second and inserted rookie Billy Johnson at the hot corner. He benched Keller and made Johnny Lindell his starting left fielder. His best move was converting Yankee starter Joe Page to his closer. Each of these maneuvers panned out perfectly and with DiMaggio, Henrich and Rizzuto all enjoying bounce back seasons, the Yankees rolled to the 1947 AL Pennant, finishing a dozen games ahead of the second place Tigers. A few weeks later, Harris had his second World Championship as a Manager when the Yankees beat the Dodgers in seven games.

Despite winning 94 games the following season, the Yankees finished a disappointing third in the AL Pennant race. MacPhail had also been bought out by Topping and Webb, who had installed George Weiss as the new Yankee GM. Weiss used the Yankees third place finish in ’47 as an excuse to replace Harris with his own man, Casey Stengel.

If a Manager was hired in today’s times, who then won 191 regular season games during his first two years managing a team plus a World Series, he’d get a multi-year contract worth eight figures. Instead, Bucky Harris got fired. In all, Harris managed 30 years in the Majors. He was named to the Hall of Fame by the Veterans’ Committee in 1975.

Harris shares his birthday with this short-time Yankee outfielder.

Rk Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% G Finish
21 1947 50 New York Yankees AL 97 57 .630 155 1 WS Champs
22 1948 51 New York Yankees AL 94 60 .610 154 3
Boston Red Sox 1 year 76 76 .500 153 4.0
Philadelphia Phillies 1 year 39 53 .424 94 7.0
New York Yankees 2 years 191 117 .620 309 2.0 1 Pennant and 1 World Series Title
Washington Senators 18 years 1336 1416 .485 2776 4.9 2 Pennants and 1 World Series Title
Detroit Tigers 7 years 516 557 .481 1078 5.4
29 years 2158 2219 .493 4410 4.9 3 Pennants and 2 World Series Titles
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/7/2013.

November 7 – Happy Birthday Jim Kaat

The “Scooter” will always be my all-time favorite Yankee announcer but not because he was a particularly good analyst or play-by-play guy. Quite the opposite, he was petty bad at both. But Rizzuto helped me enjoy Yankee broadcasts regardless if the team won or lost and he wore and flashed his unabashed lack of objectivity on behalf of the Bronx Bombers like a badge of honor.

 As much as I enjoyed Rizzuto, I appreciated Jim Kaat. His award-winning commentary taught me things I didn’t know about the game of baseball and how it is played at the highest of levels. He did a great job of explaining technical things to his non-technical audience, like why a curve ball curves, what pitchers have to be prepared for in a suicide squeeze situation, and how the best fielding catchers play the spin of the ball on foul pops.

Unlike Rizzuto, who played his ball before my time during the forties and early fifties, “Kitty” played his rookie season just one year before I became an avid fan of Major League baseball. I loved to listen to him talk about his personal experiences with ballplayers he played with and against, especially during the sixties. Back before you could watch every Yankee game on TV or bring up Major League Baseball’s Web site on the Internet, the only things I knew about players like Bob Allison, Zoilio Versailles, Don Mossi, or Leon Wagner were printed on the backs of the baseball cards that I collected as a kid.  Kaat’s vivid memories of the players I grew up watching gave life to the faces on those cards for me.

In addition to announcing for the Yankees for a dozen seasons, Kaat pitched in Pinstripes for parts of both the 1979 and 1980 seasons. He ended his 25-year playing career three seasons later, with 283 career victories. Jim Kaat belongs in the Hall-of-Fame.

Also celebrating a birthday today is this former Ole Miss quarterback and this one-time knuckle-balling starting pitcher.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1979 NYY 2 3 .400 3.86 40 1 13 0 0 2 58.1 64 29 25 4 14 23 1.337
1980 NYY 0 1 .000 7.20 4 0 3 0 0 0 5.0 8 5 4 0 4 1 2.400
25 Yrs 283 237 .544 3.45 898 625 102 180 31 18 4530.1 4620 2038 1738 395 1083 2461 1.259
MIN (15 yrs) 190 159 .544 3.34 484 433 20 133 23 6 3014.1 2982 1343 1118 279 729 1851 1.231
PHI (4 yrs) 27 30 .474 4.23 102 87 6 11 2 0 536.2 611 266 252 51 109 188 1.342
STL (4 yrs) 19 16 .543 3.82 176 17 59 6 1 10 292.1 327 145 124 19 83 98 1.403
CHW (3 yrs) 45 28 .616 3.10 92 87 1 30 5 0 623.2 628 250 215 42 144 300 1.238
NYY (2 yrs) 2 4 .333 4.12 44 1 16 0 0 2 63.1 72 34 29 4 18 24 1.421
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/7/2013.

November 6 – Happy Birthday John Candelaria

The New York Yankees were a very competitive team from 1982 until the wheels came off in 1989. In fact, no team in baseball won more games than New York did during that time but, they failed to make the playoffs in each of those seasons. With Don Mattingly, Dave Winfield and Ricky Henderson in their lineup for much of that decade, offense wasn’t the problem for New York but starting pitching and managerial consistency was. It seemed as if every season, the Yankees had at least one new manager and three new starters in their rotation. In 1988, the Yankee front office signed former Pirate ace, John Candelaria to a free agent contract and hoped he would anchor their staff. For half a season, the “Candy Man” did just that, going 8-2 and helping New York get out to a quick start and take the Eastern Division lead for Manager Billy Martin, who was on his fifth tour of duty that year as Yankee skipper. As usual, however, Martin was fired on June 23rd of that season, when Clyde King, George Steinbrenner’s personal scout told the Boss that Martin had behaved unprofessionally by leaving reliever Tim Stoddard in a game in which he was getting shelled. King felt it was because Billy disliked Stoddard. By the time Lou Piniella took over for Martin,  Candelaria’s knee was hurting and he won just five of his last ten decisions. The Yankees ended up finishing in fifth place, but were just 3.5 games behind Division winning Boston. That 1988 season really was the straw that ended up breaking the Yankee’s back. The next four Yankee teams finished below five hundred under five different Managers, going through a whole bunch of different starting pitchers. Martin died drunk, when his pickup truck drove off the road and Steinbrenner was actually banned from the game for his role in the Howie Spira episode.

When Candelaria got off to a 3-3 start for New York in 1989, he was traded to the Expos for an infielder named Mike Blowers. The New York City-born southpaw tried to make the Yankees winners again but in the end, the Candy Man couldn’t.

Also born on this date was this one-time Yankee post season hero and this former Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1988 NYY 13 7 .650 3.38 25 24 1 6 2 1 157.0 150 69 59 18 23 121 1.102
1989 NYY 3 3 .500 5.14 10 6 1 1 0 0 49.0 49 28 28 8 12 37 1.245
19 Yrs 177 122 .592 3.33 600 356 82 54 13 29 2525.2 2399 1038 935 245 592 1673 1.184
PIT (12 yrs) 124 87 .588 3.17 345 271 42 45 9 16 1873.0 1763 731 660 172 436 1159 1.174
CAL (3 yrs) 25 11 .694 3.77 49 49 0 2 2 0 279.1 265 133 117 28 70 208 1.199
LAD (2 yrs) 3 6 .333 3.36 109 0 21 0 0 7 59.0 51 25 22 4 24 61 1.271
NYY (2 yrs) 16 10 .615 3.80 35 30 2 7 2 1 206.0 199 97 87 26 35 158 1.136
MIN (1 yr) 7 3 .700 3.39 34 1 10 0 0 4 58.1 55 23 22 9 9 44 1.097
NYM (1 yr) 2 0 1.000 5.84 3 3 0 0 0 0 12.1 17 8 8 1 3 10 1.622
MON (1 yr) 0 2 .000 3.31 12 0 2 0 0 0 16.1 17 8 6 3 4 14 1.286
TOR (1 yr) 0 3 .000 5.48 13 2 5 0 0 1 21.1 32 13 13 2 11 19 2.016
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/6/2013.

November 5 – Happy Birthday Sonny Dixon

dixonJohn Craig “Sonny” Dixon was already a good enough pitcher at the age of sixteen to be signed to a contract by the Washington Senators just before the 1941 season started. At that young of an age you would expect him to struggle during his first couple of seasons of pro ball and he did. But instead of being allowed to mature on a minor league mound, this big right-hander from Charlotte, North Carolina was called into the Navy and spent the next three years of his life battling the Japanese in the Pacific. He was still only 21 years of age when he returned from Service and put together an impressive 19-11 season for the Senators’ Class B affiliate in his hometown of Charlotte, in 1946.

You’d think that performance would have been good enough to put Dixon on a fast track to the parent club, especially since Washington was a pretty bad ball club back then. The post WWII Senators never found themselves in a Pennant race so one would have expected them to give their top minor league pitching prospects plenty of chances to pitch at the big league level. Dixon, however, would end up spending another six full seasons in Washington’s farm system, finally making his big league debut in 1953. He posted a 5-8 first year record in 20 appearances that included 6 starts. He went 6-9 in his sophomore season during which he was traded to the Philadelphia Athletics.

In 1956, Yankee GM George Weiss was on the prowl for relief pitchers who could shore up Casey Stengel’s bullpen for the second half stretch drive. In May of that season, he sent 37-year-old Johnny Sain and 39-year-old Enos Slaughter to the A’s in exchange for Dixon. The Yanks then kept their new pitcher down in Richmond until the very end of the season, when he was called up so that Stengel could rest his best arms for the postseason. Dixon made three appearances in ten days, losing his only Yankee decision during his final performance in pinstripes. His final pitch as a Yankee turned out to also be his final pitch as a big leaguer.

Dixon spent the next five seasons pitching back in the minors before returning to Charlotte where he worked as a convenience store manager. He passed away at the age of 87 in 2011. Folks might wonder how a guy who lived the life of a Major League ballplayer could feel happy and satisfied working the rest of his life in a convenience store in his home town. Sonny Dixon signed a professional baseball contract as a 16-year-old and fought in WWII while still a teenager. Perhaps Old Sonny felt he had enough excitement just in those five years to last him a lifetime.

Dixon shares his birthday with this former outfielder who helped end one memorable Yankee postseason and win another.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1956 NYY 0 1 .000 2.08 3 0 2 0 0 1 4.1 5 3 1 0 5 1 2.308
4 Yrs 11 18 .379 4.17 102 12 52 4 0 9 263.0 296 141 122 25 75 90 1.411
WSH (2 yrs) 6 10 .375 3.61 59 6 26 3 0 4 149.2 149 72 60 16 43 47 1.283
KCA (2 yrs) 5 7 .417 5.04 40 6 24 1 0 4 109.0 142 66 61 9 27 42 1.550
NYY (1 yr) 0 1 .000 2.08 3 0 2 0 0 1 4.1 5 3 1 0 5 1 2.308
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/5/2013.

November 4 – Happy Birthday Ryan Thompson

You can consider yourself a solid fan of Yankee baseball if you can remember this Chestertown, MD native, who was born on November 4, 1967. He played his first four seasons of big league ball as a regularly-used spare outfielder with the Mets. In 2000, he was signed as a free agent by the Yankees after that season’s All Star break. He got off to a fast start, driving in five runs during his first two games in pinstripes. In 33 games that year, he hit .260 and drove in 14 runs. The Yankees did not put him on that season’s postseason roster and released Thompson in the off-season that followed.

The only other Yankee I could find who was born on November 2nd is this Yankee pitcher from the late 1930s.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2000 NYY 33 56 50 12 13 3 0 3 14 0 5 12 .260 .339 .500 .839
9 Yrs 416 1385 1257 165 305 71 6 52 176 9 90 347 .243 .301 .433 .734
NYM (4 yrs) 283 1106 997 127 238 53 4 39 126 8 74 276 .239 .300 .417 .717
CLE (1 yr) 8 23 22 2 7 0 0 1 5 0 1 6 .318 .348 .455 .802
NYY (1 yr) 33 56 50 12 13 3 0 3 14 0 5 12 .260 .339 .500 .839
FLA (1 yr) 18 32 31 6 9 5 0 0 2 0 1 8 .290 .313 .452 .764
HOU (1 yr) 12 22 20 2 4 1 0 1 5 0 2 7 .200 .273 .400 .673
MIL (1 yr) 62 146 137 16 34 9 2 8 24 1 7 38 .248 .295 .518 .813
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/4/2013.

November 3 – Happy Birthday Armando Benitez

Armando Benitez provided several memorable moments in Yankee history, but none of them took place during the short time the fire-balling right hander wore a Yankee uniform. It was Benitez who gave up the famous Derek Jeter - Jeffrey Maier home run during the 1996 ALCS that helped the Yankees beat Baltimore for the AL Pennant that year. Then two seasons later, after Bernie Williams hit a huge three-run late-inning home run off of him, Benitez not only hit the next batter, Tino Martinez, he then openly challenged the Yankee dugout to a fight, setting off one of the most memorable brawls in pinstripe history. Then when Benitez joined the Mets in 1999, he eventually took over the closer role from John Franco. During his three full seasons in that role, Benitez saved 117 games while Mariano Rivera was saving 114 for the Yankees. The “who had the better closer” argument became one of many dramatic sub-titles to the 2000 Subway World Series.

So as a Yankee fan, I have lots of Armando Benitez memories but I almost forgot he actually pitched in pinstripes for nine games during the 2003 season. The Yankees had got him from the Mets for three minor league prospects hoping he would be the eighth inning setup guy for Rivera. When he faltered in that role, the Yankees traded him to Seattle for former Yankee set-up specialist, Jeff Nelson. Through 2008, the last season he saw action in the Major Leagues, Benitez compiled a career total of 289 saves.

Armando was born on November 3, 1972, in the Dominican Republic. He shares his birthday with this former Yankee starting pitcher who never seemed to get a chance to pitch,  this former Yankee reliever who got way too many opportunities to do so and this former Yankee manager.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2003 NYY 1 1 .500 1.93 9 0 2 0 0 0 9.1 8 4 2 0 6 10 1.500
15 Yrs 40 47 .460 3.13 762 0 527 0 0 289 779.0 545 296 271 95 403 946 1.217
NYM (5 yrs) 18 14 .563 2.70 333 0 266 0 0 160 347.0 225 111 104 39 168 456 1.133
BAL (5 yrs) 11 16 .407 3.62 207 0 107 0 0 37 213.2 149 91 86 27 129 283 1.301
SFG (3 yrs) 6 8 .429 4.10 90 0 77 0 0 45 85.2 81 41 39 14 46 72 1.482
FLA (2 yrs) 4 7 .364 2.72 100 0 66 0 0 47 102.2 68 39 31 11 41 101 1.062
SEA (1 yr) 0 0 3.14 15 0 7 0 0 0 14.1 10 5 5 1 11 15 1.465
NYY (1 yr) 1 1 .500 1.93 9 0 2 0 0 0 9.1 8 4 2 0 6 10 1.500
TOR (1 yr) 0 1 .000 5.68 8 0 2 0 0 0 6.1 4 5 4 3 2 9 0.947
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/3/2013.

November 2 – Happy Birthday Wilson Betemit

I always thought Wilson Betemit could become a big league All Star. He is a switch-hitter with decent power who can play a decent third base and even an adequate shortstop in an emergency. He saw quite a bit of action with the Yankees in 2008 and the more he played the better he seemed to hit the ball. I knew he wasn’t going to see much action in the Yankee’s All Star infield that year but still, when he was traded to the White Sox, after that season I was sort of disappointed to see him go. The fact that the Yankees got Nick Swisher for him turned out to make the swap pretty much a steal for New York.

Betemit signed with the Royals in 2010 and hit .295, while smacking 13 home runs and driving in 43 for KC in just 84 games. He began the 2011 season with the Royals but was traded to the Tigers that July. Detroit Manager Jim Leyland credited Betemit’s play during the second half of that year as one of the key reasons why his Tigers rallied to win the AL Central Division race. In 2012, he signed with the Orioles and became Buck Showalter’s starting third baseman. He hit a creditable .261 with 12 home runs but lost his job when the O’s brought up the very impressive 19-year-old Manny Machado in August of that year. Betemit sat the Baltimore bench from that point on and was released in September of 2013. He is still just 32 years old but it looks like he might never get the opportunity to put together that all star season I thought he could.

Also born on this date is the only member of the Yankee’s all time roster to have been born in Aruba.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2007 NYY 37 92 84 11 19 4 0 4 24 0 6 33 .226 .278 .417 .694
2008 NYY 87 198 189 24 50 13 0 6 25 0 6 56 .265 .289 .429 .718
11 Yrs 805 2335 2093 264 558 126 8 75 283 9 211 612 .267 .332 .442 .774
ATL (4 yrs) 233 550 495 69 139 28 4 13 52 4 47 131 .281 .341 .432 .774
KCR (2 yrs) 141 541 479 65 139 35 1 16 70 3 56 132 .290 .362 .468 .830
LAD (2 yrs) 139 385 330 41 78 15 0 19 50 1 49 94 .236 .332 .455 .787
NYY (2 yrs) 124 290 273 35 69 17 0 10 49 0 12 89 .253 .286 .425 .711
BAL (2 yrs) 108 386 351 41 89 19 0 12 40 0 31 106 .254 .313 .410 .724
DET (1 yr) 40 133 120 11 35 7 3 5 19 1 11 47 .292 .346 .525 .871
CHW (1 yr) 20 50 45 2 9 5 0 0 3 0 5 13 .200 .280 .311 .591
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/2/2013.

November 1 – Happy Birthday Ham Hyatt

Ham-HyattHis full name was Robert Hamilton Hyatt. Fred Leib, one of a small group of widely read sportswriters who helped give early 20th century New York City baseball its amazing color, described today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant as “one of the game’s greatest pinch-hitters.” If Leib wrote it, it must have been true.

Ham Hamilton was the first player in baseball history to amass 50 pinch-hits during his career. The native of North Carolina made his big league debut with the 1909 World Champion Pittsburgh Pirates and instantly exhibited a penchant for coming off the bench in key situations and delivering big hits. He averaged .299 that year and in the process he impressed Fred Clarke enough with his stick work that the Pittsburgh manager tried to make him the team’s starting first baseman the following season. That experiment failed because in addition to being a poor defensive player, Hyatt just didn’t seem to hit as well when he got more than one chance per game to do so.

Probably because the Pirates didn’t think they could afford the luxury of carrying a full-time pinch-hitter, Hyatt went back to the minors in 1911. He would reappear in Pittsburgh the following season however and remained with the team as their primary pinch-hitter for the next three years. When his average took a precipitous dip to just .215 in 1915, the Pirates put him on waivers and he was claimed by the Cardinals. It was in St. Louis that Hyatt met future Yankee manager Miller Huggins, who was the starting second baseman on that 1915 St. Louis team. The two men became good friends.

Three years later, Huggins was in his first season as manager for New York and with World War I causing a shortage of ballplayers, Hug needed a left handed bat for his bench. At the time, Hyatt’s contract was owned by the Boston Braves but he was playing for a minor league team in the Southern Association and leading that league in home runs. When the Yankees were able to purchase his contract from the Braves in June of that 1918 season, the one-time Cardinal teammates were reunited. Huggins gave his old buddy plenty of playing time but Ham was 33-years-old by then and could only manage a .229 batting average during his  first season in New York. There would be no second season. Hyatt would end up playing in the Pacific Coast League until 1923, finally retiring for good at the age of 38.

Ham Hyatt shares his birthday with another WWI era Yankee.

Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
NYY 53 142 131 11 30 8 0 2 10 1 8 8 .229 .273 .336 .609
7 Yrs 465 1012 925 85 247 36 23 10 146 11 63 87 .267 .321 .388 .709
PIT (5 yrs) 306 540 499 51 138 20 14 6 90 7 27 55 .277 .323 .409 .732
STL (1 yr) 106 330 295 23 79 8 9 2 46 3 28 24 .268 .337 .376 .714
NYY (1 yr) 53 142 131 11 30 8 0 2 10 1 8 8 .229 .273 .336 .609
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/31/2013.