November 9 – Happy Birthday Harvey Hendrick

hendricksAfter Miller Huggins’ Yankee team lost their second straight World Series to the New York Giants in 1922, the diminutive field skipper spent his offseason trying to figure out what his ball club needed in the way of personnel to finally beat his crosstown rivals in a Fall Classic. He brought his shopping list with him to the Yanks 1923 spring training camp in New Orleans and it included an infielder, two pitchers, a third string catcher and two new outfielders. One of those outfielders ended up being today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant.

Harvey “Gink” Hendrick was born in Mason, TN in 1897 and had played college ball at Vanderbilt University, his native state’s most famous school. He then spent a couple of years in the minors including a solid 1922 season with Galveston in the Texas League during which he belted 16 home runs and averaged .311. The Red Sox signed him to a contract but in early January of 1923, he was traded to New York along with pitcher George Pipgras. Hendrick then performed well enough that spring to earn a spot on Huggins’ Opening Day roster.

He ended up serving as a fifth outfielder and occasional pinch-hitter on that 1923 Yankee squad, which featured a strong starting outfield of Babe Ruth,Bob Meusel and Whitey Witt along with the veteran Elmer Smith as their primary backup. Like fellow rookie and teammate, Lou Gehrig, Hendrick spent most of that season sitting on the Yankee bench. Fortunately for him, however, New York dominated the AL Pennant race that year, beating second place Detroit by a full 16 games. That permitted Huggins to rest his starters the whole final month of his season. That meant lots of playing time for Hendrick and he made the most of it, raising his average by 40 points and hitting all three of his rookie season home runs that September. His strong finish helped convince Huggins to keep the rookie outfielder on the Yanks’ postseason roster. Hendrick made his one and only career World Series appearance in the eighth inning of that Series’ first game as a pinch hitter for Yankee shortstop Everett Scott, flying out to center off of Giants’ reliever Rosey Ryan. He did end up winning a coveted ring.

He spent one more season in New York in 1924, playing about as much and performing about as well as he did the year before. The Yanks released him after that second season and he ended up with the Indians in 1925 and back in the minors in ’26. He got his break in 1927 when he became an often-used utility player for a pretty bad Brooklyn Robins team. For the next three seasons he averaged 120 games played and over 400 at bats playing some outfield, some third base and some first base for Brooklyn. He averaged over .300 in each of those seasons including a career high .354 in 1929.

The Robins traded Hendrick to Cincinnati at the start of the 1931 regular season and he would later also play for the Cardinals and Phillies before his big league career ended in 1936. Evidently, Hendrick struggled in life after his playing days were over because in 1941 he committed suicide by shooting himself in his Covington, Tennessee home. Other former Yankees who have taken their own lives include; Dan McGann, Jake Powell, Hugh Casey and most recently, Hideki Irabu.

Hendrick shares a birthday with this one-time Yankee second baseman and this former Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1923 NYY 37 69 66 9 18 3 1 3 12 3 2 8 .273 .294 .485 .779
1924 NYY 40 80 76 7 20 0 0 1 11 1 2 7 .263 .291 .303 .594
11 Yrs 922 3219 2910 434 896 157 46 48 413 75 239 243 .308 .364 .443 .807
BRO (5 yrs) 433 1604 1435 236 456 68 28 34 219 61 129 113 .318 .378 .475 .853
CIN (2 yrs) 231 1021 928 130 287 62 12 5 115 6 76 69 .309 .363 .418 .782
NYY (2 yrs) 77 149 142 16 38 3 1 4 23 4 4 15 .268 .293 .387 .680
PHI (1 yr) 59 127 116 12 34 8 0 0 19 0 9 15 .293 .344 .362 .706
STL (1 yr) 28 77 72 8 18 2 0 1 5 0 5 9 .250 .299 .319 .618
CHC (1 yr) 69 208 189 30 55 13 3 4 23 4 13 17 .291 .346 .455 .801
CLE (1 yr) 25 33 28 2 8 1 2 0 9 0 3 5 .286 .355 .464 .819
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/9/2013.

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