November 2013

November 30 – Happy Birthday Matt Lawton

LawtonMarcus was the first of the two Lawton brothers to make it to the big leagues but it was younger brother Matt who became an All Star. Marcus Lawton made his ten-game Major League debut as a Yankee during the 1989 season and then never played another game in the big leagues. What he did too was spend lots of time with his younger sibling teaching him everything he knew about the game. The lessons paid off.

Matt Lawton enjoyed a solid twelve season career, with his best years coming  with the Twins and the Indians. He was an AL All Star with Minnesota in 2000 and again with Cleveland in 2004. The Yankees got him in a late August trade with the Cubs in 2005, just a few days after Hurricane Katrina demolished Lawton’s hometown of Gulfport,Mississippi and did severe damage to the outfielder’s home. He got off to a horribly slow start with New York but on September 21 of that season, he hit a huge 2-run home run that beat the Orioles and propelled the Yankees into first place.

During Lawton’s short time as a Yankee he tested positive for steroids and immediately admitted he took the drug and apologized. The Yanks released him in late October  He then signed with Seattle and after serving a ten-game suspension at the beginning of the 2006 season, he lasted just two months with  the Mariners, before hanging up his glove for good.

Lawton shares his birthday with this former Yankee starting pitcher and this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2005 NYY 21 57 48 6 6 0 0 2 4 1 7 8 .125 .263 .250 .513
12 Yrs 1334 5570 4763 756 1273 267 17 138 631 165 681 613 .267 .368 .417 .785
MIN (7 yrs) 771 3150 2672 423 739 163 13 72 384 96 408 335 .277 .379 .428 .808
CLE (3 yrs) 363 1593 1381 237 355 63 2 50 180 41 180 165 .257 .352 .414 .767
NYM (1 yr) 48 213 183 24 45 11 1 3 13 10 22 34 .246 .352 .366 .718
PIT (1 yr) 101 445 374 53 102 28 1 10 44 16 58 61 .273 .380 .433 .813
CHC (1 yr) 19 83 78 8 19 2 0 1 5 1 4 8 .244 .289 .308 .597
SEA (1 yr) 11 29 27 5 7 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 .259 .310 .259 .570
NYY (1 yr) 21 57 48 6 6 0 0 2 4 1 7 8 .125 .263 .250 .513
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/30/2013.

November 29 – Happy Birthday Mariano Rivera

rivera

The best closer ever. Those really are the only four words you need to describe “Mo’s” career with the Yankees. In my fifty-plus years of being an avid Major League baseball fan, I’ve seen nobody end games as successfully as this guy did for the past nineteen seasons. And the amazing thing is that he did it with one pitch, a cut fastball. Yankee fans watched Rivera’s cutter break a remarkable number of big league bats over the years. The pitch had such late and significant movement that it was almost impossible for even the most skilled big league hitters to get the meaty part of their bat on the ball. I heard Jim Kaat try to explain it years ago during one Yankee broadcast by telling viewers that Mariano had very long fingers, which helped him get more spin on the cutter than most other pitchers who threw it. Add in his flawless mechanics which enabled him to precisely replicate his elegant delivery pitch after pitch and you have the formula for closing perfection that danced to the tune of “Enter Sandman.”

When I think of Mariano I will remember his postseason brilliance which included 42 saves, an 8-1 record  and an ERA of 0.70. I will remember him setting the MLB career saves record during the 2011 season. I will remember how he returned from an ACL tear at the age of 43 and went on to save 44 games during the final year of his Hall of Fame career. But most of all, I will remember how secure every Yankee lead seemed to be at the end of the eighth inning for almost two straight decades and how comforting it was as a Yankee fan to see that bullpen door swing open and see number 42 trot in to that elevated circular spot in the middle of the infield from where he performed his magic.

Thank you Mariano Rivera. Yankee fans will never ever forget just how magnificent you were.

This former Yankee outfielder, this former Yankee DH and this one-time Yankee phee-nom share Rivera’s November 29th birthday.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1995 NYY 5 3 .625 5.51 19 10 2 0 0 0 67.0 71 43 41 11 30 51 1.507
1996 NYY 8 3 .727 2.09 61 0 14 0 0 5 107.2 73 25 25 1 34 130 0.994
1997 NYY 6 4 .600 1.88 66 0 56 0 0 43 71.2 65 17 15 5 20 68 1.186
1998 NYY 3 0 1.000 1.91 54 0 49 0 0 36 61.1 48 13 13 3 17 36 1.060
1999 NYY 4 3 .571 1.83 66 0 63 0 0 45 69.0 43 15 14 2 18 52 0.884
2000 NYY 7 4 .636 2.85 66 0 61 0 0 36 75.2 58 26 24 4 25 58 1.097
2001 NYY 4 6 .400 2.34 71 0 66 0 0 50 80.2 61 24 21 5 12 83 0.905
2002 NYY 1 4 .200 2.74 45 0 37 0 0 28 46.0 35 16 14 3 11 41 1.000
2003 NYY 5 2 .714 1.66 64 0 57 0 0 40 70.2 61 15 13 3 10 63 1.005
2004 NYY 4 2 .667 1.94 74 0 69 0 0 53 78.2 65 17 17 3 20 66 1.081
2005 NYY 7 4 .636 1.38 71 0 67 0 0 43 78.1 50 18 12 2 18 80 0.868
2006 NYY 5 5 .500 1.80 63 0 59 0 0 34 75.0 61 16 15 3 11 55 0.960
2007 NYY 3 4 .429 3.15 67 0 59 0 0 30 71.1 68 25 25 4 12 74 1.121
2008 NYY 6 5 .545 1.40 64 0 60 0 0 39 70.2 41 11 11 4 6 77 0.665
2009 NYY 3 3 .500 1.76 66 0 55 0 0 44 66.1 48 14 13 7 12 72 0.905
2010 NYY 3 3 .500 1.80 61 0 55 0 0 33 60.0 39 14 12 2 11 45 0.833
2011 NYY 1 2 .333 1.91 64 0 54 0 0 44 61.1 47 13 13 3 8 60 0.897
2012 NYY 1 1 .500 2.16 9 0 9 0 0 5 8.1 6 2 2 0 2 8 0.960
2013 NYY 6 2 .750 2.11 64 0 60 0 0 44 64.0 58 16 15 6 9 54 1.047
19 Yrs 82 60 .577 2.21 1115 10 952 0 0 652 1283.2 998 340 315 71 286 1173 1.000
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/28/2013.

November 28 – Happy Birthday Roxey Roach

Roach2His real name was Wilbur Roach, but he eventually became known better by the nickname “Roxey.” A native Pennsylvanian, Roach seems to have also been a pretty astute businessman and before Ted Williams came along, perhaps the the best fly-fishing ball player ever born.

He started playing minor league ball in 1906, when he was already 23-years-old. He made his big league debut with the 1910 New York Highlanders, a surprisingly good team that would finish 25 games over five hundred that season. That was only good enough for second place, far behind the powerful A’s of Connie Mack.

George Stallings was the skipper of that Highlander ball club and he might have thought Roach had a decent shot at unseating New York’s starting shortstop at the time, the light-hitting John Knight. Roxey appeared in 70 games that year but hit just .214. Mean whiile, Knight had an offensive epiphany, finishing the 1910 season with a .312 batting average, which was about 100 points higher than his lifetime average had been up to that point.

Getting outplayed by Knight was not the only disruption that occurred in Roach’s career that year. George Stallings had suspected that New York’s starting first baseman, Hal Chase was involved with professional gamblers and was throwing games. When he became convinced his suspicions were true, he went to both the League President and the Highlanders’ ownership and demanded Chase be banned. Instead, the team’s owners, who happened to be big gamblers themselves, not only sided with Chase, they fired Stallings and made the first baseman the team’s new manager.

After appearing in just 13 games for New York in 1911, Roach’s contract was sold to a minor league team. Since he owned both a pool hall and a bowling alley back home in Pennsylvania, Roach didn’t need his baseball salary to survive but he kept playing minor league ball and in 1915 signed a contract to play for the International League’s Toronto Maple Leafs. At midseason, however, the Buffalo franchise of the upstart Federal League offered him $1,000 more than the Leafs were paying him and he jumped the team to take the raise.

Roxey's Gray Squirrel Tail

Roxey’s Gray Squirrel Tail

When the Federal League folded, Roach continued playing minor league ball, this time in Louisville. He also continued pursuing his favorite sports, which were fly fishing and hunting. Earlier in his career, he had purchased some land in Michigan to serve as his private fish and game preserve. He moved up there, opened a Ford dealership and pursued his passions. It seems that he was also one of the great fly tiers of all time. Known as “patterns” in the sport, Roxey’s Fox Squirrel Tail and Gray Squirrel Tail fly patterns have become famous worldwide among fly fisherman and are still replicated today.

Roxey was also proficient in another area as well. He fathered 14 children. He suffered a fatal heart attack the day after Christmas in 1947.

Roxey shares his birthday with this former Yankee closer and this one-time Yankee phee-nom.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1910 NYY 70 260 220 27 47 9 2 0 20 15 29 34 .214 .313 .273 .586
1911 NYY 13 48 40 4 10 2 1 0 2 0 6 5 .250 .348 .350 .698
4 Yrs 177 680 608 67 151 31 6 3 54 26 52 73 .248 .311 .334 .645
NYY (2 yrs) 83 308 260 31 57 11 3 0 22 15 35 39 .219 .319 .285 .603
WSH (1 yr) 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 .500 .500 2.000 2.500
BUF (1 yr) 92 370 346 35 93 20 3 2 31 11 17 34 .269 .303 .361 .664
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/28/2013.

November 27 – Happy Birthday Bill Short

ShortBorn in Kingston, NY and raised in nearby Newburgh, Bill Short was a five foot nine inch southpaw signed by the Yankees right out of high school in 1955. He spent the next five years climbing up the alphabetized ladder of New York’s farm system. At triple A Richmond in 1959, he became a genuine top prospect when he put together a 17-6 record, a 2.48 ERA and captured the league’s pitcher of the year honors.

By the time the Yankees 1960 spring training camp opened, Casey Stengel was ready for Short to prove he had good enough stuff to crack the parent club’s starting rotation. Short pitched well enough to make the team and after his first four regular season starts, he had a 2-1 record and despite an alarming number of bases on balls, a sparkling ERA of just 2.25. But he couldn’t keep it up.

Ironically as his walks went down his ERA went up and he lost his next three starts. He also lost his spot in both the rotation and on the Yankee roster, getting sent back down to the minors to try and get it back together. He spent the rest of his only Yankee season bouncing back and forth between Richmond and the Bronx and he was left off New York’s 1960 World Series roster.

Short then spent the entire 1961 season in Richmond and when the Yankees did not protect him, Baltimore claimed him in the Rule 5 Draft. He did get back to the big leagues, first with the Orioles and later with the Red Sox, Pirates, Mets and Reds, making his final big league appearance in 1969. Never a star at the top-level, Short won 120 games in the minors and is a member of the International League Hall of Fame.

He shares a birthday with this long-ago Yankee pitcher and this much more recent Yankee catcher.

Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1960 22 NYY AL 3 5 .375 4.79 10 10 0 2 0 0 47.0 49 25 25 5 30 14 1.681
6 Yrs 5 11 .313 4.73 73 16 16 3 1 2 131.1 130 75 69 8 64 71 1.477
BAL (2 yrs) 2 3 .400 4.10 11 6 1 1 1 0 41.2 42 22 19 2 16 30 1.392
NYM (1 yr) 0 3 .000 4.85 34 0 13 0 0 1 29.2 24 17 16 0 14 24 1.281
PIT (1 yr) 0 0 3.86 6 0 1 0 0 1 2.1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0.857
BOS (1 yr) 0 0 4.32 8 0 0 0 0 0 8.1 10 6 4 1 2 2 1.440
CIN (1 yr) 0 0 15.43 4 0 1 0 0 0 2.1 4 4 4 0 1 0 2.143
NYY (1 yr) 3 5 .375 4.79 10 10 0 2 0 0 47.0 49 25 25 5 30 14 1.681
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/26/2013.

November 26 – Happy Birthday Sam Militello

MilitelloBy 1992, even the most loyal and optimistic Yankee fans were wondering if our favorite baseball team would ever be winners again. George Steinbrenner had gotten himself suspended for life but not before he presided over the disembowelment of his ball club. The Stump Merrill era had just ended and somebody named Buck Showalter was now skippering the club.

Melido Perez was the ace of Buck’s pitching staff that year,which should tell you just how bad that staff was. It was clear to me that if the Yankees were ever going to be contenders again, the team had to find some special arms.

That’s why we all got pretty excited when today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant showed up in the Bronx during the dog days of August that year. A native of Tampa, Sam Militello was a tall fireballing right-hander  who had just won two consecutive pitcher of the year awards in the Yankee farm system. When he won his first three big league decisions the immediate reaction of Yankee Universe was not just joy but also “where the hell have they been hiding this kid and why?”

Unfortunately, Militello’s brilliance did not last. He lost his next three decisions and was then shelved for the remainder of the ’92 season with a tired arm. He bounced back with a strong spring training performance and the Yanks brought him north to start the ’93 season. After his first three regular season appearances however, his ERA was near seven and he couldn’t get the ball over the plate. The Yanks sent him down at the end of April. It was his inability to throw strikes and a series of arm injuries that prevented Militello from ever again throwing a pitch in the big leagues.

He shares his birthday with this Yankee Hall of Famer, this former starting pitcher and this one-time Yankee reliever.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1992 NYY 3 3 .500 3.45 9 9 0 0 0 0 60.0 43 24 23 6 32 42 1.250
1993 NYY 1 1 .500 6.75 3 2 0 0 0 0 9.1 10 8 7 1 7 5 1.821
2 Yrs 4 4 .500 3.89 12 11 0 0 0 0 69.1 53 32 30 7 39 47 1.327
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/25/2013.

November 25 – Happy Birthday Mark Whiten

MWhiten“Hard Hittin” Mark Whiten had his career year in 1993. On the final day of spring training that season, this then, 25-year-old, switch-hitting native of Pensacola, FL was traded by the Cleveland Indians to the Cardinals. He joined a starting outfield in St.Louis that included Bernard Gilkey and Ray Lankford and he led that team with 25 home runs and 99 RBIs. On September 7, 1993 he made baseball history by smashing 4 home runs and driving in 12 runs in a single game.

The Players Strike disrupted Whiten’s second season with the Cards and there would be no third. He was traded to Boston at the start of the ’95 season, which began an odyssey that would put the outfielder in six different big league uniforms over the next four years. The fifth of those uniforms was pinstriped. The Yankees signed Whiten as a free agent in January of 1997. In New York, he was reunited with Joe Torre, the same guy who managed him during his career year with the Cardinals.

Torre began the season by platooning Whiten and Darryl Strawberry in left field. Big Mark got off to a great start at the plate and was still hitting over .300 the first week of June. But when Strawberry went down with a bad knee, it would be Tim Raines who took over as the team’s starter in left. Whiten was left to battle Chad Curtis for the fourth outfielder’s slot and when Curtis won that battle, the Yanks released Whiten that August. He then signed on with Cleveland and appeared in his last big league game as an Indian in 2000.

Whiten shares his November 25th birthday with this former Yankee infielder, this recent Yankee outfielder and  this Hall-of-Fame Yankee center fielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1997 NYY 69 248 215 34 57 11 0 5 24 4 30 47 .265 .360 .386 .746
11 Yrs 940 3523 3104 465 804 129 20 105 423 78 378 712 .259 .341 .415 .756
CLE (5 yrs) 320 1167 1024 142 265 49 8 23 103 22 126 218 .259 .343 .390 .732
PHI (2 yrs) 120 461 394 71 100 18 1 18 58 20 64 125 .254 .361 .442 .802
STL (2 yrs) 244 1000 896 138 240 31 6 39 152 25 95 185 .268 .338 .446 .784
TOR (2 yrs) 79 260 237 24 57 5 4 4 26 2 18 49 .241 .292 .346 .638
ATL (1 yr) 36 107 90 12 23 5 1 3 17 2 16 25 .256 .364 .433 .798
BOS (1 yr) 32 117 108 13 20 3 0 1 10 1 8 23 .185 .239 .241 .480
NYY (1 yr) 69 248 215 34 57 11 0 5 24 4 30 47 .265 .360 .386 .746
SEA (1 yr) 40 163 140 31 42 7 0 12 33 2 21 40 .300 .399 .607 1.006
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/24/2013.

November 24 – Happy Birthday Bob Friend

Strangely, Bob Friend almost helped the Yankees win the 1960 World Series. I use the word strangely because Friend did not become a Yankee until 1965. At the time of the ’60 Fall Classic he was still the ace of the Pittsburgh Pirates’ staff, who had won 18 games during that regular season and would end up winning 192 decisions before being traded by the Bucs to New York for reliever Pete Mikkelsen. The veteran right-hander, who was nicknamed “The Warrior,” started the second and sixth games of the Series and was plastered by the very talented Yankee lineup. Friend pitched a total of just six innings in those two appearances, surrendering thirteen hits and nine earned runs in the process. He would never again pitch in the postseason. When he started his one and only season in pinstripes losing four of his first five decisions, the Yankees sold him to the Mets. The Lafayette, IN native finished that season with a 5-8 record for the Amazin’s and then retired.

Another Yankee born on today’s date was this popular infielder with Hollywood good looks and this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1966 NYY 1 4 .200 4.84 12 8 2 0 0 0 44.2 61 25 24 2 9 22 1.567
16 Yrs 197 230 .461 3.58 602 497 56 163 36 11 3611.0 3772 1652 1438 286 894 1734 1.292
PIT (15 yrs) 191 218 .467 3.55 568 477 46 161 35 10 3480.1 3610 1575 1372 273 869 1682 1.287
NYM (1 yr) 5 8 .385 4.40 22 12 8 2 1 1 86.0 101 52 42 11 16 30 1.360
NYY (1 yr) 1 4 .200 4.84 12 8 2 0 0 0 44.2 61 25 24 2 9 22 1.567
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/24/2013.

November 23 – Happy Birthday Dale Sveum

sveumBorn in Richmond, CA, Dale Sveum was the Milwaukee Brewers’ first round draft choice in 1982 and considered to be the heir apparent to the great Robin Yount. By 1987, in just his second year in the big leagues, the 23-year-old switch hitter blasted 25 home runs and drove in 95 as Milwaukee’s starting shortstop. He would continue playing through 1999 and never again come close to matching either of those numbers.

The Brewers gave up on him after the 1991 season and traded him to the Phillies. During the next five years he played for five different teams. The Yankees signed him as a free agent in November of 1997 and the following April, he was on the Opening Day roster of a Yankee team that was about to win more regular season games than any team in franchise history. Sveum spelled Tino Martinez at first base plus saw some occasional time at the hot corner. What he didn’t do was hit. At the All Star break his average was just .155 and the Yanks gave him his walking papers.

After an unsuccessful comeback try with the Pirates the following year, his big league career was over. He got into coaching and in 2008, he became the interim manager of the Brewers for the last 12 games of the season. In 2012, Theo Epstein hired Sveum to manage the Chicago Cubs. Epstein himself had just been hired as the team’s president and given free reign to rebuild the organization from the bottom up. He had chosen Sveum as the new skipper because his plan was to bring Chicago’s best prospects up and play them. That required a manager who could communicate with and develop young talent and Epstein felt those were Sveum’s greatest strengths. Unfortunately, after two years of putting this plan in action, the performances of the Cub prospects had regressed. When Epstein fired Sveum the day after the 2013 regular season ended, he absolved his departing skipper for the failure of those prospects to develop, inferring that the organization may have simply overestimated their abilities.

This former Yankee starting pitcher and this one too were also born on November 23rd as was this one-time Yankee first base prospect.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1998 NYY 30 64 58 6 9 0 0 0 3 0 4 16 .155 .203 .155 .358
12 Yrs 862 2810 2526 305 597 125 13 69 340 10 227 656 .236 .298 .378 .676
MIL (5 yrs) 511 1878 1702 210 413 80 10 46 236 9 137 426 .243 .299 .382 .681
PIT (3 yrs) 187 459 411 46 107 30 2 16 65 0 40 115 .260 .324 .460 .784
PHI (1 yr) 54 153 135 13 24 4 0 2 16 0 16 39 .178 .261 .252 .513
OAK (1 yr) 30 96 79 12 14 2 1 2 6 0 16 21 .177 .316 .304 .620
NYY (1 yr) 30 64 58 6 9 0 0 0 3 0 4 16 .155 .203 .155 .358
SEA (1 yr) 10 29 27 3 5 0 0 1 2 0 2 10 .185 .241 .296 .538
CHW (1 yr) 40 131 114 15 25 9 0 2 12 1 12 29 .219 .287 .351 .638
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.

November 22 – Happy Birthday Rich McKinney

mckinneyThough the transaction took place over four decades ago, I know I screamed in anguish when I heard about the trade. Three weeks before Christmas in 1971, the Yankees sent their 1968 Rookie-of-the-Year-winning right-hander, Stan Bahnsen to the Chicago White Sox. They took a guy who had won the impressive total of 55 games for some mediocre New York teams during the previous four seasons and sent him to the Windy City in exchange for a 25-year-old utility infielder named Rich McKinney.

I knew what Yankee skipper Ralph Houk and the team’s GM, Lee MacPhail were thinking when they pulled the trigger on that one. New York desperately needed a good starting third baseman. They hadn’t had one since they traded Clete Boyer to the Braves in 1966.

McKinney, a native of Piqua, OH, had been in the big leagues for just two seasons and was coming off a decent year in which he had averaged .271 in 114 games as Chicago’s primary utility infielder. There was nothing in his resume that indicated he was going to be anything special, but after trying to win with guys like Charley Smith and Jerry Kenney at the hot corner, Houk and MacPhail figured this kid was worth a shot. But he wasn’t worth Stan Bahnsen!

The veteran right-hander took his “Bahnsen Burner” to Comiskey Park and won 21 games in 1972. Meanwhile, McKinney was a complete bust in the Bronx. He started out slow and never got better. By June he was playing down in Syracuse and the Yanks were using the infamous Celerino Sanchez as their starter at third. That November, McKinney’s Yankee career ended, when he was traded to Oakland in the deal that brought Matty Alou to New York.

This hitting star of the 1998 World Series, this former Yankee shortstop, this long-ago Yankee pitching prospect and this current Yankee catcher all share McKinney’s November 22nd birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1972 NYY 37 128 121 10 26 2 0 1 7 1 7 13 .215 .258 .256 .514
7 Yrs 341 980 886 79 199 28 2 20 100 4 77 124 .225 .286 .328 .615
OAK (4 yrs) 147 306 277 22 53 10 0 7 30 0 24 49 .191 .252 .303 .556
CHW (2 yrs) 157 546 488 47 120 16 2 12 63 3 46 62 .246 .312 .361 .672
NYY (1 yr) 37 128 121 10 26 2 0 1 7 1 7 13 .215 .258 .256 .514
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.

November 21 – Happy Birthday Todd Erdos

The only member of the Yankee All-Time roster I came across, who was born on November 21 is this right handed reliever who pitched in a total of 20 games for New York during the 1998, ’99 and 2000 seasons. He recorded just one save in pinstripes during that time and had an ERA that exceed five runs for every nine innings pitched. The 1998 trade that brought Erdos to New York from the Arizona Diamondbacks was the same one that ended Andy Fox’s Yankee career. I happened to be a huge Andy Fox fan. Why? Because Andy was a member of the last Albany Colonie Yankee Team in the Double A Eastern league. That was 1994 and the following season, the Yankees switched their Double A affiliation to Greenwich, CT. The Albany ballpark was just a half-hour’s drive from my home in upstate New York. Me and my kids got to see some great future Yankees play in Albany from some very very good seats. In addition to Fox, that team’s final roster for that 1994 season included Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte and Mo Rivera. Erdos is one of two Major League pitchers to be born in Washington, PA. The other one was also a relief pitcher for the Yankees by the name of Joe Verbanic.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1998 NYY 0 0 9.00 2 0 1 0 0 0 2.0 5 2 2 0 1 0 3.000
1999 NYY 0 0 3.86 4 0 1 0 0 0 7.0 5 4 3 2 4 4 1.286
2000 NYY 0 0 5.04 14 0 6 0 0 1 25.0 31 14 14 2 11 18 1.680
5 Yrs 2 0 1.000 5.57 63 0 21 0 0 2 93.2 105 62 58 12 45 58 1.601
NYY (3 yrs) 0 0 5.03 20 0 8 0 0 1 34.0 41 20 19 4 16 22 1.676
SDP (2 yrs) 2 0 1.000 6.23 33 0 10 0 0 1 43.1 49 33 30 6 21 29 1.615
BOS (1 yr) 0 0 4.96 10 0 3 0 0 0 16.1 15 9 9 2 8 7 1.408
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/21/2013.