October 2013

October 22 – Happy Birthday Myles Thomas

thomasThe article appeared in the New York Times on December 17, 1925. It started out like this; “Good news for Yankee fans. Miller Huggins announced yesterday the purchase of one the best minor league pitchers in the country, a young man named Myles Thomas…” The article went on to say that the purchase had forced Jake Ruppert, the Yankee owner then, to “remove several layers from his bankroll to get this lad” because there were several big league teams interested in the right-hander from College Station, Pennsylvania. The reason for all the attention on Myles Thomas was the 28-8 record he had put together during the 1925 season, while pitching for the double A International League’s Toronto Maple Leafs.

Ironically, Huggins had been given a chance to sign this same guy in 1921, when he was fresh out of Pennsylvania State Teachers College. The Yankee skipper passed on that first opportunity and Thomas had then spent the next six seasons pitching in the minors. So he was already 28 years-old when he made his big-league debut with the 1926 Yankees, but he couldn’t have picked a better time to come to the Bronx. During his three full seasons on the team, the Yankees won three straight AL Pennants and both the 1927 and ’28 World Series.

Thomas’s best season in pinstripes was his second, when he went 7-4 for the Murderers’ Row team that went 110-44 and swept the Pirates in the ’27 World Series. But Huggins gradually lost faith in him as time went on. The pitcher’s starts and appearances out of the bullpen decreased in each of his successive seasons with New York until he was finally put on waivers and sold to the Senators in late June of 1929.

He pitched a couple of seasons in Washington before going back to the minors, where after hanging up his glove, he eventually became a coach with the Toledo Mud Hens. I can picture Thomas, perhaps wearing one of the World Series rings he won with the Yankees, out in the Mud Hens bullpen during a game, surrounded by a bunch of wide-eyed big-leaguer wannabe’s, regaling them with his memories of pitching for one of the greatest teams in big league history. I wonder if he told those kids that Babe Ruth himself had given Thomas the nickname of “Duck Eye.” Of course, the Bambino gave just about every teammate he ever played with a nickname because he was too self-absorbed to bother remembering their real names. In fact, in 1928, after Thomas had been Ruth’s teammate for more than two years. Yankee second baseman Tony Lazzeri introduced him to Ruth in a Boston hotel lobby as “the new pitcher from Yale the Yanks had just signed.” Ruth stuck out his hand and said “Hi ya keed.”

Thomas shares his birthday with baseball’s best all-around second baseman and a player who has a decent chance of becoming the first Japanese-born member of the Hall-of-Fame.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1926 NYY 6 6 .500 4.23 33 13 7 3 0 0 140.1 140 79 66 6 65 38 1.461
1927 NYY 7 4 .636 4.87 21 9 8 1 0 0 88.2 111 58 48 4 43 25 1.737
1928 NYY 1 0 1.000 3.41 12 1 6 0 0 0 31.2 33 19 12 3 9 10 1.326
1929 NYY 0 2 .000 10.80 5 1 1 0 0 0 15.0 27 21 18 0 9 3 2.400
5 Yrs 23 22 .511 4.64 105 40 33 11 0 2 434.2 499 284 224 19 189 121 1.583
NYY (4 yrs) 14 12 .538 4.70 71 24 22 4 0 0 275.2 311 177 144 13 126 76 1.585
WSH (2 yrs) 9 10 .474 4.53 34 16 11 7 0 2 159.0 188 107 80 6 63 45 1.579
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/22/2013.

October 21 – Happy Birthday John Flaherty

Flash.FlahertyFlash turns 46 years old today. Before he joined the YES Network as an analyst for Yankee games and as a commentator on the Post Game shows, Flaherty was a big league catcher for fourteen seasons with five different teams. Born in the Big Apple, he ended that playing career in his hometown, with three seasons as Jorge Posada’s backup from 2003 until 2005. During lulls in the action, when he is in the booth for Yankee games, viewers often hear Michael Kay or Kenny Singleton tease Flaherty about the lucrative contract he signed with Tampa Bay, back in 1998. He pocketed about $12 million of Devil Ray money during his five season stay for catching about 90 games per year and averaging .252. He hit just .226 during his 134-game career in pinstripes but he’s doing a much better job for New York in his broadcasting role.

In 2011, Flaherty became an owner of a professional baseball team, when he founded the Rockland Boulders, a member of the unaffiliated Canadian-American League. The team is based in Rockland County, NY.

Like Flaherty, this Yankee was born in New York City and celebrates his birthday on this date. He did a bit better than John did while playing in New York and now has a plaque in Cooperstown. Also born on October 21st is this former Yankee pitcher who flirted with World Series history in 1947.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2003 NYY 40 116 105 16 28 8 0 4 14 0 4 19 .267 .297 .457 .754
2004 NYY 47 135 127 11 32 9 0 6 16 0 5 25 .252 .286 .465 .750
2005 NYY 47 138 127 10 21 5 0 2 11 0 6 26 .165 .206 .252 .458
14 Yrs 1047 3640 3372 319 849 176 3 80 395 10 175 514 .252 .290 .377 .667
TBD (5 yrs) 471 1802 1673 157 422 82 1 35 196 3 86 250 .252 .289 .365 .654
NYY (3 yrs) 134 389 359 37 81 22 0 12 41 0 15 70 .226 .261 .387 .648
DET (3 yrs) 193 594 546 59 130 35 1 15 67 1 27 83 .238 .277 .388 .665
BOS (2 yrs) 48 100 91 6 16 4 0 0 4 0 5 13 .176 .224 .220 .444
SDP (2 yrs) 201 755 703 60 200 33 1 18 87 6 42 98 .284 .324 .411 .736
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/21/2013.

October 20 – Happy Birthday Dave Collins

The Yankees 1981 World Series defeat to the Dodgers was an almost tragic turning point for George Steinbrenner. He had spent loads of Yankee dollars to put together an offense that was driven by home runs only to see that offense sputter and fail in both the second half of the strike-induced split season and the last four games with Los Angeles.  He then seemed to have let his anger over the strike and the pain of that Dodger defeat drive a series of player decisions that would keep the Yankees out of postseason play for the next fifteen years. No move symbolized Steinbrenner’s inept over-reaction more than the signing of Dave Collins.

At the time, Collins was a singles-hitting, base-stealing outfielder who slap-swung his bat from both sides of the plate. He had hit .300 for the Reds in both 1979 and ’80 but what really captured the Boss’s attention was the 79 bases Collins stole during that 1980 season. Steinbrenner was convinced the guy would be a perfect lead-off man for the new small-ball offense he envisioned for his ball club so he blew him over with a three-year, two-and-a-half million dollar free agent offer that was probably twice as much and at least a year-more than any other team would have offered Collins.

A month before that signing the Boss had approved a trade for Collins’ Cincinnati teammate and fellow outfielder, Ken Griffey. Then just before spring training, Steinbrenner must have been feeling sentimental because he gave both Lou Piniella and Bobby Murcer, two more outfielders, three-year contract extensions. The Yankees also already had Dave Winfield, Jerry Mumphrey and Oscar Gamble under contract for the 1982 season. That added up to seven outfielders which didn’t add up to a very confused Bob Lemon, who as Yankee manager was given the responsibility of figuring out where and when to play all of them. When Collins reported to spring training, Lemon told him to work out at first base. As Bill Madden explained the situation in his excellent biography of Steinbrenner, “The Last Lion of Baseball,” Collins spent all that spring asking every reporter who covered the team “Why in the world did they sign me?”

He ended up playing first base in 52 games for New York and split 60 more pretty evenly as the Yankee left, right, and center fielder. He hit just .253 that year, stole only 13 bases and was probably one of the most uncomfortable Yankee players in the history of the franchise. Steinbrenner’s 1982 small ball Yankees finished the season next-to-last in their division with a 79-83 record. New York then mercifully traded Collins to the Blue Jays, where, feeling much more wanted, he averaged .290 and 50 stolen bases during the final two years of the contract he had originally signed with New York. But just to make Steinbrenner regret his signing of Collins even more, the Blue jays insisted that the Yankees include a youngster named Fred McGriff in the trade for Collins

October 20th is also the birthday of “the Commerce Comet” “the Voice of the Yankees” and this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1982 NYY 111 393 348 41 88 12 3 3 25 13 28 49 .253 .315 .330 .646
16 Yrs 1701 5507 4907 667 1335 187 52 32 373 395 467 660 .272 .338 .351 .689
CIN (7 yrs) 697 1981 1774 272 504 70 16 9 126 147 168 231 .284 .349 .357 .706
CAL (2 yrs) 192 775 684 86 181 25 5 7 57 56 76 110 .265 .337 .346 .684
TOR (2 yrs) 246 943 843 114 245 36 19 3 78 91 76 108 .291 .355 .389 .744
STL (1 yr) 99 74 58 12 13 1 0 0 3 7 13 10 .224 .366 .241 .608
OAK (1 yr) 112 418 379 52 95 16 4 4 29 29 29 37 .251 .303 .346 .648
NYY (1 yr) 111 393 348 41 88 12 3 3 25 13 28 49 .253 .315 .330 .646
SEA (1 yr) 120 447 402 46 96 9 3 5 28 25 33 66 .239 .299 .313 .613
DET (1 yr) 124 476 419 44 113 18 2 1 27 27 44 49 .270 .340 .329 .670
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/20/2013.

October 19 – Happy Birthday Sandy Alomar Sr.

The 1974 Yankees opened up their season with a double play combination of Gene Michael at second and Jim Mason at shortstop. Decent defensively, new Yankee skipper, Bill Virdon batted the two switch-hitters eighth and ninth respectively because both men were pretty putrid hitters from both sides of the plate. In an effort to get some more offense from their infield, the Yankees acquired a guy named Fernando Gonzalez from the Royals to play second. He responded by hitting .215 that year. Then just before that season’s trading deadline, the Yankee front-office went out and purchased Sandy Alomar Sr, who was the starting second baseman for the Angels at the time. Virdon handed him the second baseman’s job and Sandy responded well by hitting .269 during the second half of 1974.

As a Yankee fan back then, I can personally attest to the fact that after watching Mason, Michael and Gonzalez consistently fail to produce at the plate, having Alomar in the lineup was a huge offensive upgrade for that 1974 Yankee team.  Sandy Sr. continued to start at second for New York for the entire 1975 season but his hitting fell off that year, when he averaged just .239. His offensive regression helped convince the Yankees to make the deal with Pittsburgh in December of 1975 that brought Willie Randolph to the Bronx. Alomar  lost his starting job to the more talented youngster in 1976 and was traded to Texas in 1977. His 15-season big-league playing career ended the following year and Alomar then began a long coaching career . Today, Sandy, who was born on October 19, 1943 in Salinas Puerto Rico, is best remembered for being the Dad of former big league All Stars Sandy Jr. and Roberto.

Even the most diehard Yankee fans will have a difficult time remembering this starting pitcher from the 1991 Yankee team who happens to share the senior Alomar’s October 19th birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1974 NYY 76 299 279 35 75 8 0 1 27 6 14 25 .269 .302 .308 .610
1975 NYY 151 528 489 61 117 18 4 2 39 28 26 58 .239 .277 .305 .581
1976 NYY 67 178 163 20 39 4 0 1 10 12 13 12 .239 .295 .282 .578
15 Yrs 1481 5160 4760 558 1168 126 19 13 282 227 302 482 .245 .290 .288 .578
CAL (6 yrs) 795 3314 3054 341 758 79 12 8 162 139 209 280 .248 .296 .290 .585
ATL (3 yrs) 117 214 205 23 43 3 1 0 16 13 5 33 .210 .229 .234 .463
NYY (3 yrs) 294 1005 931 116 231 30 4 4 76 46 53 95 .248 .287 .302 .589
CHW (3 yrs) 167 477 436 53 108 10 2 0 16 25 26 48 .248 .290 .280 .570
TEX (2 yrs) 93 128 112 24 28 4 0 1 12 4 9 20 .250 .309 .313 .621
NYM (1 yr) 15 22 22 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 .000 .000 .000 .000
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/19/2013.

October 18 – Happy Birthday Roy Cullenbine

cullenbineThe next time I hear James Taylor sing “Walking Man,” I’m sure the name of today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant will cross my mind. Roy Cullenbine refused to swing at any pitch that was not in the strike zone. If he played today, he’d probably be an Oakland A and praised profusely in the sports media for his ability to get on base. But Cullenbine played in the 1940’s, during an era when ballplayers were expected to swing their bats at any pitch they could reach and taking too many “walks” was even considered by many to be a sign of laziness. Few paid much attention to on base percentage until Bill James promoted the stat as the sport’s Holy Grail decades later. So when Cullenbine’s OBP reached .477 in 1946, nobody noticed and even though he got on base four out of every ten times he came to the plate the following season and finished second on the Tigers in runs scored, he was still released at the end of the season and forced into retirement.

Cullenbine was born in Tennessee in 1913 but raised in Detroit, where he became a switch-hitting star of the City’s sandlot leagues. The Tigers signed him but then lost him in 1939, when Kenesaw Mountain Landis ruled that Detroit had violated roster manipulation rules and the Commissioner penalized the organization by declaring several of their prized prospects free agents. Cullenbine then signed for a hefty bonus with the Dodgers, got traded to the Browns and in 1942, got traded again, this time to the Senators.

With WWII raging, every big league team was losing players to military service and when Tommy Henrich joined the Coast Guard in August of the 1942 season, Yankee GM Ed Barrow checked the waiver wire to see if he could pick up another outfielder. He found Cullenbine’s name on the list and claimed him on the last day of August.

Since that season’s Yankee team also had George Selkirk on its roster as the fourth outfielder, it wasn’t clear how much playing time Cullenbine would get from New York’s skipper Joe McCarthy. As it turned out, with the Yanks comfortably ahead of the Red Sox in the AL Pennant race at the time, Marse Joe started Cullenbine just about every game down the stretch so he could give his regulars plenty of rest for the postseason.

Cullenbine took advantage of the opportunity by hitting .364 in the 21 games he played in pinstripes that month, while producing a sky-high .484 OBP. That performance guaranteed him a spot on the Yankees World Series roster. He then played in all five games of the 1942 World Series, batting .263 in New York’s losing effort to the Cardinals.

Most Yankee fans and pundits probably expected to see Cullenbine return to the Bronx on Opening Day 1943. But one week before Christmas in 1942, the Yanks traded him and catcher Buddy Rosar to Cleveland for infielder Oscar Grimes and outfielder Roy Weatherly. The “Walking Man” played real well for the Indians the next two seasons and then got traded back to Detroit, where his big league career ended in the same town it began.

Cullenbine passed away in 1991 in Michigan at the age of 77. He still holds the 38th highest MLB career on base percentage. He shares his birthday with this former Yankee third baseman and this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1942 NYY 21 97 77 16 28 7 0 2 17 0 18 2 .364 .484 .532 1.017
10 Yrs 1181 4786 3879 627 1072 209 32 110 599 26 853 399 .276 .408 .432 .840
DET (5 yrs) 501 1952 1561 268 421 76 11 63 259 10 373 164 .270 .412 .454 .865
CLE (3 yrs) 300 1288 1072 167 304 59 9 24 136 7 194 107 .284 .395 .423 .817
SLB (3 yrs) 273 1080 867 138 239 47 12 18 143 6 201 97 .276 .414 .420 .834
WSH (1 yr) 64 285 241 30 69 19 0 2 35 1 44 18 .286 .396 .390 .787
BRO (1 yr) 22 84 61 8 11 1 0 1 9 2 23 11 .180 .405 .246 .651
NYY (1 yr) 21 97 77 16 28 7 0 2 17 0 18 2 .364 .484 .532 1.017
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/18/2013.