October 2013

October 12 – Happy Birthday Tony Kubek

tony.kubekCan you imagine a rookie coming out of the Yankee farm system today and starting 31 regular-season games in right field, 22 in center, 41 at short and 38 more at third base? Then imagine this same 22-year-old kid is able to hit .297 despite all the switching from position to position, wins the Rookie of the Year Award and even hits .286 with two home runs in his very first World Series. I’ve just described Tony Kubek’s very impressive rookie season for the 1957 Yankees. It is no wonder that this native of Milwaukee, who was born on this date in 1935, became one of Casey Stengel’s favorite players. Stengel, after all, was Baseball’s master platooner. In Kubek, he had a very smart, extremely tough kid who had a shotgun for an arm and a very good bat. The only thing he couldn’t do was hit a lot of home runs. Since Stengel wanted outfielders who could hit with power, he gave up playing Tony in the outfield and decided to make him the Yankees’ next shortstop.

That’s where Kubek and Bobby Richardson became the best Yankee double-play combination in my lifetime until Robinson Cano was introduced to Derek Jeter.  Kubek was a three-time All Star and played a total of nine seasons and seven World Series in a Yankee uniform before a bad back hastened his entry into the broadcast booth, where he became one of baseball’s all-time great television analysts. Kubek was the Ford C Frick Award recipient in 2009, putting him the Baseball Hall of Fame for his broadcasting ability.

Kubek shares his October 12th birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this Yankee utility infielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1957 NYY 127 475 431 56 128 21 3 3 39 6 6 24 48 .297 .335 .381 .716
1958 NYY 138 597 559 66 148 21 1 2 48 5 4 25 57 .265 .295 .317 .612
1959 NYY 132 553 512 67 143 25 7 6 51 3 3 24 46 .279 .313 .391 .704
1960 NYY 147 618 568 77 155 25 3 14 62 3 0 31 42 .273 .312 .401 .713
1961 NYY 153 657 617 84 170 38 6 8 46 1 3 27 60 .276 .306 .395 .701
1962 NYY 45 184 169 28 53 6 1 4 17 2 1 12 17 .314 .357 .432 .789
1963 NYY 135 592 557 72 143 21 3 7 44 4 2 28 68 .257 .294 .343 .637
1964 NYY 106 447 415 46 95 16 3 8 31 4 1 26 55 .229 .275 .340 .615
1965 NYY 109 370 339 26 74 5 3 5 35 1 3 20 48 .218 .258 .295 .553
9 Yrs 1092 4493 4167 522 1109 178 30 57 373 29 23 217 441 .266 .303 .364 .667
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/12/2013.

October 11 – Happy Birthday Orlando Hernandez

duqueI loved watching El Duque work on the mound. His ability to throw so many different pitches from that winding and unwinding motion always left me with the impression that he was conducting an orchestra instead of just pitching a baseball game. At least 33 years old when he escaped from Cuba and signed with the Yankees in 1998, his first two seasons in pinstripes were his best, winning 29 games during that span and compiling the first four of what would become eight consecutive postseason wins for New York. I clearly remember always feeling confident the Yankees would do well in any big game with Hernandez as their starting pitcher. Even after his mediocre 2000 regular season, when he finished 12-13, El Duque managed to win three straight starts that postseason.

And after New York traded him in January of 2003, Yankee fans will never forget how Hernandez rejoined the team during the 2004 season and led New York back to the playoffs by winning eight of ten decisions. Then, after spending time with both the White Sox and the Diamondbacks, El Duque joined the Mets during the 2006 season and went 18-12 during his two seasons at Shea. Perhaps if he had escaped from Castro’s Cuba a decade earlier, he would be headed for Cooperstown.

El Duque shares his October 11th birthday with this former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1998 NYY 12 4 .750 3.13 21 21 0 3 1 0 141.0 113 53 49 11 52 131 1.170
1999 NYY 17 9 .654 4.12 33 33 0 2 1 0 214.1 187 108 98 24 87 157 1.278
2000 NYY 12 13 .480 4.51 29 29 0 3 0 0 195.2 186 104 98 34 51 141 1.211
2001 NYY 4 7 .364 4.85 17 16 0 0 0 0 94.2 90 51 51 19 42 77 1.394
2002 NYY 8 5 .615 3.64 24 22 1 0 0 1 146.0 131 63 59 17 36 113 1.144
2004 NYY 8 2 .800 3.30 15 15 0 0 0 0 84.2 73 31 31 9 36 84 1.287
9 Yrs 90 65 .581 4.13 219 211 2 9 2 2 1314.2 1181 641 604 177 479 1086 1.263
NYY (6 yrs) 61 40 .604 3.96 139 136 1 8 2 1 876.1 780 410 386 114 304 703 1.237
NYM (2 yrs) 18 12 .600 3.88 47 44 0 1 0 0 264.1 212 122 114 37 105 240 1.199
ARI (1 yr) 2 4 .333 6.11 9 9 0 0 0 0 45.2 52 32 31 8 20 52 1.577
CHW (1 yr) 9 9 .500 5.12 24 22 1 0 0 1 128.1 137 77 73 18 50 91 1.457
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/11/2013.

October 10 – Happy Birthday Eddie Layton

He was the only person in Yankee franchise history to spend 31 seasons playing in Yankee Stadium without getting an official at bat. Born in Philadelphia on October 10, 1925, Eddie Layton began playing the organ when he was just twelve years old. Five decades later he was spinning tunes for Yankee, Knick and Ranger fans as the official organist at both Yankee Stadium and Madison Square Garden. When CBS purchased the Yankees in the mid sixties, then Yankee President, Mike Burke found Eddie playing organ for CBS daytime soap operas and hired him to play Yankee Stadium’s 50,000 watt Hammond Organ. Layton was not a baseball fan and knew nothing about the game when he accepted the job, but like PA announcer Bob Sheppard and Star Spangled Banner singer Robert Merrill, he became an important part of the Yankee Stadium experience for millions of Bomber fans. Layton died in 2004.The only non-musician Yankee player to celebrate his birthday on this day was this almost unknown reliever.

October 9 – Happy Birthday Joe Pepitone

Joseph Anthony Pepitone was born on October 9, 1940 in Brooklyn. He came up to the Yankees in 1962 and took over the starting first baseman’s job from one of my favorite players in Pinstripes, Bill Moose Skowron. We long-time Yankee FAN-atics will always consider the November 1962 trade that sent Skowron to the Dodgers for pitcher Stan Williams as the first crack in the crumbling of the original Yankee dynasty.

Pepitone may have had better baseball skills than the Moose but he lacked the unselfishness and professional discipline of his Yankee predecessor. Unlike Skowron, who was extremely self-critical, “Pepi” tended to blame his failures on the field on everyone else but himself. He thought he could work hard during the game and play hard at all other times. As the Yankees continued to lose their veteran players to age and injuries, Pepitone’s lack of maturity and good judgment prevented him from filling that growing vacuum in Yankee team leadership.

Still, in 1966 when my beloved Bombers finished in last place in the American League and Mickey Mantle was officially converted from an “injured superstar” into an “aging has-been,” Joe Pepitone’s 31 home run season gave us Yankee fans hope. His graciousness in switching starting positions with the Mick one season later to help prolong Mantle’s career added luster to Pepitone’s Yankee-fan friendly image. By 1969, however, Pepitone’s diminishing batting average and power numbers along with his continuing off-the-field antics had all worn thin on the fans and few complained when Joe was traded to the Astros for a guy named Curt Blefary. In 1975, Pepitone wrote his autobiography with Barry Stainback. It was called “Joe, You Coulda Made Us Proud.” I recommend it to any student of Yankee history and any fan of Pepitone.

Today is also the birthday of another former Yankee infielder named Joe and this up and coming Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1962 NYY 63 141 138 14 33 3 2 7 17 1 3 21 .239 .255 .442 .697
1963 NYY 157 615 580 79 157 16 3 27 89 3 23 63 .271 .304 .448 .752
1964 NYY 160 647 613 71 154 12 3 28 100 2 24 63 .251 .281 .418 .698
1965 NYY 143 580 531 51 131 18 3 18 62 4 43 59 .247 .305 .394 .699
1966 NYY 152 621 585 85 149 21 4 31 83 4 29 58 .255 .290 .463 .753
1967 NYY 133 544 501 45 126 18 3 13 64 1 34 62 .251 .301 .377 .678
1968 NYY 108 421 380 41 93 9 3 15 56 8 37 45 .245 .311 .403 .714
1969 NYY 135 546 513 49 124 16 3 27 70 8 30 42 .242 .284 .442 .726
12 Yrs 1397 5475 5097 606 1315 158 35 219 721 41 302 526 .258 .301 .432 .733
NYY (8 yrs) 1051 4115 3841 435 967 113 24 166 541 31 223 413 .252 .294 .423 .718
CHC (4 yrs) 268 1049 966 127 274 36 6 39 144 5 60 84 .284 .328 .454 .782
ATL (1 yr) 3 12 11 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 .364 .417 .364 .780
HOU (1 yr) 75 299 279 44 70 9 5 14 35 5 18 28 .251 .298 .470 .767
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/9/2013.

October 8 – Happy Birthday Mike Morgan

MorganWhen you charted out Mike Morgan’s big league career it looked like a Vasco de Gama expedition. It began and almost ended when Morgan was just eighteen years old and the property of the irascible owner of the Oakland A’s, Charley Finley. It was 1978 and Finley had mismanaged the A’s World Champion rosters from the early 70′s into distant memories. He was looking for a way to reignite interest in his team and he decided to try and turn his first round draft choice into a teenage phee-nom. The young Morgan, a native of Tulare, California was not up to the task. Though he started strong with a complete game performance in his big league debut against the Orioles, it quickly became apparent the kid was not ready. After going 0-3, he was sent down to the minors, where he should have remained for at least two or three more years. But patience was not one of Finley’s virtues. Morgan was brought back to Oakland the following year and took quite a hammering in the 13 games he appeared.

The Yankees acquired the tall right hander after the 1980 postseason, in exchange for infielder, Fred Stanley. New York pitched Morgan at the double A level for a year and then called him up to the Bronx and made him part of the parent club’s starting rotation, in 1982. He certainly was more ready to face big league hitters as a 22-year-old. His numbers that season weren’t great but there were moments of brilliance that gave the Yankee announcers opportunities to remind listeners of his phee-nom roots and potential. Evidently, the team’s front office wasn’t listening because that December, they sent Morgan, speedy outfielder Dave Collins and future all-star slugger Fred McGriff to the Toronto Blue Jays for a well-traveled reliever named Dale Murray and somebody named Tom Dodd. It would turn out to be a horrible trade by the Yankee front office.

Morgan would go on to pitch 19 more seasons in the Majors and wear the uniforms of ten more big league teams. He would become an All Star with the Dodgers in 1991, set his career-high in wins with 16 a year later while pitching for the Cubs and win a World Series ring with Arizona in2001. He would pitch until 2002, finally hanging up his glove for good at the age of 42.

Morgan shares his birthday with this recent Yankee relieverthis former Yankee outfielder and this one-time Yankee hitting coach.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1982 NYY 7 11 .389 4.37 30 23 2 2 0 0 150.1 167 77 73 15 67 71 1.557
22 Yrs 141 186 .431 4.23 597 411 56 46 10 8 2772.1 2943 1431 1303 270 938 1403 1.400
CHC (5 yrs) 30 35 .462 3.83 90 90 0 8 2 0 575.2 569 274 245 51 212 316 1.357
ARI (3 yrs) 7 6 .538 4.82 120 5 33 0 0 5 173.2 209 97 93 19 66 93 1.583
LAD (3 yrs) 33 36 .478 3.06 107 85 8 11 5 1 600.0 543 236 204 37 154 318 1.162
SEA (3 yrs) 24 35 .407 4.70 73 66 4 17 3 1 429.1 499 247 224 51 144 203 1.498
STL (2 yrs) 9 14 .391 4.55 35 35 0 1 0 0 209.2 232 111 106 24 65 101 1.417
OAK (2 yrs) 2 13 .133 6.12 16 16 0 3 0 0 89.2 121 69 61 8 58 17 1.996
CIN (2 yrs) 11 15 .423 4.42 36 35 0 1 0 0 189.1 193 100 93 15 56 122 1.315
MIN (1 yr) 4 2 .667 3.49 18 17 0 0 0 0 98.0 108 41 38 13 24 50 1.347
TEX (1 yr) 13 10 .565 6.24 34 25 1 1 0 0 140.0 184 108 97 25 48 61 1.657
NYY (1 yr) 7 11 .389 4.37 30 23 2 2 0 0 150.1 167 77 73 15 67 71 1.557
BAL (1 yr) 1 6 .143 5.43 22 10 6 2 0 1 71.1 70 45 43 6 23 29 1.304
TOR (1 yr) 0 3 .000 5.16 16 4 2 0 0 0 45.1 48 26 26 6 21 22 1.522
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/7/2013.

October 7 – Happy Birthday Russ Derry

rDerryThe Yankees signed this Princeton, Missouri native when he was 21-years-old in 1937 and assigned him to their Class C team in Joplin. During his second year with that ball club he popped 24 home runs and got promoted to the Yanks’ Norfolk, Virginia affiliate in the Class B Piedmont League. That’s when and where Derry really raised some eyebrows by belting 40 home runs during the ’39 season.

 Normally, when an organization’s young prospect hits 40 homers at any level it gets him on a pretty fast track to a Major League trial. Unfortunately for this young outfielder, the Yankee team he was trying to make was anything but normal, especially in the outfield. The only outfield problem NY manager Joe McCarthy had to solve each and every game was figuring out who was not going to play. If you got Joe DiMaggio, Charley Selkirk, Tommy Henrich and George Selkirk on your roster, as McCarthy did when Derry hit those 40 homers in the Piedmont league, you’re not going to be too concerned with what your team’s minor league outfielders are doing. So while that 1939 Yankee team led by its glut of All Star outfielders was winning its fourth straight World Series, all Derry’s 40 home run season got him was a ticket to Class A.

It would take seven years and a World War to get Derry his shot at the Yankee outfield. By then he was 27-years-old. By 1944, DiMaggio, Keller, Henrich and Selkirk were all doing hitches in the military and Derry became the parent club’s fourth outfielder that season. He saw his most big league action the following season when he got into 78 games for New York and hit a career high 13 home runs. But he averaged just .225 that year against the second tier of pitching talent that took over the big league mounds during WWII. When the war ended and all the Yankees returned from military service the following year, Derry was sold to the A’s. He hit just .207 for Philadelphia and after one more brief shot with the Cardinals, finished out his playing career in the minors.

Derry shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this one too.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1944 NYY 38 135 114 14 29 3 0 4 14 1 20 19 .254 .366 .386 .752
1945 NYY 78 286 253 37 57 6 2 13 45 1 31 49 .225 .312 .419 .731
4 Yrs 187 637 553 68 124 17 7 17 73 2 78 124 .224 .322 .373 .695
NYY (2 yrs) 116 421 367 51 86 9 2 17 59 2 51 68 .234 .329 .409 .738
STL (1 yr) 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 .000 .000 .000 .000
PHA (1 yr) 69 214 184 17 38 8 5 0 14 0 27 54 .207 .311 .304 .616
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/7/2013.

October 6 – Happy Birthday John Knight

knightI learned a lot about today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant by reading this excellent article authored by Bill Nowlin for the the Society for American Baseball Research. It describes a young man who believed in the power of education and as a high school student in Philadelphia, was genuinely torn between going to college to pursue a career in medicine or playing professional baseball. In the end, the immediate opportunity to start in Connie Mack’s infield for his hometown Philadelphia A’s was just too compelling for John Knight to pass up.

He would become as much of a national sports sensation as one could back in 1905, before radio, television or the Internet were around, when he was the Opening Day nineteen-year-old starting shortstop for Philadelphia and was leading the league with a .400-plus batting average two weeks into the new season. He wasn’t able to maintain that torrid hitting pace and it would be his inability to hit big league pitching that landed him in the minor leagues, playing for the Baltimore Orioles, by 1908. That August, Knight’s contract was purchased by the New York Highlanders.

Knight realized his future in baseball would depend on his ability to become a better hitter and as he joined his new team, he was determined to do so. His efforts certainly bore some fruit. The Highlanders’ first year manager George Stallings made Knight his team’s starting shortstop in ’09 and he hit a career-high .236. In 1910, his offensive epiphany exploded into a .312 batting average and he followed that up by posting a career-high 62 RBIs in 1911. In just six years, he had transformed himself from an offensive liability into one of the game’s better hitting shortstops and Clark Griffith, the former New York manager who now skippered the Senators, noticed. He made it known that he was interested in acquiring Knight and kept poking the Highlander front office with trade offers for the infielder all during the 2011 season. New York finally bit during the 1912 spring training season when they accepted Washington catcher’s Gabby Street for Knight.

His short stay in our nation’s capitol was a disaster. Griffith started Knight at second base and it seemed as if he forgot how to hit and field, both at the same time. He averaged just .161 during the first half of that year and was then sold to a minor league club in New Jersey. He would end up getting a second chance with the Highlanders after he hit .270 for his Jersey City team during the first half of the 1913 season. He did OK with New York, starting at first base and averaging .236 for a very bad Highlander team but it wasn’t good enough to prevent him from getting sold back to the minors at the end of the year. He would remain a minor league player for the rest of his career, finally retiring for good in 1928, at the age of 42.

Knight’s early career start in the big leagues earned him the most appropriate nickname of  “Schoolboy.” At just over six feet two inches tall, Knight was the tallest shortstop in the big leagues.

Knight shares his birthday with this former Yankee outfielder, this former starting pitcher and this other former Yankee starting pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1909 NYY 116 416 360 46 85 8 5 0 40 15 37 68 .236 .311 .286 .597
1910 NYY 117 473 414 58 129 25 4 3 45 23 34 55 .312 .372 .413 .785
1911 NYY 132 542 470 69 126 16 7 3 62 18 42 63 .268 .342 .351 .693
1913 NYY 70 283 250 24 59 10 0 0 24 7 25 27 .236 .310 .276 .586
8 Yrs 767 2988 2664 301 636 96 24 14 270 86 211 448 .239 .300 .309 .609
NYY (4 yrs) 435 1714 1494 197 399 59 16 6 171 63 138 213 .267 .338 .340 .678
PHA (3 yrs) 202 776 717 63 144 26 4 6 61 11 38 157 .201 .244 .273 .517
WSH (1 yr) 32 116 93 10 15 2 1 0 9 4 16 25 .161 .284 .204 .489
BOS (1 yr) 98 382 360 31 78 9 3 2 29 8 19 53 .217 .256 .275 .531
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/6/2013.

October 5 – Happy Birthday Aaron Guiel

guielOK, this one is bugging me. How come I have absolutely no recollection of today’s  Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant playing for the Yankees, nothing, zero nada! Heck, if I can vividly remember the brief Yankee careers of  guys like Jack Reed, Marty Perez and Chris Widger, why do I draw such a blank on Aaron Guiel?

After all, it was just seven seasons ago, in 2006 that this short and stocky native Canadian played 33 games for my favorite team, split almost evenly as an outfielder and first baseman. The Yankees had picked him up off the waiver wire that July after his first and only other big league team, the Royals had put him there. That 2006 season was a particularly harsh one on Yankee outfielders. Gary Sheffield and Hideki Matsui both were shelved for most of the year with major injuries.

Guiel had spent his first four-and-a-half big league seasons as Kansas City’s fourth outfielder, averaging .246 during that span. He had decent power, as was evidenced by the career-high 15 homers he had hit for KC in 2003. At first, New York assigned him to their Triple A Columbus affiliate but when Johnny Damon strained a muscle in his back, the Yankees called Guiel (pronounced Guy-el) up.

He scored three runs in his pinstriped debut against Cleveland and in his first start at Yankee Stadium a week later, his first home run as a Bronx Bomber was the difference maker in a 6-5 win versus the White Sox. New York skipper, Joe Torre played him pretty regularly that first month, but when the Yanks completed their trade for Bobby Abreu from the Phillies at the end of July, Guiel was sent back to Columbus. He didn’t stay there long.

He was called back up two weeks later. Since the Yanks ran away with the AL East Division race that year, winning it by ten full games over second-place Toronto, Torre rested his regular outfielders as much as possible down the stretch and Guiel saw plenty of action as a result. That’s why it bothers me that I have no recollection of him playing for the Yankees. I guess because he did not make that year’s postseason roster and the Yanks ended up releasing him, the  44 games he played for New York just faded from my memory. Those ended up being the final 44 games of Guiel’s big league career.

In 2007, he signed to play for the Yakult Swallows, in Japan’s Central League and played there for the next five seasons. Guiel shares his birthday with this other former Yankee outfielder and this one-time Yankee utility infielder.

Year Age Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2006 33 NYY AL 44 92 82 16 21 3 0 4 11 2 7 20 .256 .337 .439 .776
5 Yrs 307 1099 970 151 239 58 0 35 128 8 83 218 .246 .322 .414 .736
KCR (5 yrs) 263 1007 888 135 218 55 0 31 117 6 76 198 .245 .320 .412 .733
NYY (1 yr) 44 92 82 16 21 3 0 4 11 2 7 20 .256 .337 .439 .776
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/5/2013.

October 4 – Happy Birthday Frank Crosetti

The Yankees had their own California Gold Rush in the 1920′s and ’30′s.  New York’s favorite mine for the precious metal was the Pacific Coast League, which back then was the equivalent of Major League Baseball for the western United States. The team’s prospecting began with San Francisco native Tony Lazzeri who the Yanks acquired from his Salt Lake City PCL team in August of 1925. Four years later, they struck gold again when they purchased the contract of pitcher Lefty Gomez from the San Francisco Seals. Their most famous western find of course was the great Joe DiMaggio, also born in the City by the Bay and also acquired from the Seals in 1934. In between the Gomez and DiMaggio additions came Frankie “The Crow” Crosetti, who was born on today’s date in 1910 in San Francisco. He spent more seasons in a Yankee uniform than any other human being. These included ten seasons as a starting shortstop, seven more as back-up shortstop and then a twenty-season tenure as New York’s third base coach. Not a force with the bat, Frankie was a good base-runner, an excellent fielder and one of the game’s all-time great sign stealers. He was also a skilled bunter and turned the act of getting hit by a pitch into an art form. He became one of Joe McCarthy’s favorite players.

The Yankees of the 1920s were a rowdy bunch, led by the greatest partier and biggest kid in big league history, Babe Ruth. The Yankees of the thirties eventually became the team of Lou Gehrig and McCarthy. They were all business on the field and much more quiet and reserved off of it. Crosetti joined the Yankees as the club was in the process of transitioning from being Ruth’s team to being Gehrig’s. Picking a side was an easy choice for the Crow.

Crosetti was a quiet guy off the field. In his New York Daily News obituary, the writer describes an evening after a Yankee game on the road, at the team’s hotel. Crosetti, Lazzeri and DiMaggio all came down to the lobby at the same time and sat next to each other for an hour and twenty minutes and not one of the three players said a word to each other.

He finished his playing career with a .245 lifetime average. His on base percentage during that time was almost 100 points higher. He collected 1,546 hits and scored 1,006 runs. He was not a great World Series performer although in the 1936 Fall Classic he drove in six runs in New York’s four-game sweep of the Cubs and also hit his one and only postseason home run off of the great but past-his-prime, Dizzy Dean.

He was also a no-nonsense Yankee coach. Crosetti often threw Yankee batting practices and he demanded that every player work on a specific hitting skill when it was their turn in the cage. If someone started swinging for the fences, Yogi Berra remembered Crosetti would actually just walk off the mound and refuse to throw the guy any more pitches. In his book “Ball Four,” Jim Bouton claimed that Crosetti was useless as a coach and hardly ever spoke to or attempted to instruct Yankee players. Ellie Howard later refuted that charge in his own book, claiming Bouton loved everybody on the team when he was pitching good and then hated and blamed everybody when his career went bad. Crosetti retired as a Yankee coach in 1968 but returned to the coaching box for a short time with both the Pilots and Twins.

He died in 2002, at the age of 91. He owned 17 World Series rings. Actually, Crosetti had accumulated so many rings, the Yankees finally started giving him engraved shotguns instead. In all, Crosetti received 23 World Series paychecks as a Yankee player (9) and coach (14). They totaled $142,989.30.

The Crow shares his October 4th birthday with this long ago Yankee spitballer.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1932 NYY 116 461 398 47 96 20 9 5 57 3 51 51 .241 .335 .374 .709
1933 NYY 136 513 451 71 114 20 5 9 60 4 55 40 .253 .337 .379 .716
1934 NYY 138 632 554 85 147 22 10 11 67 5 61 58 .265 .344 .401 .744
1935 NYY 87 351 305 49 78 17 6 8 50 3 41 27 .256 .351 .430 .781
1936 NYY 151 738 632 137 182 35 7 15 78 18 90 83 .288 .387 .437 .824
1937 NYY 149 718 611 127 143 29 5 11 49 13 86 105 .234 .340 .352 .692
1938 NYY 157 757 631 113 166 35 3 9 55 27 106 97 .263 .382 .371 .752
1939 NYY 152 743 656 109 153 25 5 10 56 11 65 81 .233 .315 .332 .647
1940 NYY 145 632 546 84 106 23 4 4 31 14 72 77 .194 .299 .273 .572
1941 NYY 50 170 148 13 33 2 2 1 22 0 18 14 .223 .320 .284 .603
1942 NYY 74 328 285 50 69 5 5 4 23 1 31 31 .242 .335 .337 .672
1943 NYY 95 395 348 36 81 8 1 2 20 4 36 47 .233 .317 .279 .596
1944 NYY 55 220 197 20 47 4 2 5 30 3 11 21 .239 .299 .355 .654
1945 NYY 130 524 441 57 105 12 0 4 48 7 59 65 .238 .341 .293 .634
1946 NYY 28 69 59 4 17 3 0 0 3 0 8 2 .288 .382 .339 .721
1947 NYY 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
1948 NYY 17 16 14 4 4 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 .286 .375 .429 .804
17 Yrs 1683 7268 6277 1006 1541 260 65 98 649 113 792 799 .245 .341 .354 .695
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/4/2013.

October 3 – Happy Birthday Armando Marsans

marsansArmando Marsans’ father was a wealthy Cuban merchant who took his family to New York City to live at the turn of the 20th century to shield them from the violence of the Spanish American War. By the time the 13-year-old boy returned to his homeland after the conflict ended, he had learned how to play America’s favorite pastime well enough to eventually become a star outfielder in the Cuban Winter League.

With Major League teams visiting the island country every winter to participate in exhibition games against Cuban native all-stars, it did not take long for Marsans to get signed by a big league organization, the Cincinnati Reds. In 1911, he and his long-time friend and teammate, pitcher Rafael Almeida became the first native Cubans to play in the Majors when they made their debut with the Reds. Marsans was ready for the challenge. He averaged .317 in 1912, his first full big league season and stole 35 bases. It wasn’t long before he was being touted as one of the best young outfielders in baseball.

That’s when Marsans got into a huge and prolonged argument with his Reds’ manager Buck Herzog that culminated in the outfielder’s suspension. An angry and offended Marsans responded by jumping to the newly formed Federal League, signing a sizable three-year contract to play for the St. Louis Terriers. The owner of the Cincinnati team responded by going to court and obtaining an injunction that prevented the Cuban from playing for the Terriers while a judge decided if he had violated the terms of his Reds’ contract. After playing just nine games for his new team and league, Marsans was forced off the field and returned to Cuba to await the judge’s decision. It wasn’t until the end of the 1915 regular season that the court permitted Marsans to resume playing with his new Federal League team while his case was being considered.

By then, the Federal League was staggering under financial difficulties that would force it to disband a few weeks later. Marsans ended up in the American League, playing for the St Louis Browns. He had a decent season for the Brownies in 1916, starting in their outfield, driving in 60 runs and finishing second in the AL with 46 stolen bases. But the almost two-year-layoff forced upon him by the Reds had a negative impact on Marsans overall game and he was never again the same player he had been before he jumped to the Federal League.

After he got off to a slow start with the Browns in 1917, he was traded to the Yankees in July of that season, for outfielder, Lee Magee. In New York, he joined fellow Cuban outfielder Angel Aragon. Unfortunately for Marsans, he broke his leg during just his 25th game in pinstripes. He went back to Cuba to heal and when he failed to report to the Yankees 1918 spring training camp, it looked like he was retiring. Two months later, he changed his mind and rejoined the team. After his first three starts during his second season in New York, Marsans had seven hits in his first 13 at bats and was averaging .538. But it was pretty much all downhill after that and when he left the team that July, the temperamental 30-year-old was averaging just .236.

He would unsuccessfully try to revive his baseball career in America a few years later but remained a force in Cuban baseball as both a player and a manager for years to come.

Marsans, who was a charter member of Cuba’s Baseball Hall of Fame, joins this US Baseball Hall-of-Fame member and this former Yankee pitcher as October 3rd Pinstripe Birthday Celebrants.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1917 NYY 25 100 88 10 20 4 0 0 15 6 8 3 .227 .292 .273 .564
1918 NYY 37 132 123 13 29 5 1 0 9 3 5 3 .236 .266 .293 .558
8 Yrs 655 2547 2273 267 612 67 19 2 221 171 173 117 .269 .325 .318 .643
CIN (4 yrs) 322 1224 1113 141 334 31 15 1 109 96 66 59 .300 .345 .358 .702
SLM (2 yrs) 45 188 164 21 36 3 2 0 8 9 17 5 .220 .293 .262 .555
NYY (2 yrs) 62 232 211 23 49 9 1 0 24 9 13 6 .232 .277 .284 .561
SLB (2 yrs) 226 903 785 82 193 24 1 1 80 57 77 47 .246 .318 .283 .601
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/2/2013.