August 2013

August 31 – Happy Birthday Claudell Washington

I remember the 1974 baseball season very well because it brought forth a personal and slightly painful milestone. Today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant made his big league debut as a much-heralded 19-year-old outfielder with the 1974 Oakland A’s. He and the Milwaukee Brewer’s Robin Yount were the first players to start regularly for a Major League team, who were younger than me. There of course have been many more since.

That Oakland team was about to capture its third straight World Championship and there were baseball pundits back then predicting that the multi-talented Washington would lead the team to many more.  It looked like those experts might be right when in his sophomore season, Washington led the A’s with 182 hits and a .308 batting average as Oakland captured its fifth straight AL West Division title. But that was the same season the A’s lost the rights to Catfish Hunter due to their failure to honor an insurance clause in the pitcher’s contract  and within a year, free agency would begin decimating Oakland’s All Star roster.  Surprisingly, it would take Claudell thirteen years to top the .300 batting average barrier again and when it happened, he was wearing Yankee pinstripes.

Claudell played with seven different teams during his seventeen-season big league career including two stops in the Bronx. He first became a Yankee in 1988 when New York traded Ken Griffey Sr and Andre Robertson to the Braves for Washington and Paul Zuvella. After signing with the Angels as a free agent in 1989, the Yankees reacquired Claudell in exchange for outfielder Louis Polonia. His best season in pinstripes was his first, in 1988 when he hit .308. In April of that year, Washington hit the 10,000th home run in Yankee franchise history. Claudell was born on August 31, 1954, in Los Angeles. He shares his birthday with this Hall-of-Fame pitcher, who was traded to the Yankees but never pitched for them.

Here’s my version of the Yankee’s All-Presidential Team followed by Claudell’s Yankee and career stats.

1B – Nick Johnson
2B – Homer Bush
3B – Charley Hayes
SS – John Kennedy
C – Cliff Johnson
OF – Reggie Jackson
OF – Claudell Washington
OF – Otis Nixon or Lou Clinton
SP – Whitey Ford
RP – Grant Jackson

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1986 NYY 54 144 135 19 32 5 0 6 16 6 7 33 .237 .285 .407 .692
1987 NYY 102 339 312 42 87 17 0 9 44 10 27 54 .279 .336 .420 .756
1988 NYY 126 485 455 62 140 22 3 11 64 15 24 74 .308 .342 .442 .784
1990 NYY 33 83 80 4 13 1 1 0 6 3 2 17 .163 .181 .200 .381
17 Yrs 1912 7367 6787 926 1884 334 69 164 824 312 468 1266 .278 .325 .420 .745
ATL (6 yrs) 651 2586 2330 347 647 116 25 67 279 115 213 426 .278 .339 .435 .774
NYY (4 yrs) 315 1051 982 127 272 45 4 26 130 34 60 178 .277 .320 .410 .730
CHW (3 yrs) 249 938 875 127 241 53 12 20 109 28 45 169 .275 .312 .432 .744
OAK (3 yrs) 355 1402 1301 167 371 54 18 15 149 83 75 214 .285 .326 .389 .715
TEX (2 yrs) 141 597 563 64 155 31 2 12 70 21 26 124 .275 .309 .401 .710
CAL (2 yrs) 122 487 452 56 120 19 4 14 45 14 29 92 .265 .312 .418 .730
NYM (1 yr) 79 306 284 38 78 16 4 10 42 17 20 63 .275 .324 .465 .788
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/31/2013.

August 30 – Happy Birthday Roger Erickson

ericksonOpening Day of the 1982 season marked the official beginning of the second fall of the Yankee Dynasty. At that point, George Steinbrenner’s team had played in five of the previous six postseasons and split their four World Series appearances. But fall ball would become a memory for the franchise as the ’82 regular season commenced. It would be fourteen seasons before the Yanks made it back to the playoffs and fifteen years before they once again were participants (and victors) in a Fall Classic.

The 1981 strike and the Yankees’ loss to the Dodgers in that year’s Series seemed to push the Boss a bit over the edge. He became even more directly involved in the team’s personnel decisions. Convinced that his Bronx Bombers needed to convert to a small ball offense, he began drafting and trading for pieces that he thought fit that scheme. He also seemed intent on seeking revenge on Yankee players who had disappointed him. In the process, he created a hodge-podge roster that floundered in the AL East.

One of the players he was pissed at was Yankee starting catcher Rick Cerone. The Boss and the receiver had gotten into a highly publicized locker-room argument after Cerone’s base-running blunder cost the Yankees a game during the 1981 ALDS. Enflaming that situation was Steinbrenner’s anger over the fact that Cerone had taken him to salary arbitration before that ’81 season and won. So when the catcher had a horrible ALCS and World Series, the Yankee owner had the excuse he needed to go out and get another starting catcher. That turned out to be Butch Wynegar, who after a strong first couple of years behind the plate in Minnesota, had evolved into a very ordinary big league receiver.

In late May of the 1982 season, the Yankees made the deal to bring the Twins’ catcher and today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant to New York. Like Wynegar, Roger Erickson had gotten his big league career off to an excellent start in Minnesota with a 14-win rookie season in 1978 and like his battery mate, it had been pretty much downhill for him ever since. A tall slender right hander and a native of Springfield, Illinois, Erickson’s father Don had pitched one game for the Phillies and his Uncle and two cousins had all pitched for a time in the minors.

He got off to a horrible start as a Yankee losing his first four decisions, but then rebounded during the month of July to win four consecutive starts. That’s when he hurt his right shoulder and was pretty much shelved for the rest of the season. In the mean time, that 1982 Yankee team went through three managers and finished in fifth place in the AL East.

The following spring, a healthy Erickson was looking forward to getting back into New York’s starting rotation but instead was told he’d start the 1983 season pitching for Columbus. The bitterly disappointed pitcher told the team he would retire if he was sent back to the minors. The Yankees tried to assure him he was part of their future and in a classic retort, the pitcher told them he didn’t want to be part of their future because “Its frustrating enough being part of your present.” That just about sums up what it must have felt like for plenty of the players who came and went from the Bronx during that fourteen year period of post-seasonless play. A team owned by a ship-builder that ironically seemed to be operating without a rudder.

Eventually, Erickson did accept the demotion and then got called back up that September. Three months later, he was traded to the Royals with Steve Balboni for two guys you probably never heard of. Erickson never threw another pitch in the big leagues.

He shares his birthday with this former Yankee third baseman and this former Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1982 NYY 4 5 .444 4.46 16 11 1 0 0 1 70.2 86 36 35 5 17 37 1.458
1983 NYY 0 1 .000 4.32 5 0 2 0 0 0 16.2 13 8 8 1 8 7 1.260
6 Yrs 35 53 .398 4.13 135 117 5 24 0 1 799.1 868 419 367 68 251 365 1.400
MIN (5 yrs) 31 47 .397 4.10 114 106 2 24 0 0 712.0 769 375 324 62 226 321 1.397
NYY (2 yrs) 4 6 .400 4.43 21 11 3 0 0 1 87.1 99 44 43 6 25 44 1.420
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/31/2013.

August 29 – Happy Birthday George Zeber

You have to be a very good and long-time Yankee fan to remember when George Zeber played for the Yankees. It was back in 1977, and Zeber surprised everyone by making the team in spring training. That year’s Yankee squad were the defending AL Champions. Manager Billy Martin liked the fact that Zeber could play second, short and third so he brought the native of Elwood City, PA north that April and made him one of his primary utility infielders.

At the time, Zeber was already 27 years old and his path to the Majors had been anything but a cakewalk. His Dad had died when he was just five years old. Fortunately, the man his Mom then married was a great guy and baseball fan who got his new stepson involved in the game. He was a fifth round draft choice of the Yankees in 1968 but after just one year in the minors he was drafted and actually spent a year in front line combat duty in the jungles of Vietnam. He survived the war but when he returned to the minors he suffered a severe knee injury that pretty much stalled his development for two years. All that adversity would serve him well when he became part of Manager Martin’s Bronx Zoo Clubhouse.

He got his first big league at bat that May and remained on the roster the entire season, appearing in 25 games, getting 75 plate appearances and hitting a healthy .325. He even made that year’s World Series roster getting two at bats against the Dodgers but striking out both times. In 1978 he lost his roster spot to Brian Doyle and was sent back down to Syracuse, never again appearing in a big league game. He played the 1978 season with the Yankee’s Tacoma affiliate and then hung up his spikes for good. He then got into real estate and built a successful career for himself. It probably didn’t hurt that he was wearing a New York Yankee World Championship ring when he introduced himself to new realty clients.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1977 NYY 25 75 65 8 21 3 0 3 10 0 9 11 .323 .405 .508 .913
1978 NYY 3 6 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
2 Yrs 28 81 71 8 21 3 0 3 10 0 9 11 .296 .375 .465 .840
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/29/2013.

August 28 – Happy Birthday Jay Witasick

WitasickThe great Yankee bullpen of the late 1990′s had been disrupted by the departure of right-hander Jeff Nelson after the 2000 season. Brian Cashman had spent the first three weeks of June in 2001 trying to put the finishing touches on a trade with the Expos for Ugueth Urbina but the deal fell apart at the last second.

I remember salivating over the possible addition of Ugie when rumors of the proposed deal became public. Naturally, I was disappointed when  my favorite team ended up with Jay Witasick in their bullpen instead.

At the time of his acquisition, Witasick had already been pitching in the big leagues for five seasons with three different teams. He also had never posted an ERA below 5.64 in any of them. But then suddenly, during the first half of the 2001 season, he was getting everybody out for the San Diego Padres. His fastball was suddenly faster, his control sharper and his ERA was a microscopic 1.86. Cashman was willing to ignore Witasick’s half decade of big league history and sent Yankee infield prospect D’Angelo Jimenez to San Diego in exchange for the six-foot-four-inch, right-handed native of Baltimore.

The newest Yankee then got shelled in his first appearance against Baltimore but settled down and pitched decent ball for New York through August. Then he got hot during the final month of the 2001 season, turning in ten consecutive appearances without surrendering an earned run, earning him a spot on Joe Torre’s postseason roster. That proved to be a bad decision.

He did not pitch well in his only ALDS appearance against Seattle. He pitched even worse in his only ALCS appearance against the Angels and then turned in one of the worst World Series pitching performances in the history of the Yankee franchise.

After Andy Pettitte gave up four runs during the first two innings of Game Six against Arizona, Torre replaced him with Witasick in the top of the third with two Diamondbacks on base. Witasick permitted those two runners to score and then proceeded to give up nine more runs of his own, making his World Series ERA 54.00. You know what’s even more remarkable? Naturally, George Steinbrenner had this guy jettisoned from New York after that Series and he ended up back in the World Series the very next season with San Francisco. How did he do? In two appearances for the Giants in that Fall Classic, he retired just one batter and posted a second consecutive World Series ERA of 54.00.

Witasick shares his birthday with this Yankee second baseman from the 1920′sthis former Cy Young Award winner, this outfielder known for his sweet swing and this one-time Yankee pitcher who also gave up Bucky Dent’s home run.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2001 NYY 3 0 1.000 4.69 32 0 8 0 0 0 40.1 47 27 21 5 18 53 1.612
12 Yrs 32 41 .438 4.64 405 56 101 3 1 5 731.1 775 429 377 97 364 645 1.557
OAK (6 yrs) 5 5 .500 5.26 91 3 25 0 0 1 116.1 127 78 68 22 73 115 1.719
SDP (4 yrs) 11 12 .478 3.96 132 11 43 0 0 4 206.2 199 108 91 26 101 206 1.452
KCR (2 yrs) 12 20 .375 5.71 54 42 4 3 1 0 247.2 300 173 157 38 121 169 1.700
TBD (1 yr) 0 0 6.61 20 0 5 0 0 0 16.1 17 13 12 1 18 8 2.143
COL (1 yr) 0 4 .000 2.52 32 0 7 0 0 0 35.2 27 11 10 2 12 40 1.093
SFG (1 yr) 1 0 1.000 2.37 44 0 9 0 0 0 68.1 58 19 18 3 21 54 1.156
NYY (1 yr) 3 0 1.000 4.69 32 0 8 0 0 0 40.1 47 27 21 5 18 53 1.612
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/28/2013.

August 27 – Happy Birthday Jim York

Jim York2Jim York had been a pretty decent reliever for both the Royals and Astros, by the time the Yankees purchased the six foot three inch right-hander from Houston in January of 1976. Although he already had five-plus big league seasons under his belt at the time, New York assigned their “new York” to their triple A team in Syracuse where he started the season with a 6-1 record pitching out of the Chiefs’ bullpen. Even though his triple A ERA was a sky high 5.34, the Yankees called him up that July to serve as a middle reliever.

On July 20 1976, Billy Martin started Ken Holtzman in an afternoon game at Comiskey Park. The Yanks had acquired the veteran right-hander a month earlier in a blockbuster 10-player deal they did with the Orioles. Holtzman had struggled in his first few starts in pinstripes and that didn’t please Martin or Yankee owner George Steinbrenner. Based on what I’ve read about their relationships, if I saw these three guys getting on the same elevator, I’d wait for the next one. They hated each other.

So when Holtzman gave up seven runs in the first inning of that start against Chicago, you know both Martin and the Boss had to be fuming as Jim York was called in to pitch for his very first time in pinstripes. The native of Maywood, California was up to the task. He held the White Sox to just two runs over the next seven innings while the Yankee offense went on a roll. When the game was called on count of rain, with one out in the home half of the eighth inning, the Yankees were ahead 14-7 and York had earned his first and only Yankee victory.

He would make two more relief appearances for Martin that year, getting hit pretty hard in both. After that third appearance, the Yankees released him and he would never again pitch in a big league game. He shares his birthday with a former Yankee backup catcher, who also spent some time playing for Houston. Here’s my all-time lineup of Yankees who also played for the Astros:

1b Bob Watson
2b Andy Stankiewicz
3b Morgan Ensberg
ss Jose Vizcaino
c Cliff Johnson
of Jimmy Wynn
of Joe Pepitone
of Lance Berkman
sp Andy Pettitte
sp Roger Clemens
cl Mark Melancon
mgr Bill Virdon

Here ares Jim York’s Yankee and career stats:

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1976 NYY 1 0 1.000 5.59 3 0 1 0 0 0 9.2 14 7 6 1 4 6 1.862
7 Yrs 16 17 .485 3.79 174 4 80 0 0 10 285.0 290 131 120 19 132 194 1.481
HOU (4 yrs) 9 11 .450 4.19 114 4 55 0 0 7 174.0 201 89 81 9 82 79 1.626
KCR (2 yrs) 6 6 .500 2.93 57 0 24 0 0 3 101.1 75 35 33 9 46 109 1.194
NYY (1 yr) 1 0 1.000 5.59 3 0 1 0 0 0 9.2 14 7 6 1 4 6 1.862
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/27/2013.

August 26 – Happy Birthday Jayson Nix


nixMr. and Mrs. Nix must have wanted their boys to remember to always be curious. They added unnecessary “Y’s” to both their first names. The older of the two boys is named Laynce, who’s been a big league outfielder since 2003 and currently plays for the Phillies. His younger brother, Jayson was a 2001 first round draft pick of the Colorado Rockies, and has served as the Yankees’ jack-of-all-trades utility infielder for the past two seasons.

When the Yankees brought up the younger Nix in May of 2012 to take the place of Eduardo Nunez as the team’s primary utility infielder, I thought someone in the front office had made a big mistake. I agreed that Nunez’s defensive shortcomings warranted the demotion, but Nix had batted just .169 for the Blue Jays in 2011, making me think he’d be too big of an offensive liability to play very much. I underestimated him.

I’ve now nicknamed Nix “the Caulk Gun” because he’s done such a credible job filling in the huge cracks in both the Yankee’s offense and defense that have been caused by the un-Godly large number of injuries the team has suffered during the past two seasons. In 2012 he appeared in 74 games for New York, making 54 starts. He played all or parts of 29 games at third, 18 at short, 13 at second and 11 in left field, plus he DH’d in a couple more. Thus far in 2013, Nix had started 41 games at third base for New York and 33 more at short, while the Yankees waited for A-Rod and Derek Jeter to recover from offseason surgeries. Ironically, now that both of those superstars are finally ready to play in the same infield for the first time since those surgeries were performed, it is Nix who is on the DL with a broken hand. Since coming to the Bronx, he’s been more than adequate defensively in every position he’s played and he’s also hit right around .240 in pinstripes, which is 22 points above his career average. He’s also contributed some mighty timely hits along the way. About the only negative thing Nix has done since joining the team is hit the ball in batting practice last May that Mariano Rivera was attempting to catch when the fabled closer blew out his ACL.

The Caulk Gun was born on this date in Dallas in 1982. He made his big league debut with the Rockies in 2008 and in addition to the Blue Jays, he’s also played for the White Sox and Indians. Nix shares his birthday with this one-time Yankee third baseman.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2012 NYY 74 202 177 24 43 13 0 4 18 6 14 53 .243 .306 .384 .690
2013 NYY 87 303 267 32 63 9 1 3 24 13 24 80 .236 .308 .311 .619
6 Yrs 425 1374 1222 141 267 55 2 37 126 35 105 343 .218 .290 .358 .647
NYY (2 yrs) 161 505 444 56 106 22 1 7 42 19 38 133 .239 .307 .340 .647
CHW (2 yrs) 118 347 304 39 65 12 0 13 37 10 35 76 .214 .301 .382 .683
COL (1 yr) 22 65 56 2 7 2 0 0 2 1 7 17 .125 .234 .161 .395
CLE (1 yr) 78 306 282 29 66 14 0 13 29 1 13 75 .234 .283 .422 .705
TOR (1 yr) 46 151 136 15 23 5 1 4 16 4 12 42 .169 .245 .309 .554
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/26/2013.

August 25 – Happy Birthday Adam Warren

warrenEvery professional baseball player has the same exact basic goals. The first is to make it to the big leagues. Adam Warren checked that one off his bucket list in late June of the 2012 season, when the Yanks called him up from Scranton-Wilkes Barre to make an emergency start after both CC Sabathia and Andy Pettitte went down with injuries.

The second goal is to make a great first impression in your Major League debut. Warren screwed that one up. He got shelled by the White Sox in his first appearance, giving up eight hits, including two bombs and surrendering six earned runs, lasting just two and a third innings in the 14-7 Yankee loss. That disastrous first effort put a real quick kabosh on the third goal every professional baseball player shares, which is once called up, to stay in the Majors. The Yankees sent Warren down the next day.

It took Warren right up to the last day of the Yankees 2013 spring training season to convince Joe Girardi and Larry Rothschild that he deserved a second chance. He’s been New York’s long relief guy out of the bullpen since. With a few exceptions, this right-handed native of Birmingham, Alabama has pitched well in that role and since Hiroki Kuroda, Andy Pettitte and Phil Hughes are in the last year of contracts, Warren’s next goal is to pitch well enough to earn a spot in next season’s version of the Yankee starting rotation.

Does he have a chance? Sure. He’s only 25-years-old, he’s now got some innings under his belt and he’s already on the team. A fourth round Yankee draft pick in 2009, Warren has a decent but not overpowering fastball so he must be able to hit his spots to win at the big league level. His control has been just so-so thus far during the 2013 season (22 unintentional walks in 62 innings.) From my perspective, Warren has to notch his game up to a higher gear before I think he’s ready to join a Yankee rotation.

He shares his birthday with this former Yankee shortstop, this former Yankee reliever and this other former Yankee reliever.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2012 NYY 0 0 23.14 1 1 0 0 0 0 2.1 8 6 6 2 2 1 4.286
2013 NYY 1 2 .333 3.69 25 1 14 0 0 1 61.0 65 25 25 10 24 50 1.459
2 Yrs 1 2 .333 4.41 26 2 14 0 0 1 63.1 73 31 31 12 26 51 1.563
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/25/2013.

August 24 – Happy Birthday Brett Gardner

brettgardnerI’m a fan of Brett Gardner. It took me a quite a while to figure that out and I’m still not one hundred percent convinced of it, but as of right now this instant, I’m a fan. He plays the game hard all the time and I absolutely love that. He’s an excellent outfielder who covers massive amounts of ground and that’s huge, especially during this up and down 2013 Yankee season when the Yankee starting rotation has been giving up one hard hit fly ball after another. I also love Gardner’s enthusiasm. He’s New York’s biggest cheerleader and his teammates’ biggest defender. You can tell he loves to play the game and cherishes the privilege.

Now permit me to explain why it has taken me so long to become a full fledged member of the Brett Gardner fan club. Sometimes, not as often as he used to but still sometimes, this guy drives me absolutely crazy. Like when he’s on first base with second base open and he doesn’t attempt to steal early in the count. For a while there, he was striking out way too much for a small-ball specialist. I’ve seen him swing at some horrible full count pitches and he doesn’t seem as willing to accept base-on-balls as he used to be. But he has proven to be a much better hitter than I thought he was and Gardner’s great speed can change the dynamic of a game at any point and forces Yankee opponents to throw lots of hit-able fast balls when he is on the base paths. He has also proven to be a good leadoff hitter though when he used to hit ninth, I thought he was one of the best bottom of the lineup guys in all of baseball.

Hard to believe he turns 30-years-old today and even harder to believe he’s playing in his sixth Yankee season already. He’s eligible for arbitration at the end of this year and free agency the next. There was a time when I thought the Yankees might trade Gardner and try to replace him with a power-hitting corner outfielder. I don’t think that any more. The current Yankee management team has a real tough time thinking big these days so I believe Gardner eventually signs at least a three-year deal to remain in pinstripes. And that’s not a bad thing, or is it?

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2008 NYY 42 141 127 18 29 5 2 0 16 13 1 8 30 .228 .283 .299 .582
2009 NYY 108 284 248 48 67 6 6 3 23 26 5 26 40 .270 .345 .379 .724
2010 NYY 150 569 477 97 132 20 7 5 47 47 9 79 101 .277 .383 .379 .762
2011 NYY 159 588 510 87 132 19 8 7 36 49 13 60 93 .259 .345 .369 .713
2012 NYY 16 37 31 7 10 2 0 0 3 2 2 5 7 .323 .417 .387 .804
2013 NYY 125 530 473 65 126 25 7 8 43 21 7 43 107 .266 .332 .400 .732
6 Yrs 600 2149 1866 322 496 77 30 23 168 158 37 221 378 .266 .349 .376 .725
162 Game Avg. 162 580 504 87 134 21 8 6 45 43 10 60 102 .266 .349 .376 .725
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/24/2013.

August 23 – Happy Birthday Cedric Durst

durstIt was the greatest trade in Yankee history. Today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant was a utility outfielder on the great Murderers Row Yankee teams that won the 1927 and ’28 World Series. With a starting outfield of Babe Ruth, Earle Combs and Bob Meusel, Cedric Durst usually only saw action when the Babe was tired, sick or hung over. He was one of Yankee skipper, Miller Huggins’ spare parts, who had broken into the big leagues with the St. Louis Browns in 1922 and been traded to New York for pitcher, Sad Sam Jones five seasons later.

As each Yankee season passed, Durst saw his playing time increase. Its only natural that other teams in need of outfielders would be interested in looking at the one who backed up the greatest all-around player in the game. Unlike previous Red Sox-Yankee trades, no other teams cried “foul” when New York sent Durst to Boston for a 25-year-old pitcher named Red Ruffing, early in the second month of the 1930 regular season. Heck, I bet hardly anybody even noticed the deal.

At the time, Ruffing was just beginning his sixth season as a member of the Red Sox starting rotation and his lifetime record was an abysmal 39-96. That converts to a woeful .289 winning percentage and when you throw in the right hander’s career 4.61 ERA at the time of the trade, you can understand why when the Durst/Ruffing deal went down it got just a two-paragraph mention on the sports pages of the New York Times.

So all Ruffing does after switching his red hosiery for a pinstriped jersey is go 15-5 during the rest of that 1930 season and put together a 231-124 Hall of Fame career for the Bronx Bombers. When he retired, he was the winningest pitcher in Yankee franchise history. How did Durst do in Boston? Well, he did become a starter for the first time in his career, getting into 102 games for the Red Sox during the rest of that 1930 season. But he averaged just .245 and his on base percentage was only .290. Heck, during Ruffing’s last season in Beantown, the great hitting pitcher had averaged .364 and driven in six more runs than Durst did for the Red Sox in half as many games. Boston would have actually been better off keeping Ruffing and switching him to the outfield full time. Instead, they found themselves again on the losing end of one of the most lop-sided trades in history.

That 1930 season would be Durst’s only one as a Red Sox and the final season of his big league career. He went back to the minors in 1931 and continued playing baseball until  1943, when he was 46-years-old. He shares his birthday with baseball’s first-ever DH and this former Yankee catching prospect who became a big league All Star.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1927 NYY 65 142 129 18 32 4 3 0 25 0 6 7 .248 .281 .326 .607
1928 NYY 74 146 135 18 34 2 1 2 10 1 7 9 .252 .289 .326 .615
1929 NYY 92 223 202 32 52 3 3 4 31 3 15 25 .257 .309 .361 .670
1930 NYY 8 19 19 0 3 1 0 0 5 0 0 1 .158 .158 .211 .368
7 Yrs 481 1220 1103 145 269 39 17 15 124 7 75 100 .244 .294 .351 .645
NYY (4 yrs) 239 530 485 68 121 10 7 6 71 4 28 42 .249 .290 .336 .627
SLB (3 yrs) 140 360 316 48 74 10 5 8 29 0 30 34 .234 .303 .373 .676
BOS (1 yr) 102 330 302 29 74 19 5 1 24 3 17 24 .245 .290 .351 .641
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/23/2013.

August 22 – Happy Birthday David Huff

huffWhat a birthday present today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant gave himself, his teammates and Yankee fans last evening at the Stadium. David Huff turns 29-years-old today and last night Joe Girardi called on him to relieve spot starter Adam Warren in the fourth inning of New York’s game against Toronto. All he did was huff and puff and close the Blue Jays offense down for five innings allowing the Yankee offense to rally and win the game. I got to admit, I wondered why New York put this left-handed reliever on their roster earlier this month and even wondered why Girardi went to him in that game last night, but I’m not wondering any more.

Originally a first round draft pick of the Cleveland Indians in 2006, Huff went 11-9 during his 2009 rookie season with the Tribe but his ERA that year was too high at 5.61. It got even higher in his sophomore year, climbing to 6.21 and this time he paid for it with an abysmal 2-11 record. Cleveland kept him around in their organization for three more years, before giving up on the native of San Diego and placing him on waivers earlier this season.

The Yankees grabbed him and sent him to their triple A team in Scranton/Wilkes Barre. He didn’t pitch very well there, going 1-6 with an ERA just under four so no one was probably more surprised than Huff himself when he was told he was headed to the Bronx.. In fact, that conversation never would have taken place if Dellin Betances, one of the original Killer B’s, who was called just before Huff had not been abused in his only appearance against the Angels. When the Yanks sent Betances back down they replaced him with Huff,

Truth is that its way too early to tell if Huff can stick in the Yankee bullpen for the rest of this season, but if he can put together a few more outings like the one he had last night against the Jays, he won’t be going anywhere for at least a while. Huff shares his birthday with this former Yankee catcher and this former starting pitcher.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
2013 NYY 0 0 6.75 2 0 2 0 0 0 1.1 1 1 1 0 2 1 2.250
5 Yrs 18 26 .409 5.41 60 52 4 1 0 0 289.2 353 198 174 41 100 163 1.564
CLE (5 yrs) 18 26 .409 5.40 58 52 2 1 0 0 288.1 352 197 173 41 98 162 1.561
NYY (1 yr) 0 0 6.75 2 0 2 0 0 0 1.1 1 1 1 0 2 1 2.250
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/22/2013.