July 5 – Happy Birthday Dave Eiland

eilandOne of the things that always confused me is how guys who could not hit well at the big league level somehow become highly respected hitting coaches for Major League teams. Remember Charley Lau? Here’s a former player who couldn’t crack a starting lineup during the eleven years he played in the bigs because he averaged in the two-fifties, yet if you ask George Brett who it was that made him one of baseball’s great hitters, he credits Lau. The same mystery applies to bad pitchers who become great pitching coaches. Leo  Mazzone was considered one of the game’s great ones during his tenure in that role with Bobby Cox’s Braves yet he wasn’t good enough to pitch even to a single batter at the Major League level.

Today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant was considered a top Yankee pitching prospect in the late 1980’s, when the team was in desperate need of starting pitchers. Drafted by New York out of the University of South Florida in the seventh round of the 1987 draft, Dave Eiland was being pegged as the next great Yankee right-hander after he was named the International League’s Pitcher of the Year in 1990. But he was a bust for the Yanks and the two other teams he pitched for at the big league level between 1988 and 2000, finishing his playing career with a 12-27 record and a career ERA of 5.74.

That’s when he turned to coaching. The Yankees hired him as a minor league pitching coach and he immediately impressed the organization with his ability to effectively work with young pitchers. He quickly worked his way up the New York farm chain, establishing an excellent rapport with prospects like Phil Hughes, Ian Kennedy and Joba Chamberlain along the way. That’s why it seemed to make sense when the Yankees announced Eiland would replace Ron Guidry as the Yankee pitching coach in 2008. Brian Cashman was betting the team’s postseason chances on the young arms of Hughes, Kennedy and Chamberlain that year and he felt Eiland was the guy who could successfully transition them from minor to major league pitchers. That did not happen.

Eiland however, escaped front office wrath for the failed experiment and when the Yanks won the World Series in 2009, the young pitching coach was credited for helping AJ Burnett overcome the inconsistencies in his delivery to finish wit a 13-9 record and a huge win in Game 2 of that year’s Fall Classic.

It all unraveled for Eiland in June of the 2010 season when Eiland took a mysterious leave of absence from his Yankee coaching responsibilities for most of the month of June, citing personal family issues as the reason. During his leave, AJ Burnett literally fell apart, going 0-5 and never again reaching the comfort or performance level in Pinstripes he had enjoyed during his first season in the Bronx. Though it wasn’t officially given as the reason, most Yankee fans and pundits suspect it was Eiland’s leave that caused the team to dismiss him after the 2010 season and bring in current pitching coach, Larry Rothschilds. Eiland has since landed on his feet, getting the pitching coach position for the Kansas City Royals in 2012.

He shares his July 5th birthday with this Hall of Fame closer, this former Yankee pitcher and this one-time New York outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1988 NYY 0 0 6.39 3 3 0 0 0 0 12.2 15 9 9 6 4 7 1.500
1989 NYY 1 3 .250 5.77 6 6 0 0 0 0 34.1 44 25 22 5 13 11 1.660
1990 NYY 2 1 .667 3.56 5 5 0 0 0 0 30.1 31 14 12 2 5 16 1.187
1991 NYY 2 5 .286 5.33 18 13 4 0 0 0 72.2 87 51 43 10 23 18 1.514
1995 NYY 1 1 .500 6.30 4 1 1 0 0 0 10.0 16 10 7 1 3 6 1.900
10 Yrs 12 27 .308 5.74 92 70 6 0 0 0 373.0 465 274 238 46 118 153 1.563
NYY (5 yrs) 6 10 .375 5.23 36 28 5 0 0 0 160.0 193 109 93 24 48 58 1.506
TBD (3 yrs) 6 12 .333 6.54 39 26 1 0 0 0 137.2 181 111 100 16 48 71 1.663
SDP (2 yrs) 0 5 .000 5.38 17 16 0 0 0 0 75.1 91 54 45 6 22 24 1.500
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/5/2013.

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