March 26 – Happy Birthday Bill Zuber

Whatever happened to the bullpen cars and golf carts that Major League teams use to use to transport relief pitchers from the home team’s bullpen to the pitching mound? The Yankees had a pinstriped Datsun making this trip for quite a while. I remember thinking how unneighborly it was to force the opposing team’s relievers to walk from their pen to the mound while providing air conditioned transport to the homie’s. Did the occupants of the car listen to the radio during these rides? What did the conversation between driver and pitcher consist of? You’d think teams would have been smart enough to have their bullpen coaches drive these vehicles so they could spend those last precious few moments discussing the best pitching strategies for the passenger to use with the hitters he was about to face. How many times did we see anxious relief pitchers waiting for their ride to show up alongside the bullpen? Where was the vehicle, out getting gas?

Today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant causes me to ponder an even more important historical question about the New York franchise’s use of bullpen vehicles. Bill Zuber became a Yankee pitcher in 1943, just as the exodus of Major League players to wartime service was peaking. The deal that brought this native of Iowa to the Bronx was decidedly one-sided. New York gave the Senators a very good second baseman named Jerry Priddy and a promising young pitcher named Milo Candini in exchange for Zuber and both had very strong first years for Washington in 1943.

Perhaps New York’s motivation for the deal was their certainty that their new acquisition would be around to pitch despite the conflicts going on in Europe and the Pacific at the time. The Yankees knew they could depend on having Zuber on their roster through the War’s end because he was a member of a religious group known as The Amana Church Society. Members of this group were against all wars and were granted conscientious objector status by the US Government. This Society also believed that it was a sin to make use of modern machinery like automobiles. So what would have happened if back in 1943, ’44 or ’45, when Zuber was putting together an 18-23 record for Joe McCarthy’s wartime Yankees as a starter and reliever, the Skipper summoned this big peace-loving right hander from the bullpen to pitch in a game and the Yankees were making use of a bullpen vehicle? Would Zuber have put himself in the passenger seat or would he instead have pointed to the sky, like Bobby Abreu used to do every time he got a base hit and proceed to walk the walk?

In any event, as you can see from the graphic accompanying this post, Zuber went into the restaurant business after his baseball career ended. He found away to merge his new business, his Yankee past and his religiosity by adorning the back page of his restaurant’s menu with his former Yankee Manager’s “Ten Commandments of Baseball.”

Also born on March 26th is this former Yankee infielder and this current day Yankee shortstop.

Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1943 30 NYY AL 8 4 .667 3.89 20 13 2 7 0 1 118.0 100 54 51 3 74 57 1.475
1944 31 NYY AL 5 7 .417 4.21 22 13 5 2 1 0 107.0 101 54 50 5 54 59 1.449
1945 32 NYY AL 5 11 .313 3.19 21 14 5 7 0 1 127.0 121 50 45 2 56 50 1.394
1946 33 NYY AL 0 1 .000 12.71 3 0 1 0 0 0 5.2 10 9 8 2 3 3 2.294
11 Yrs 43 42 .506 4.28 224 65 90 23 3 6 786.0 767 418 374 35 468 383 1.571
CLE (4 yrs) 4 5 .444 5.69 50 3 25 1 0 1 98.0 113 70 62 5 68 47 1.847
NYY (4 yrs) 18 23 .439 3.88 66 40 13 16 1 2 357.2 332 167 154 12 187 169 1.451
WSH (2 yrs) 15 13 .536 4.52 73 14 38 4 1 3 223.0 225 129 112 10 143 115 1.650
BOS (2 yrs) 6 1 .857 3.86 35 8 14 2 1 0 107.1 97 52 46 8 70 52 1.556
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/14/2014.

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