February 18th, 2013

February 18 – Happy Birthday Chad Moeller

moellerWhen Jorge Posada tore his shoulder muscle during the 2008 season, the Yankees tried to make do with the backstop platoon of Jose Molina and today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant. Originally drafted by New York out of high school in 1993, Moeller decided to instead play college ball for USC. Three years later, he was the Twins seventh round pick, even though he had torn his ACL in a home plate collision on the very last play of his USC career. He made his big league debut with Minnesota in 2000 and the following spring he was traded to the Diamondbacks where he would eventually become Randy Johnson’s personal receiver.

Tall for a catcher at 6′ 3″, Moeller had decent defensive skills but he was always a below-average big league hitter. His only shot at starting had come with the Brewers in 2004 and when he averaged just .208 that season, he was destined to remain a second-string receiver for the rest of his career. If you’re going to be a backup position player and survive in the big leagues, your best shot is as a catcher since every team is forced to carry at least two of them at all times. That fact helped Moeller put together an 11-year Major League career with seven different teams.

When Posada’s shoulder started hurting during the 2008 spring training season, the Yanks signed Moeller as a free agent insurance policy. When Hip Hip Jorge’s injury did not improve, the Yanks restricted him to DH duty and brought Moeller up in mid April to back up Molina. The Upland, California native surprised everyone including me by hitting a robust .350 during that initial call-up. When it was later determined that Posada’s shoulder would require season-ending surgery, Moeller was brought back up to the Bronx where he would pretty much become the personal catcher of Yankee veteran Andy Pettitte and Yankee rookie, Darrell Rasner.

Moeller ended up appearing in 41 games for New York that year. It would have been more but neither he (Moeller finished 2008 with a .231 average) or Molina (who finished with a .216 average) were hitting well and the Yankees’ offense was sputtering. That’s why, on July 30th of that season, GM Brian Cashman acquired veteran catcher Ivan Rodriguez from the Tigers for Yankee reliever Kyle Farnesworth. Unfortunately by then, I-Rod’s best offensive days were behind him and he would end up hitting just .218 in pinstripes and the Yankees ended up missing the postseason for the first time in thirteen years. One thing Moeller did exhibit that year was an improved throwing arm. He threw out almost 40% of the runners attempting to steal off of him in 2008, a career high. His lifetime average was just 24%.

New York let Moeller become a free agent after that 2008 season. He spent the following year as a backup catcher with Baltimore. The Yankees re-signed him in April of 2010 and he played his final nine big-league games in pinstripes. He retired with 315 career hits, 29 home runs and a lifetime batting average of .226.

Moeller shares his birthday with this Hall of Fame Yankee second basemanthis long-ago Yankee starting pitcher and this former Yankee closer.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2008 NYY 41 103 91 13 21 6 0 1 9 0 7 18 .231 .311 .330 .640
2010 NYY 9 15 14 2 3 3 0 0 0 0 1 4 .214 .267 .429 .695
11 Yrs 501 1539 1392 146 315 74 7 29 132 2 108 331 .226 .288 .352 .640
ARI (3 yrs) 140 455 400 47 107 28 3 10 47 1 46 94 .268 .344 .428 .772
MIL (3 yrs) 196 669 614 57 125 25 2 14 55 0 38 148 .204 .257 .319 .576
NYY (2 yrs) 50 118 105 15 24 9 0 1 9 0 8 22 .229 .305 .343 .648
MIN (1 yr) 48 139 128 13 27 3 1 1 9 1 9 33 .211 .261 .273 .534
LAD (1 yr) 7 9 8 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .125 .222 .125 .347
CIN (1 yr) 30 49 48 6 8 1 0 1 2 0 0 17 .167 .167 .250 .417
BAL (1 yr) 30 100 89 6 23 8 1 2 10 0 7 16 .258 .313 .438 .751
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/28/2014.