February 12 – Happy Birthday Walter “Monk” Dubiel

dubielDue to an eye ailment, Walter “Monk” Dubiel was not considered healthy enough to serve in WWII and with a sore hip and chronically aching back, there were times he was just barely healthy enough to pitch for the Yankees. New York signed this native of Hartford, Connecticut in 1941 and he spent the next four seasons moving up the organization’s farm system. By 1944, most of the front-line big league pitchers were in the military and Dubiel, who had gone 16-9 for the Yankees’ double A affiliate in Newark the year before, was ready to make his debut in the Bronx. The six foot tall right-hander went 13-13 in his rookie year, threw three shutouts and posted a very respectable ERA of 3.38. But he also pitched 232 innings for Manager Joe McCarthy’s third place ball club, which was fifty more than he had ever pitched in a single season in the minors. He couldn’t match that workload in his sophomore season in pinstripes and his ERA in 1945 climbed to 4.64, but he did manage to post a 10-9 record, which would turn out to be his only winning season as a big league pitcher.

Since the war had ended, all of the Yankee pitchers who had served in the armed forces returned en-masse to New York’s 1946 spring training camp. Dubiel couldn’t make the cut and he was sent back to Newark by McCarthy. Accompanying him to the minor league club that spring was a short stumpy Yankee catcher by the name of Lawrence Berra. Yogi would end up back in pinstripes one day but Monk never did.

In 1947, he became the property of the pitching poor Philadelphia Phillies via the Rule 5 Draft, which eased his path back to the big leagues. He went 8-10 for Philadelphia in 1948, with 2 shutouts and 4 saves. That December he was traded to the Cubs. He would pitch the next three seasons and a tiny part of a fourth in the Windy City and then return to the minors for good. He ended his seven-year career as a Major League pitcher with a 45-53 record and an ERA of 3.87 with 11 saves and 9 shutouts.

Dubiel wore uniform number 14 with New York. Here are my picks for the top five number “14’s” in Yankee history:
Moose Skowron
Lou Piniella
Curtis Granderson
Gene Woodling
Pat Kelly

Dubiel shares his birthday with this former Yankee starting pitcherthis one-time Yankee utility infielder and this one-time New York first-baseman.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1944 NYY 13 13 .500 3.38 30 28 1 19 3 0 232.0 217 93 87 12 86 79 1.306
1945 NYY 10 9 .526 4.64 26 20 4 9 1 0 151.1 157 88 78 9 62 45 1.447
7 Yrs 45 53 .459 3.87 187 97 41 41 9 11 879.1 854 436 378 65 349 289 1.368
CHC (4 yrs) 14 21 .400 3.85 94 32 26 7 3 7 345.2 341 171 148 31 143 123 1.400
NYY (2 yrs) 23 22 .511 3.87 56 48 5 28 4 0 383.1 374 181 165 21 148 124 1.362
PHI (1 yr) 8 10 .444 3.89 37 17 10 6 2 4 150.1 139 84 65 13 58 42 1.310
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/26/2014.

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