August 2012

August 22 – Happy Birthday Wally Schang

Wally Schang was one of baseball’s premier catchers for close to two decades beginning in 1913 and he was also the first of the long line of star players who started behind the plate for baseball’s most successful franchise. The son of a western New York State farmer, he signed with Connie Mack’s Philadelphia A’s team in 1913, when the club was in the middle of its first dynasty. He won his first World Series ring in his rookie season and then became the team’s starting catcher the following year. In 1915, he set a big league record by throwing out six would-be base stealers in a single game. A switch-hitter, in 1916 he became the first player in history to hit home runs from both sides of the plate in the same game. In addition to great defensive skills and above-average power, Schang had an outstanding batting eye. During his 19 seasons in the big leagues he averaged .284 lifetime but his career on-base percentage was a hefty .393.

In 1918, Mack made a trade with the Red Sox that sent Schang to Boston just in time to win his second World Series ring. He would spend three total seasons as starting catcher in Beantown before following his Red Sox batterymate, Babe Ruth to the Yankees in 1921.

Again blessed with good timing, Schang was Miller Huggins’ starting catcher on the 1921, ’22 and ’23 AL Pennant winners and won his third World Series ring on that 1923 Yankee squad, the first World Championship team in franchise history.

During his five seasons as New York’s signal-caller, Schang hit .297 and threw out just less than half the runners who attempted to steal against him. He hit .316 during his first season in pinstripes and .319 in his second. By the 1925 season, he had reached 35 years of age and was losing playing time to the younger Benny Benough. Just before the 1926 Yankee spring training camp opened, New York traded Schang to the Browns for pitcher George Mogridge and cash.

Determined to prove he could still play the game, Schang hit .330 during his first season in St. Louis and caught there for an additional three seasons. His last big league season was 1931 with Detroit, when he was 41 years-old. The depression made it impossible for him to return to  farming, so he kept playing and then coaching in the minor leagues. As one of the Game’s best catchers of his era, Schang deserved a lot more attention in Hall-of-Fame voting than he ever received. He died in 1965 at the age of 75.

Schang shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this current Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1921 NYY 134 516 424 77 134 30 5 6 55 7 78 35 .316 .428 .453 .881
1922 NYY 124 492 408 46 130 21 7 1 53 12 53 36 .319 .405 .412 .816
1923 NYY 84 315 272 39 75 8 2 2 29 5 27 17 .276 .360 .342 .702
1924 NYY 114 421 356 46 104 19 7 5 52 2 48 43 .292 .382 .427 .809
1925 NYY 73 191 167 17 40 8 1 2 24 2 17 9 .240 .310 .335 .645
19 Yrs 1842 6431 5307 769 1506 264 90 59 711 121 849 573 .284 .393 .401 .794
PHA (6 yrs) 575 1943 1619 238 428 69 40 18 202 49 216 207 .264 .369 .390 .759
NYY (5 yrs) 529 1935 1627 225 483 86 22 16 213 28 223 140 .297 .390 .406 .796
SLB (4 yrs) 385 1302 1043 160 307 54 17 21 168 17 215 101 .294 .423 .439 .862
BOS (3 yrs) 323 1160 942 137 274 53 11 4 126 26 181 114 .291 .412 .383 .796
DET (1 yr) 30 91 76 9 14 2 0 0 2 1 14 11 .184 .311 .211 .522
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/22/2013.

August 21 – Happy Birthday Johnny Ellis

When Johnny Ellis first came up to the Yankees in 1969, he was a catcher. The problem for Ellis back then was that the other catcher the Yankees promoted from their farm system that same season was a guy by the name of Thurman Munson. So the Yankees started playing Ellis at first base and he did OK there. In fact, I do remember having hope back then that this New London, CT native would become the next great Yankee first baseman. That didn’t happen.

He was never really more than a part-time player during his four seasons in the Bronx and then was included in a package of players that was dealt to Cleveland in November of 1972 for Graig Nettles. He had his two best big league seasons as Cleveland’s DH and part-time first baseman and then put back on his catching gear when he was traded to Texas in 1976, where he was the Rangers’ backup receiver for the final half-dozen seasons of his 13-year Major League career. In 883 games lifetime, Ellis averaged .262 and hit 69 home runs.

Also born on this same date was this last great Yankee closer before Mariano.

August 20 – Happy Birthday Brad Arnsberg

On August 5, 1987, the Yankees beat the Cleveland Indians, 5-2 to remain in first place in the AL East, a half-game ahead of the Blue Jays and three games ahead of third place Detroit. After the game, reporters asked then Yankee skipper Lou Piniella, what he thought about the performance of his rookie right-hander, Brad Arnsberg, who made his second-ever big league start that evening and got his first-ever Yankee victory. Sweet Lou took a puff on his victory cigar and praised the poise of the then-24-year-old, six foot four inch Arnsberg, telling reporters the youngster had shown a lot of poise out there.

Arnsberg had been showing a lot of poise since he first signed with the Yankees after New York selected him in the first round of the secondary phase of the 1983 MLB Amateur Draft. He had been assigned to the Yankees’ Greensboro farm team in the single A level Sally League and finished 12-5 with 4 shutouts in 1984. In ’85, the Yankees brought him north to Albany-Colonie, which is where I got to see him pitch for the first time and where he frequented the headlines of the Times-Union sports pages all season by going 14-2 for the double A A/C Yankees, with a microscopic 1.59 ERA. That got him a ticket to Columbus and triple A ball, where Arnsberg stumbled at first, going just 8-12 against the stiffer competition. He then rebounded to 12-5 for the Clippers the following year and everyone in the Yankee organization thought he was ready for the big show. His performance that night against Cleveland seemed to confirm those expectations.

Five days after that victory against Cleveland, Piniella gave the kid a start against the Royals and Arnsberg got hammered, giving up seven earned runs and three home runs against the Royals in Kansas City in a 10-1 Yankee loss. By then, New York had fallen a half game behind the Jays. They would end the season in fourth place nine games behind first-place Detroit who nipped ahead of second-place Toronto in September. Arnsberg would make a couple of more relief appearances in pinstripes but never again get the opportunity to start for Piniella or the Yankees. That November, the once promising Yankee right-hander became the property of the Texas Rangers, when New York made him the player to be named later in the trade they had made with Texas for Don Slaught.

After spending much of his first year with Texas on the DL and back in the minors, the Rangers put Arnsberg in their bullpen in ’89 and the following year, he appeared in 55 games, went 6-1 and saved 5, including Nolan Ryan’s 300th victory. That would be the Medford, Oregon native’s finest big leagues season. Within two years he found himself back in the minors and he eventually became a big league pitching coach for the Marlins, Blue Jays and most recently the Astros.

Arnsberg shares his August 20th birthday with this outstanding former Yankee third baseman and this long-ago Yankee pitcher who spent time in San Quentin.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1986 NYY 0 0 3.38 2 1 1 0 0 0 8.0 13 3 3 1 1 3 1.750
1987 NYY 1 3 .250 5.59 6 2 2 0 0 0 19.1 22 12 12 5 13 14 1.810
6 Yrs 9 6 .600 4.26 94 4 29 0 0 6 158.1 159 85 75 27 85 100 1.541
TEX (3 yrs) 8 3 .727 3.44 78 1 25 0 0 6 120.1 111 56 46 15 60 78 1.421
NYY (2 yrs) 1 3 .250 4.94 8 3 3 0 0 0 27.1 35 15 15 6 14 17 1.793
CLE (1 yr) 0 0 11.81 8 0 1 0 0 0 10.2 13 14 14 6 11 5 2.250
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/20/2013.