June 2012

June 30 – Happy Birthday Jerry Kenney

When WWII began, the Yankees were on top of the baseball world with a roster full of stars in the primes of their careers. After Pearl Harbor, when many of those stars volunteered or were required to change uniforms and serve their country, it helped even up the playing talent in Major League Baseball. As a result, the Yankees’ pennant chances immediately declined, and they could no longer be counted on to be the odds on favorite to make it to the World Series every year. When WWII ended and players like DiMaggio, Henrich, Rizzuto, Keller, and Chandler put back on the pinstripes, it wasn’t long before the Yankees were once again winning pennants and rings with regularity.

Yankee history however, certainly did not repeat itself when Vietnam became a full scale war in the mid sixties. First of all, the Yankee’s decline from the status of perennial contender had already occurred by 1965 and was caused not by a military draft but instead by advancing age, injuries and poor personnel decision-making. Guys like Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, Whitey Ford and Ellie Howard were in no danger of being drafted but they were also beyond their playing peaks and could no longer carry the fight to the enemy in the Bronx much less in Khe Sanh or Que. Mandatory military service did however, disrupt the development of several of the crown jewels of the Yankee farm system.

I can remember very clearly the hype surrounding the simultaneous demilitarization of today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant and Bobby Murcer and their mutual return to the Yankees’ 1969 spring training camp. Kenney had excited Yankee fans two seasons earlier, when he had hit .310 in a 20-game late-season call-up and homered in his very first big league at-bat.

After having a sub-five hundred record for three consecutive seasons from 1965 – ’67, and finishing in 6th, last and next-to-last place respectively, the 1968 Yankee team had climbed back into the first division with an 83-79 record. They had assembled a strong young rotation of starting pitchers and the hope was that with Kenney and Murcer back in the lineup, and divisional play commencing that season, the team’s aging offense would be rejuvenated and New York would once again be in the mix for postseason play. The Yankees’ 1969 Opening Day lineup featured Kenney starting in the outfield and Murcer starting at third. Both had two hits and New York beat the Senators 8-4 that day. Yankee fans couldn’t help thinking this young dynamic duo just might be the missing ingredient to the Bronx Bombers’ return to glory.

Murcer would end up having a decent season, hitting 26 home runs and leading the team with 82 RBIs. Kenney would not do nearly as well but did steal 25 bases and hit just enough (.257) to warrant another chance the following year. Defensively, neither player was showing Gold Glove potential at their original positions so Manager Ralph Houk switched them. In 1970, the Yankee fans were pleasantly surprised as the team won 93 games and finished a distant second to the mighty Orioles. Murcer again had a decent year at the plate as did another Yankee youngster, catcher Thurman Munson. Kenney, however, was horrible. He played in 140 games and hit just .193, which should tell you all you needed to know about the incredible thinness of that year’s Yankee roster. He would rebound to hit .262 in 1971 but finally lose his third base starting position to Celerino Sanchez.

By then, George Steinbrenner was in control of the franchise and his management team knew that the Yankees could not challenge the Orioles by starting punchless third basemen like Kenney and Sanchez. That’s why in November of 1972, the first-ever great Steinbrenner-era trade took place with the Yankees trading Kenney, Johnny Ellis, Charley Spikes and Rusty Torrez to the Indian’s for Cleveland’s slick-fielding Graig Nettles.

Kenney would appear in just five games for Cleveland during the 1973 season and never again participate in a big league ball game. He was born in St. Louis on June 30, 1945, six weeks before Japan surrendered, ending WWII. Other Yankees sharing Kenney’s birthday include this former Met herothe shortstop who lost his starting position to Derek Jeter and this one-time Yankee reliever.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1967 NYY 20 74 58 4 18 2 0 1 5 2 10 8 .310 .412 .397 .808
1969 NYY 130 509 447 49 115 14 2 2 34 25 48 36 .257 .328 .311 .639
1970 NYY 140 461 404 46 78 10 7 4 35 20 52 44 .193 .284 .282 .566
1971 NYY 120 395 325 50 85 10 3 0 20 9 56 38 .262 .368 .311 .679
1972 NYY 50 136 119 16 25 2 0 0 7 3 16 13 .210 .304 .227 .531
6 Yrs 465 1594 1369 165 325 38 13 7 103 59 184 139 .237 .326 .299 .626
NYY (5 yrs) 460 1575 1353 165 321 38 12 7 101 59 182 139 .237 .326 .299 .625
CLE (1 yr) 5 19 16 0 4 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 .250 .316 .375 .691
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/30/2013.

June 28 – Happy Birthday Al Downing

I used to get mad at Al Downing every fall. As a nine and ten year-old kid who thought he knew everything about baseball, I blamed Downing for helping convert the Yankees from perennial World Series winners to World Series losers. After all, he lost his only start against the Dodgers in the 1963 4-game sweep disaster and then in 1964, Downing pitched in three of the four games the Yankees lost to the Cardinals that year.

Since then of course, I’ve matured a bit and fully realize that the Yankee’s sudden October misfortune was not Al’s fault. He was actually one of the better pitchers in the American League during the seven full seasons he pitched for New York. During his first five years in pinstripes he was a double digit winner and he led the AL in Ks with 217 during the 1964 season. He was 72-56 during that time and he threw a dozen shutouts. For comparison sake, Andy Pettitte has thrown three shutouts during his 13 plus seasons in pinstripes.

The Yankees traded Downing to the A’s after the 1969 season in return for Danny Cater. He ended up in Los Angeles, pitching for the Dodgers by 1971 and he had his first and only 20-game victory season that included five more shutouts. Downing’s last year with the Dodgers was also his final big league season and he finished his career with 123 victories and 24 shutouts. He will probably be most remembered for giving up Hank Aaron’s 715th home run. He also got a chance to pitch in another World Series game as a Dodger in 1974 against Oakland. Unfortunately, he lost that one too.

Downing was born on this date in 1941, in Trenton, NJ. He shares his June 28th birthday with this former Yankee DH, this one-time NY back-up first baseman and a former teammate and pitcher who was born on the same exact day as Downing.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1961 NYY 0 1 .000 8.00 5 1 3 0 0 0 9.0 7 8 8 0 12 12 2.111
1962 NYY 0 0 0.00 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.000
1963 NYY 13 5 .722 2.56 24 22 2 10 4 0 175.2 114 52 50 7 80 171 1.104
1964 NYY 13 8 .619 3.47 37 35 2 11 1 2 244.0 201 104 94 18 120 217 1.316
1965 NYY 12 14 .462 3.40 35 32 2 8 2 0 212.0 185 92 80 16 105 179 1.368
1966 NYY 10 11 .476 3.56 30 30 0 1 0 0 200.0 178 90 79 23 79 152 1.285
1967 NYY 14 10 .583 2.63 31 28 2 10 4 0 201.2 158 65 59 13 61 171 1.086
1968 NYY 3 3 .500 3.52 15 12 1 1 0 0 61.1 54 24 24 7 20 40 1.207
1969 NYY 7 5 .583 3.38 30 15 5 5 1 0 130.2 117 57 49 12 49 85 1.270
17 Yrs 123 107 .535 3.22 405 317 37 73 24 3 2268.1 1946 938 811 177 933 1639 1.269
NYY (9 yrs) 72 57 .558 3.23 208 175 18 46 12 2 1235.1 1014 492 443 96 526 1028 1.247
LAD (7 yrs) 46 37 .554 3.16 170 120 18 25 12 1 897.2 814 380 315 68 326 532 1.270
OAK (1 yr) 3 3 .500 3.95 10 6 0 1 0 0 41.0 39 19 18 5 22 26 1.488
MIL (1 yr) 2 10 .167 3.34 17 16 1 1 0 0 94.1 79 47 35 8 59 53 1.463
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/28/2013.

June 26 – Happy Birthday Bill Robinson

The dismantling of the greatest Bronx Bomber lineup of my childhood, the offense that fueled the 1961 Yankees to 109 regular season wins, began in November of 1962 when Moose Skowron was traded to the Dodgers for pitcher Stan Williams. At least the Yankees had a decent prospect from their farm system, Joe Pepitone ready to take Skowron’s place. Yogi Berra was next to go when he switched roles from Yankee player to the team’s manager in 1964. Shortstop Tony Kubek’s sore back forced him into retirement after the 1965 season during which the Yankees fell from first to fifth in the AL final regular season standings. When the team fell all the way to last place the following year, all hell broke loose in the Yankee front office. Second baseman Bobby Richardson retired, Roger Maris was traded to the Cardinals for third baseman Charley Smith who would be needed to replace Clete Boyer who had just been traded for today’s Pinstripe Birthday Celebrant.

I remember hoping that Bill Robinson was everything the Yankee front office was promising he would be when they swung that Boyer deal with the Atlanta Braves. They were using superlatives like the “next Mickey Mantle” to describe this then 24-year-old native of McKeesport, PA. He was supposed to be one of those five-tool-players who couldn’t miss at the big league level and he was going to lead the Yankees back to the top of the AL standings.

Unfortunately for Robinson and the Yankees, the young outfielder was no match for the hype that had accompanied him to the Big Apple. He hit a putrid .196 during his first season in New York and Boyer rubbed salt in the wounds of Yankee management by having a career year during his first season in Atlanta. Robinson then improved his batting average to .240 in 1968 but his 6 home runs and 40 RBIs that year reminded nobody of Mantle. When his batting average again went south of the Mendoza line in 1969, a shell-shocked Yankee front-office optioned him to their Syracuse farm team before finally trading him to the White Sox for somebody named Barry Moore.

Eventually, Robinson did evolve into a solid big league outfielder first for the Phillies and then Pittsburgh. He had his best big league season in 1977, when he hit 26 home runs, drove in 104 and batted .304 for the Pirates. Robinson later told Baseball Digest that getting traded to the Yankees was the worst thing that ever happened to him. He said he tried too hard to live up to his press clippings and when he hit a home run during his second-ever at bat as a Yankee, he found himself actually trying to become the next Mantle. The turning point came after he was traded to Chicago. The White Sox wanted Robinson to spend a second consecutive season in the minors. He was ready to call it quits but the parent club’s front office convinced him to be patient instead. He decided then and there to quit trying to be anybody but Bill Robinson and to simply have fun playing the game. Too bad that epiphany didn’t come to him about five years earlier.

Robinson never became the Yankee legend we hoped he would but he does share his birthday with a guy who did. This former New York LOOGY was also born on June 26th.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1967 NYY 116 381 342 31 67 6 1 7 29 2 28 56 .196 .259 .281 .539
1968 NYY 107 378 342 34 82 16 7 6 40 7 26 54 .240 .294 .380 .674
1969 NYY 87 239 222 23 38 11 2 3 21 3 16 39 .171 .226 .279 .505
16 Yrs 1472 4730 4364 536 1127 229 29 166 641 71 263 820 .258 .300 .438 .738
PIT (8 yrs) 805 2649 2451 328 677 135 15 109 412 46 136 469 .276 .313 .477 .790
PHI (5 yrs) 351 1072 996 119 260 61 3 41 136 13 57 201 .261 .300 .452 .752
NYY (3 yrs) 310 998 906 88 187 33 10 16 90 12 70 149 .206 .264 .318 .582
ATL (1 yr) 6 11 11 1 3 0 1 0 3 0 0 1 .273 .273 .455 .727
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 6/25/2013.