November 2011

November 17 – Happy Birthday Jeff Nelson

The great Yankee teams of the late nineties won four World Series because of their bullpens. I’m not just referring to the closers on those teams either. Granted, there was nobody better at getting the last three outs than John Wetteland in 1996 and the great Mariano ever since, but those guys needed a lead to do their job and it was the great Yankee set-up relievers who made that possible. I’m talking about Rivera himself, when he setup for Wetteland, then Mike Stanton, Graeme Lloyd, Ramiro Mendoza and today’s birthday boy, Jeff Nelson. Born in Baltimore in 1966, there was no better right-handed setup man in baseball from 1996 through 2000, than this baby-faced, 6′ 8″ right-hander with a wicked curve. Yankee Manager, Joe Torre never hesitated to insert Nelson in tight ball games whenever an important out was needed with a tough right-handed hitter at the plate. Nelson pitched in 307 regular-season games during that span and almost fifty more during Yankee post season play. Nelson hated to lose and his smart-alecky personality could drive Torre crazy at times, but far more often than not, he got the out the Yankees needed to get at big moments in big games. During the last decade, we Yankee fans have come to realize how difficult it can be to find new Jeff Nelson’s to add to our bullpen. Nelson’s last year in the big leagues was 2006 with the White Sox.

Nelson shares his November 17th birthday with this long-ago Yankee manager and this former Yankee broadcast booth partner of the “Scooter.”

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1996 NYY 4 4 .500 4.36 73 0 27 0 0 2 74.1 75 38 36 6 36 91 1.493
1997 NYY 3 7 .300 2.86 77 0 22 0 0 2 78.2 53 32 25 7 37 81 1.144
1998 NYY 5 3 .625 3.79 45 0 13 0 0 3 40.1 44 18 17 1 22 35 1.636
1999 NYY 2 1 .667 4.15 39 0 8 0 0 1 30.1 27 14 14 2 22 35 1.615
2000 NYY 8 4 .667 2.45 73 0 13 0 0 0 69.2 44 24 19 2 45 71 1.278
2003 NYY 1 0 1.000 4.58 24 0 3 0 0 1 17.2 17 9 9 1 10 21 1.528
15 Yrs 48 45 .516 3.41 798 0 237 0 0 33 784.2 633 329 297 55 428 829 1.352
SEA (8 yrs) 24 23 .511 3.26 432 0 139 0 0 23 447.1 353 177 162 32 232 471 1.308
NYY (6 yrs) 23 19 .548 3.47 331 0 86 0 0 9 311.0 260 135 120 19 172 334 1.389
TEX (1 yr) 1 2 .333 5.32 29 0 9 0 0 1 23.2 17 16 14 3 19 22 1.521
CHW (1 yr) 0 1 .000 3.38 6 0 3 0 0 0 2.2 3 1 1 1 5 2 3.000
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/18/2013.

November 14 – Happy Birthday Xavier Nady

I remember not being thrilled with the July 2008 Yankee trade that brought Nady to the Bronx. It wasn’t so much that I felt New York gave up too much to get the guy. I just thought one of the four players sent to the Pirates in the deal, Russ Ohlendorf would become a good big league pitcher and I didn’t think Nady was that good. I had remembered taking a bit of interest in him when he played for the Mets because his first name caught my attention. He was a decent player back then but I knew his acquisition by New York most likely meant good bye for Bobby Abreu in 2009 and I thought Abreu was still the better all-around player. Then just three days after the deal was made, the Pirates gave up Jason Bay to Boston in a three-way trade that netted Pittsburgh Andy LaRoche, Craig Hansen and Brandon Moss. Theo Epstein really out-maneuvered Brian Cashman that week. Nady played OK for New York during the second half of 2008 while Bay was playing terrific for the Red Sox. Then Xavier had the misfortune of getting hurt in 2009 and missing the entire season.

In the mean time it looks like I might have been wrong about Ohlendorf. After a good first season in Pittsburgh, he’s looked pretty bad the past three. Instead it has been another pitcher the Yankees included in the deal for Nady, the right-hander Jeff Karstens, who could be evolving into a solid starter in Steeltown. As for Xavier, he’s still keeping his suit case packed and moving. After New York didn’t offer him a contract for 2010, he signed with the Cubs and then in 2011 he played quite a bit of first base for the Diamondbacks before breaking his hand. He started out 2012 playing for Washington and then ended the year as a utility outfielder with the World Champion Giants. He turns 34 years-old today.

Nady shares his November 14th birthday with this now infamous cousin of Mariano Rivera and this long ago spit-ball throwing pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2008 NYY 59 247 228 26 61 11 0 12 40 1 14 48 .268 .320 .474 .794
2009 NYY 7 29 28 4 8 4 0 0 2 0 1 6 .286 .310 .429 .739
11 Yrs 939 3199 2932 361 792 158 7 101 406 19 184 617 .270 .324 .432 .756
SDP (4 yrs) 269 845 775 98 204 36 3 25 91 8 51 154 .263 .320 .414 .734
PIT (3 yrs) 269 1050 961 125 289 62 2 36 152 5 59 190 .301 .353 .482 .835
NYY (2 yrs) 66 276 256 30 69 15 0 12 42 1 15 54 .270 .319 .469 .788
ARI (1 yr) 82 223 206 26 51 11 0 4 35 2 10 46 .248 .287 .359 .646
NYM (1 yr) 75 292 265 37 70 15 1 14 40 2 19 51 .264 .326 .487 .813
SFG (1 yr) 19 57 50 6 12 3 1 1 7 0 6 13 .240 .333 .400 .733
CHC (1 yr) 119 347 317 33 81 13 0 6 33 0 17 85 .256 .306 .353 .660
WSN (1 yr) 40 109 102 6 16 3 0 3 6 1 7 24 .157 .211 .275 .486
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/14/2013.

November 12 – Happy Birthday Carl Mays

carl.maysFive months before the Red Sox sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees, they made a trade with Boston during the 1919 regular season for this right-handed starting pitcher. Mays went 9-3 for New York that year and then won 26 games for the 1920 Yankees, during Ruth’s first season in New York. He was also directly involved in one of baseball’s greatest tragedies in August of that same season. It was Mays who threw the pitch that hit and killed Indian shortstop, Roy Chapman.

At the time, Mays had become one of the least liked players in baseball history. There were good reasons why. In the minors, this native of Liberty, KY had converted his conventional pitching delivery to an extreme sidearm, almost underhand delivery. It was unorthodox to say the least which is why Mays was successful with it. One of the keys to becoming a good big league hitter is being able to pick up the ball while it is still in the pitchers hand. This is much easier to do when the guy on the mound throws overhand because at one point the ball is held high over his head, making it much easier to see. Instead of throwing from over his head, May’s pitches came hurling at opposing hitters from his shoe-tops. Back when he pitched, there were no lights in Major League stadiums and pitchers were permitted to rub up the baseball so vigorously that its whiteness was transformed into a hard-to-see rainbow of earth-tone colors. Everyone also smoked back then so there was a very visible, smog-like haze present in the air of every big league game caused by tens of thousands of fans exhaling their cigarette and cigar byproducts. Then there were the shadows, resulting from the fact that with no lights, every Major League game began in the early afternoon when the sun was high but ended in the shadows caused as it made its daily descent behind the tops of stadium walls, toward the western horizon.

This all explains why opposing hitters had a real difficult time seeing Mays’ pitches. Now add to that the fact that Mays was one mean and crazy dude. He had a ferocious temper and hated to lose. He fought just as much with his own teammates as he did with opposing players. His own Yankee Manager, Miller Huggins once said that if he came across Mays lying down in a gutter, he’d kick the guy!  To top it all off, the guy was a self-avowed headhunter. He admitted throwing his already hard-to-see submarine fastball up and in under the chins of hitters as a way of intimidating them. That’s why so many players and sports pundits refused to believe Mays when he claimed the the pitch that killed Chapman was an accident.

Mays helped New York capture its first AL pennant the following season with a 27-9 regular season performance. He then lost two of three decisions in that year’s World Series defeat to the New York Giants and slumped to 12-14 the following year. Mays had pitched over 646 innings of baseball during his two twenty-win seasons in New York and the stress on his left arm must have been horrific. He was able to pitch just 81 innings for the Yankees in 1923 and was sold to Cincinnati. He rebounded with the Reds, winning 20 games in 1924. But his pitching arm was never again the same. He retired after the 1929 season with a 207-126 lifetime record.

Mays shares his November 12th birthday with this former Yankee speedster and this one-time Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1919 NYY 9 3 .750 1.65 13 13 0 12 1 0 120.0 96 34 22 3 37 54 1.108
1920 NYY 26 11 .703 3.06 45 37 8 26 6 2 312.0 310 127 106 13 84 92 1.263
1921 NYY 27 9 .750 3.05 49 38 10 30 1 7 336.2 332 145 114 11 76 70 1.212
1922 NYY 13 14 .481 3.60 34 29 4 21 1 2 240.0 257 111 96 12 50 41 1.279
1923 NYY 5 2 .714 6.20 23 7 11 2 0 0 81.1 119 59 56 8 32 16 1.857
15 Yrs 208 126 .623 2.92 490 324 124 231 29 31 3021.1 2912 1211 979 73 734 862 1.207
BOS (5 yrs) 72 51 .585 2.21 173 112 47 87 14 12 1105.0 918 365 271 8 290 399 1.093
CIN (5 yrs) 49 34 .590 3.26 116 80 25 52 6 4 703.1 740 303 255 10 134 158 1.243
NYY (5 yrs) 80 39 .672 3.25 164 124 33 91 9 11 1090.0 1114 476 394 47 279 273 1.278
NYG (1 yr) 7 2 .778 4.32 37 8 19 1 0 4 123.0 140 67 59 8 31 32 1.390
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/12/2013.

November 10 – Happy Birthday Kenny Rogers

Kenny Rogers was a very good Major League pitcher for two decades. New York signed him to a four-year $20 million free agent contract in December of 1995, when the left hander was thirty years old. He was the second best starting pitcher on the Yankee staff during the 1996 regular season, winning 12 of his 20 decisions. What Kenny Rogers wasn’t able to do, was pitch well for the Yankees in the postseason. If you can’t pitch well in pinstripes in October and you get paid $5 million per season, you’re in trouble. In 1996, Rogers had one of the worst postseason performances of any Yankee starting pitcher in history. He started three games, one each in the ALDS, ALCS and the Series. He did not last longer than three innings in any of them and he gave up 11 total runs for an ERA of 14.14.

Even though New York won all three of those series, Rogers became a player Yankee fans loved to hate. When he followed his disastrous postseason up by going 6-7 in 1997, he was jettisoned to Oakland for a player to be named later, who turned out to be Scott Brosius. From the date of that trade until he retired from baseball at the end of the 2008 season, Rogers went 131-77 for five different teams. In 2006 he went 3-0 in a great postseason performance for Detroit that featured a seven-plus inning shutout victory over the Yankees in the 2006 ALDS. Rogers was born in Savannah, GA, on November 10, 1964.

Kenny shares his November 10th birthday with this former Yankee DH and this long-ago Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1996 NYY 12 8 .600 4.68 30 30 0 2 1 0 179.0 179 97 93 16 83 92 1.464
1997 NYY 6 7 .462 5.65 31 22 4 1 0 0 145.0 161 100 91 18 62 78 1.538
20 Yrs 219 156 .584 4.27 762 474 133 36 9 28 3302.2 3457 1739 1568 339 1175 1968 1.403
TEX (12 yrs) 133 96 .581 4.16 528 252 128 21 6 28 1909.0 1997 986 882 195 686 1201 1.405
DET (3 yrs) 29 25 .537 4.66 75 74 1 0 0 0 440.2 472 251 228 53 158 217 1.430
OAK (2 yrs) 21 11 .656 3.54 53 53 0 10 1 0 358.0 350 162 141 27 108 206 1.279
NYY (2 yrs) 18 15 .545 5.11 61 52 4 3 1 0 324.0 340 197 184 34 145 170 1.497
MIN (1 yr) 13 8 .619 4.57 33 31 0 0 0 0 195.0 227 108 99 22 50 116 1.421
NYM (1 yr) 5 1 .833 4.03 12 12 0 2 1 0 76.0 71 35 34 8 28 58 1.303
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/9/2013.

November 7 – Happy Birthday Jake Gibbs

Born in Granada, MS in 1938, Jerry Dean Gibbs was a superb high school athlete who starred at both football and baseball. In fact, the reason he finally attended Mississippi on a football scholarship was because they were going to permit him to continue to play both sports, which he did with great success. Jake was the starting quarterback for the Ole Miss football team and during his senior year with the Rebels in 1960, he quarterbacked them to an undefeated season and a victory in the Sugar Bowl. Being a pretty pragmatic young man at the time, Gibbs had good reasons for choosing baseball over football as a profession. The first one of course, was money. The Yankees were offering the kid a $100,000 bonus to sign with their team. The second reason Gibbs chose the diamond over the gridiron as his workplace was safety and health related. During his pre-senior years at Mississippi, Gibbs had suffered a series of painful injuries playing football. He knew the pro game was even rougher, making that $100,000 bonus look even more attractive.

So Gibbs became a Yankee. Back then, he was a third baseman but New York’s plan was to convert him to catching and have him some day succeed Elston Howard. At first,  Gibbs resisted the idea but Yankee skipper Ralph Houk, himself a former catcher, convinced Jake that the switch would get him to the big leagues faster and keep him there longer and Houk was right. The Yankees gave Gibbs regular call-ups to the big league roster beginning in 1962 and by ’65, he was Howard’s full-time backup. He then served as the starting Yankee catcher in 1967 and ’68.

Gibbs was a very good defensive receiver but the reason the Yankees weren’t completely happy with him was his lack of offense. He was a lifetime .230 hitter with little power so it wasn’t too tough a decision for New York to return him to the backup catcher role in 1969 in favor of that season’s AL Rookie of the Year, Thurman Munson. Ironically, Gibbs greatest Yankee season took place as Munson’s backup in 1970. In just 49 games that year, he hit more home runs (8) than he ever had in pinstripes plus, he batted .301.

After Gibbs quit playing in 1971, he returned to Ole Miss where he became the Rebel’s highly successful varsity baseball coach. He also did a two-year stint as a catching coach for the Yankees in the early 1990’s.

Gibbs shares his November 7th birthday with this former Yankee relief pitcher and game announcer and this one-time Yankee starting pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1962 NYY 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1963 NYY 4 8 8 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 .250 .250 .250 .500
1964 NYY 3 6 6 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 .167 .167 .167 .333
1965 NYY 37 76 68 6 15 1 0 2 7 0 4 20 .221 .267 .324 .590
1966 NYY 62 202 182 19 47 6 0 3 20 5 19 16 .258 .327 .341 .667
1967 NYY 116 411 374 33 87 7 1 4 25 7 28 57 .233 .291 .289 .580
1968 NYY 124 460 423 31 90 12 3 3 29 9 27 68 .213 .270 .277 .546
1969 NYY 71 245 219 18 49 9 2 0 18 3 23 30 .224 .294 .283 .577
1970 NYY 49 163 153 23 46 9 2 8 26 2 7 14 .301 .331 .542 .874
1971 NYY 70 224 206 23 45 9 0 5 21 2 12 23 .218 .270 .335 .605
10 Yrs 538 1795 1639 157 382 53 8 25 146 28 120 231 .233 .289 .321 .610
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/7/2013.