November 2011

November 30 – Happy Birthday Steve Hamilton

When I was a kid, we’d eat dinner at my Grandmother’s house most Sundays with our entire extended family. As a result, I watched plenty of Sunday afternoon televised Yankee games with my uncle. I was a much more passionate Yankee fan than he was and once the Yankee dynasty crumbled in 1965, he would annoy me by making snide derogatory comments about how bad the team was playing. For example, if a Yankee starter faltered and a reliever was inserted, no matter who came out of the bullpen I could count on my uncle to exclaim, “Not this guy for God’s sakes, even I can hit this guy!”

I’ll never forget the game in late June during the 1970 season when that statement was actually made truthfully. Steve Hamilton had been a very good bullpen pitcher for New York since he was acquired from the Washington Senators in a 1963 trade for Jim Coates. He was 6’7″ tall and a superb athlete, good enough to have played two seasons of NBA basketball in the late fifties for the Lakers. He had performed a variety of pitching roles for New York during his career in pinstripes. He pitched parts of eight seasons for the Yankees, accumulating a 34-20 record, with 36 saves and a 2.78 ERA in 486 innings of work. Manager Ralph Houk would give the big guy a start every now and then and in 1968, used him as New York’s closer and Hamilton led the team with 11 saves that year.

On this particular June day, Sam McDowell and the Indians were killing the Yankees. Houk put Hamilton into pitch the top of the ninth. Hamilton, who was born in Columbia, KY in 1935, was a very funny guy in the clubhouse and on that day, with the game already lost, he decided to have some fun on the field as well. The first hitter he faced was Tony Horton. He had been working on a blooper pitch, which had been nicknamed the “Folly Floater” and had used it against Horton successfully in an game earlier that same season. He decided to employ the pitch again against the Indian first baseman. Hamilton threw Horton two straight folly floaters and Horton almost came out of his spikes trying to hit the softly tossed lobs. Horton fouled both of them off weakly and Thurman Munson caught the second one for an out. Horton’s reaction was hilarious as he tossed his helmet high in the air and actually crawled back into the Indian’s dugout on his hands and knees.

I was amazed to find out that the above clip of this event was actually available on You Tube. Take a look for yourself and see why I finally could agree that a Yankee pitcher threw a pitch even I could hit.

Hamilton shares his November 30th birthday with this one-time Yankee starting pitcher and this one-time Yankee outfielder.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1963 NYY 5 1 .833 2.60 34 0 17 0 0 5 62.1 49 19 18 3 24 63 1.171
1964 NYY 7 2 .778 3.28 30 3 11 1 0 3 60.1 55 24 22 6 15 49 1.160
1965 NYY 3 1 .750 1.39 46 1 13 0 0 5 58.1 47 12 9 2 16 51 1.080
1966 NYY 8 3 .727 3.00 44 3 17 1 1 3 90.0 69 32 30 8 22 57 1.011
1967 NYY 2 4 .333 3.48 44 0 19 0 0 4 62.0 57 25 24 7 23 55 1.290
1968 NYY 2 2 .500 2.13 40 0 24 0 0 11 50.2 37 13 12 0 13 42 0.987
1969 NYY 3 4 .429 3.32 38 0 23 0 0 2 57.0 39 22 21 7 21 39 1.053
1970 NYY 4 3 .571 2.78 35 0 16 0 0 3 45.1 36 16 14 3 16 33 1.147
12 Yrs 40 31 .563 3.05 421 17 181 3 1 42 663.0 556 244 225 51 214 531 1.161
NYY (8 yrs) 34 20 .630 2.78 311 7 140 2 1 36 486.0 389 163 150 36 150 389 1.109
WSA (2 yrs) 3 9 .250 3.95 44 10 13 1 0 2 109.1 108 54 48 10 41 84 1.363
CHC (1 yr) 1 0 1.000 4.76 22 0 12 0 0 0 17.0 24 9 9 1 8 13 1.882
CLE (1 yr) 0 0 3.00 2 0 0 0 0 0 3.0 2 1 1 0 3 4 1.667
SFG (1 yr) 2 2 .500 3.02 39 0 16 0 0 4 44.2 29 15 15 4 11 38 0.896
CHW (1 yr) 0 0 6.00 3 0 0 0 0 0 3.0 4 2 2 0 1 3 1.667
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/30/2013.

November 28 – Happy Birthday Jesus Montero

Yankee Universe got really excited when this kid made his Yankee Stadium big league debut in September of 2011. In 18 end-of-the-season games, he hit .328 with 4 HRs and 12 RBIs and exhibited the opposite field power a right hand hitter needs to prosper in “the new house that Jeter helped build.” He then went 2-for-2 in his only postseason appearance in the Yankee’s Game 4 ALDS victory over Detroit. I joined thousands of other Yankee fans thinking we might really be witnessing the next home-grown pinstriped impact player. But that vision turned out to be a mirage.

If Jesus is going to turn out to be a team’s savior in the next few years, the team that will benefit will be the Mariners. That’s because Brian Cashman rolled the dice after the 2011 playoffs and sent Montero to Seattle with pitcher Hector Noesi in exchange for big Michael Pineda and Jose Campos.

Even though he had a disappointing 2012 season for Seattle (15 HRs, 62 RBIs, .260 ave. and .685 OPS) Montero produced much more for Seattle than Pineda did for NY since the pitcher ended up injured and on the DL the entire year. But Montero also confirmed the doubters who said he hadn’t yet developed the level of catching skills he would need to start at that position in the big leagues. Combine that with his less-than-acceptable .228 average against right-handed pitching last season and you’ll understand why Yankee fans are feeling a lot less bitter about the deal than they would have if Montero had been able to turn his Mariner debut into a breakout performance.

The 6’5″, 225 pound Montero turns just 23-years-old today and barring a blockbuster type deal. Former Yankee receiver Butch Wynegar, who managed Montero in the Minors is pretty confident that this Venezuelan will evolve into a competent Major League receiver. He’s already proved he has the stroke to average .300 against southpaws and I remain confident he will hit 30 home runs per year at the Major League level so I’m really hoping Pineda or Campos does at some point become a significant contributor to the Yankee pitching fortunes.

Today is also the birthday of this long-ago Highlander shortstop and the current pitching coach of the San Francisco Giants

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2011 NYY 18 69 61 9 20 4 0 4 12 0 7 17 .328 .406 .590 .996
3 Yrs 182 732 677 61 175 25 1 22 83 0 44 137 .258 .303 .396 .699
SEA (2 yrs) 164 663 616 52 155 21 1 18 71 0 37 120 .252 .293 .377 .669
NYY (1 yr) 18 69 61 9 20 4 0 4 12 0 7 17 .328 .406 .590 .996
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/28/2013.

November 27 – Happy Birthday Ivan Rodriguez

When Jorge Posada’s shoulder injury put him on the injured reserve list during the early part of the 2008 season, the Yankees hoped the replacement combination of Jose Molina and Chad Moeller would be enough to get them into the playoffs. The duo was OK defensively but their offensive shortcomings left a glaring hole in the Yankee lineup. New York tried to fill that hole when they sent reliever Kyle Farnsworth to Detroit for I-Rod after the All Star break. Unfortunately, the move backfired. Rodriguez hit just .219 during his 33-game stint in pinstripes and the absence of Farnsworth hurt the late-inning relief pitching effectiveness of the Yankee bullpen. Rodriguez has won a World Series (Marlins 03), an AL MVP (1999), thirteen Gold Gloves and has been named to 14 All Star teams. His next major honor will be his almost certain entry into Cooperstown. Ivan was born in Manati, Puerto Rico on November 27, 1971.

He shares his November 27th birthday with this long-ago Yankee pitcher and this slightly more recent Yankee hurler.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2008 NYY 33 101 96 11 21 4 0 2 3 4 4 15 .219 .257 .323 .580
21 Yrs 2543 10270 9592 1354 2844 572 51 311 1332 127 513 1474 .296 .334 .464 .798
TEX (13 yrs) 1507 6166 5754 866 1747 352 28 217 842 81 309 781 .304 .341 .488 .828
DET (5 yrs) 611 2523 2382 300 709 140 17 62 300 30 106 418 .298 .328 .449 .777
WSN (2 yrs) 155 558 522 46 133 25 1 6 68 2 26 94 .255 .291 .341 .632
NYY (1 yr) 33 101 96 11 21 4 0 2 3 4 4 15 .219 .257 .323 .580
HOU (1 yr) 93 344 327 41 82 15 2 8 34 0 13 74 .251 .280 .382 .662
FLA (1 yr) 144 578 511 90 152 36 3 16 85 10 55 92 .297 .369 .474 .843
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/26/2013.

November 26 – Happy Birthday Lefty Gomez

His real name was Vernon Louis Gomez. He was born in Rodeo, CA. If he was still alive, today would be his 103rd birthday. He was part Irish and part Portuguese. His second nickname was “El Goofy” and if I was alive back in the thirties he would have been one of my favorite Yankees. Why? Because by all accounts, Lefty was not just one of the great pitchers of his day he was also the guy who kept the Yankee clubhouse loose.

Yesterday I wrote about how Joe DiMaggio turned into a bitter man but that was only after Gomez retired and could no longer room with him or drink with him. Lefty forced DiMaggio not to take himself so darn seriously all the time. For example, he’d always tell reporters he made DiMaggio famous because nobody knew he could go back on a ball until he started playing behind me.

My favorite Gomez story was when Bill Dickey came out to the mound to ask Gomez what he wanted to throw to Red Sox slugger Jimmie Foxx, who had just come up to the plate. Gomez told Dickey, “I don’t want to throw him nothing. Maybe he’ll get tired of waiting and just leave.”

Despite his sense of humor and his affinity for Manhattan’s nightlife, Lefty was an incredibly good pitcher. He was a four-time twenty game winner and he went a perfect 6-0 in the World Series. After hurting his arm in 1940, Gomez struggled through the final few years of his career and was coldly sold by the Yankee front office to the Boston Braves in January of 1943. His lifetime regular season record in pinstripes was 189 and 101 and included 28 shutouts. The Veterans Committee voted Lefty into the Hall of fame in 1972. He passed away in 1989, at the age of 80.

Gomez shares his November 26th birthday with another former Yankee southpaw pitcherthis one-time Yankee reliever and this former Yankee right-hander.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1930 NYY 2 5 .286 5.55 15 6 3 2 0 1 60.0 66 41 37 12 28 22 1.567
1931 NYY 21 9 .700 2.67 40 26 10 17 1 3 243.0 206 88 72 7 85 150 1.198
1932 NYY 24 7 .774 4.21 37 31 3 21 1 1 265.1 266 140 124 23 105 176 1.398
1933 NYY 16 10 .615 3.18 35 30 3 14 4 2 234.2 218 108 83 16 106 163 1.381
1934 NYY 26 5 .839 2.33 38 33 5 25 6 1 281.2 223 86 73 12 96 158 1.133
1935 NYY 12 15 .444 3.18 34 30 3 15 2 1 246.0 223 104 87 18 86 138 1.256
1936 NYY 13 7 .650 4.39 31 30 1 10 0 0 188.2 184 104 92 6 122 105 1.622
1937 NYY 21 11 .656 2.33 34 34 0 25 6 0 278.1 233 88 72 10 93 194 1.171
1938 NYY 18 12 .600 3.35 32 32 0 20 4 0 239.0 239 110 89 7 99 129 1.414
1939 NYY 12 8 .600 3.41 26 26 0 14 2 0 198.0 173 80 75 11 84 102 1.298
1940 NYY 3 3 .500 6.59 9 5 3 0 0 0 27.1 37 20 20 2 18 14 2.012
1941 NYY 15 5 .750 3.74 23 23 0 8 2 0 156.1 151 76 65 10 103 76 1.625
1942 NYY 6 4 .600 4.28 13 13 0 2 0 0 80.0 67 42 38 4 65 41 1.650
14 Yrs 189 102 .649 3.34 368 320 31 173 28 9 2503.0 2290 1091 930 138 1095 1468 1.352
NYY (13 yrs) 189 101 .652 3.34 367 319 31 173 28 9 2498.1 2286 1087 927 138 1090 1468 1.351
WSH (1 yr) 0 1 .000 5.79 1 1 0 0 0 0 4.2 4 4 3 0 5 0 1.929
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/25/2013.

November 25 – Happy Birthday Nick Swisher

Missing the playoffs for the first time in thirteen years was certainly not the right way to close down the old Yankee Stadium. And since it was evident that George Steinbrenner was not calling the shots any more, we Yankee fans were left to wonder how his heirs would react to the failure. Within a few short postseason months we had our answer. We got Sabathia, we got Burnett and then we got Teixeira. It was powerful three part testimony that even though there had been a changing of the guard at the top, the Yankees were still in it to win it regardless of cost. So why I asked myself were we starting the 2009 season with a guy named Nick Swisher as our starting right fielder?

Since I had been a kid, the Yankees were most successful when they had studs playing right field. Roger Maris from 1960-’64, Reggie from ’77-’81, O’Neill from ’93-2001 and then Sheffield and Abreu. These guys were all third-in-the-lineup type hitters who could carry a team on their backs for long stretches. Nick Swisher was simply not that type of player. Fortunately, he did not have to be.

The 2009 Yankees’ offense was designed to be generated by its $100,000,000 infield. Throw in the rejuvenated starting pitching staff and the cutter-throwing legend in the bullpen and Brian Cashman was figuring he could play Luis Polonia in right field and still make fall ball happen in the new Yankee Stadium that October. New York had traded for Swisher in November of 2008, sending Wilson Betemit and two pitching prospects to the White Sox in exchange for the then 28-year-old switch-hitter. The deal took place before New York decided to go hard after Teixeira and their original intent was to play “Swish” at first base. Once they signed “Tex,” Swisher became part of that year’s outfield mix which included the veteran Johnny Damon, Melky Cabrera and the youngster, Brett Gardner.

Fortunately for Swisher, he started the 2009 season on fire, averaging over .400 with four home runs just two weeks into the season. And although his bat cooled off, his defense, hustle, and clubhouse charisma helped keep him in the lineup and he ended up playing a pivotal role in that glorious 2009 Yankee championship run.

He followed that first season in pinstripes up with a great regular season performance in 2010, hitting a career high .288 with 29 home runs and 89 runs batted in. Then for the second straight season, Swisher’s bat pretty much went silent in the postseason, especially against Texas in the 2010 ALCS. After another solid regular season performance in 2011, Swisher’s postseason blues continued against the Tigers that year as well, when he hit just .211 and failed to deliver at some critical moments with runners in scoring position.

Swisher began his final year in New York knowing that no matter how well he did during the regular season, he needed to produce in October if he was to have any chance of securing a lucrative long-term deal with the Yankees. He went out and had arguably his finest year in pinstripes but then joined just about the entire Bronx Bomber lineup in another postseason offensive hibernation.

The pressure of failing to produce in the fall finally permeated Swisher’s always cheery and optimistic exterior. After being booed at home during the Tiger series, he took his frustration out by criticizing Yankee fans when questioned by reporters after the game.

As I see it, Swisher was a gigantic plus for New York during his four years there and his acquisition should be considered one of the better deals in franchise history. He played above expectation from the moment he put on the pinstripes and even though he struggled in October, he helped New York get to four straight postseasons. Its also worth noting that without Swisher, New York missed the playoffs in 2013 while his new team, the Indians did not.

He shares a birthday with this outfielderthis infielder and this other outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2009 NYY 150 607 498 84 124 35 1 29 82 0 97 126 .249 .371 .498 .869
2010 NYY 150 635 566 91 163 33 3 29 89 1 58 139 .288 .359 .511 .870
2011 NYY 150 635 526 81 137 30 0 23 85 2 95 125 .260 .374 .449 .822
2012 NYY 148 624 537 75 146 36 0 24 93 2 77 141 .272 .364 .473 .837
10 Yrs 1354 5647 4790 758 1220 278 11 231 736 13 746 1208 .255 .358 .462 .820
NYY (4 yrs) 598 2501 2127 331 570 134 4 105 349 5 327 531 .268 .367 .483 .850
OAK (4 yrs) 458 1924 1617 267 406 96 4 80 255 4 260 404 .251 .361 .464 .825
CLE (1 yr) 145 634 549 74 135 27 2 22 63 1 77 138 .246 .341 .423 .763
CHW (1 yr) 153 588 497 86 109 21 1 24 69 3 82 135 .219 .332 .410 .743
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/25/2013.

November 24 – Happy Birthday Randy Velarde

Velarde started his big league career with the Yankees in 1987 and was the team’s top utility infielder for the better part of nine seasons. He looked like a movie star and as each year passed he seemed to get his body more ripped. His best seasons in pinstripes were 1992, when he played in 121 games and hit .272 and 1992, when he batted .301. When the Yankees finally made it back to the playoffs in 1995 after missing the postseason for the previous fourteen years, Velarde was an important and versatile part of that team’s infield. When the Yankees lost in the first round of the playoffs to Seattle however, Velarde hit just .200 in that series. An overreacting George Steinbrenner then fired Manager Bucky Showalter and also replaced starters Mike Stanley, Don Mattingly, Pat Kelly and Velarde, who became a free agent. Randy then signed a pretty nice four-year deal with the Angels for right around $4 million. He had the three best years of his career as an Angel before being traded to the A’s during the 1999 season. He joined the Yankees a second time in 2001 but appeared in just 15 games. He retired after the 2002 season.

This one-time Yankee pitcher and this former Yankee reliever were also born on this date.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1987 NYY 8 22 22 1 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 .182 .182 .182 .364
1988 NYY 48 125 115 18 20 6 0 5 12 1 8 24 .174 .240 .357 .597
1989 NYY 33 111 100 12 34 4 2 2 11 0 7 14 .340 .389 .480 .869
1990 NYY 95 253 229 21 48 6 2 5 19 0 20 53 .210 .275 .319 .594
1991 NYY 80 210 184 19 45 11 1 1 15 3 18 43 .245 .322 .332 .653
1992 NYY 121 461 412 57 112 24 1 7 46 7 38 78 .272 .333 .386 .719
1993 NYY 85 253 226 28 68 13 2 7 24 2 18 39 .301 .360 .469 .829
1994 NYY 77 310 280 47 78 16 1 9 34 4 22 61 .279 .338 .439 .777
1995 NYY 111 432 367 60 102 19 1 7 46 5 55 64 .278 .375 .392 .768
2001 NYY 15 55 46 4 7 3 0 0 1 2 5 13 .152 .278 .217 .495
16 Yrs 1273 4813 4244 633 1171 214 23 100 445 78 463 853 .276 .352 .408 .760
NYY (10 yrs) 673 2232 1981 267 518 102 10 43 209 24 191 395 .261 .332 .388 .720
ANA (4 yrs) 283 1260 1094 168 315 55 8 27 128 27 147 216 .288 .376 .427 .803
OAK (3 yrs) 239 987 873 152 250 41 3 21 77 23 96 169 .286 .363 .412 .775
TEX (1 yr) 78 334 296 46 88 16 2 9 31 4 29 73 .297 .369 .456 .825
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/24/2013.

November 23 – Happy Birthday Luis Tiant

If you’re younger than the age of 30, you probably never saw “El Tiante” pitch in the Major Leagues. That’s your loss. This guy was one of the most entertaining and skilled starting pitchers of his era. I remember his incredible 1968 season when he won 21 games for Cleveland. He was the ace of a very strong Indians pitching staff that led the AL with 23 shutouts, nine of which were thrown by Tiant. Cleveland won a total of 83 games that season and in over a quarter of those victories they shutout the opposition.

Tiant’s career was almost derailed by a rash of injuries and he actually was released by both the Twins and the Braves before he found his true home with the Red Sox. After an awkward start in Beantown, when Tiant went 1-7 in 1971, he won 120 games during the next seven seasons, winning the hearts of Red Sox fans in the process. It was Tiant’s two-hit shutout against the Blue Jays that got the Red Sox into the 1978 one-game playoff for the AL East crown. I still say if the Red Sox could have started this guy instead of Mike Torrez in that next game, Bucky Dent’s heroics never would have happened. Tiant pitched his very best at the the biggest of moments.

In 1979, Tiant joined the Yankees as a free agent and pitched very well for a team torn apart first by management issues and then by the tragic death of their captain, Thurman Munson. Tiant won 13 games that season including his 49th and final career shutout. He fell to 8-9 the following year and the Yankees let him go. For you younger fans who never saw him pitch, think El Duque, only better. Tiant was born on November 23, 1940, in Marianao, Cuba.

This former Yankee starting pitcher was also born on November 23rd as was this one-time Yankee first base prospect and this short-term Yankee first baseman.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1979 NYY 13 8 .619 3.91 30 30 0 5 1 0 195.2 190 94 85 22 53 104 1.242
1980 NYY 8 9 .471 4.89 25 25 0 3 0 0 136.1 139 79 74 10 50 84 1.386
19 Yrs 229 172 .571 3.30 573 484 51 187 49 15 3486.1 3075 1400 1280 346 1104 2416 1.199
BOS (8 yrs) 122 81 .601 3.36 274 238 17 113 26 3 1774.2 1630 709 663 170 501 1075 1.201
CLE (6 yrs) 75 64 .540 2.84 211 160 33 63 21 12 1200.0 939 431 379 126 432 1041 1.143
NYY (2 yrs) 21 17 .553 4.31 55 55 0 8 1 0 332.0 329 173 159 32 103 188 1.301
MIN (1 yr) 7 3 .700 3.40 18 17 1 2 1 0 92.2 84 36 35 12 41 50 1.349
PIT (1 yr) 2 5 .286 3.92 9 9 0 1 0 0 57.1 54 31 25 3 19 32 1.273
CAL (1 yr) 2 2 .500 5.76 6 5 0 0 0 0 29.2 39 20 19 3 8 30 1.584
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.

November 22 – Happy Birthday Lew Burdette

The Yankees certainly thought Lew Burdette was going to be a good big league pitcher, when they signed him to a contract out of the University of Richmond in 1947. He ended up spending most of his first year in minor league ball right in my hometown of Amsterdam, NY, pitching for New York’s Rugmakers farm team in the Class C Canadian-American League.

What might have prevented him from getting the opportunity to become a big winner for the Yankees was the fact that he was a right-handed finesse pitcher who depended on stuff instead of power to get batters out. When righthanders without a good fastball struggled with their stuff on the mound of the old Yankee Stadium, balls had a tendency to fly off the bats of the opposing team’s left-handed hitters and quickly get over the waist-high railing of the old Stadium’s short right field porch. A second reason Burdette probably didn’t get to spend a large part of his career wearing pinstripes was the plethora of starting pitching Yankee GM, George Weiss had assembled in the late 1940s. That stable included Vic Raschi, Allie Reynolds, Eddie Lopat, and Whitey Ford. Weiss also knew if he needed more pitching he could easily exchange young arms for veteran arms, which by the way is exactly what happened to Burdette.

After getting his first call-up to the Bronx in September of 1950 he appeared in two games out of Casey Stengel’s bullpen. Those would be his only two games as a Yankee because in August of the following season, Weiss sent Burdette and $50,000 to the Braves for veteran pitcher Johnny Sain. For the next three seasons, Sain was the best combination starter/reliever in baseball for New York. It was the Braves however, who ended up getting the better end of the deal. Burdette evolved into one of the best starting pitchers in the NL for the next decade. He won 179 games during his 13 seasons with that team which included back-to-back 20-victory seasons in 1958 and ’59. He teamed with Warren Spahn to give Milwaukee one of the Senior League’s elite starting pitching tandems. Together, they won 443 Braves games in thirteen years and led Milwaukee to two NL Pennants and, in what was Burdette’s finest big league moment, the 1957 World Championship versus his original big league employers, the Yankees..

In that Fall Classic, Burdette beat Bobby Shantz, 4-2, in Game 2. He next won Game 5 with a brilliant 1-0 shutout. Then, when Spahn came down with the flu, Burdette got the Game 7 start on just two-days’ rest and threw his second straight shutout in a 5-0 Brave victory. The two teams would meet again the following October and Burdette would beat the Yankees a fourth straight time before New York finally figured him out in Game 7, capturing the Series with a 6-2 victory over their nemesis.

Burdette was one of the meanest men in baseball. He once called Roy Campanella a “nigger” during a Braves-Dodger game. He was also a bit of a flake on the mound, always fidgeting with his arms and hands and talking to both himself and the baseball. He was dogged throughout his career by accusations that he threw a spitball. Burdette did little to dispel the rumor that he doctored the baseball, knowing it kept opposing hitters on edge. He died in 2007, at the age of 80.

This hitting star of the 1998 World Series, this former Yankee shortstop, this former Yankee third baseman and this current Yankee catching prospect share Burdette’s November 22nd birthday.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1950 NYY 0 0 6.75 2 0 0 0 0 0 1.1 3 1 1 0 0 0 2.250
18 Yrs 203 144 .585 3.66 626 373 128 158 33 31 3067.1 3186 1400 1246 289 628 1074 1.243
MLN (13 yrs) 179 120 .599 3.53 468 330 88 146 30 23 2638.0 2698 1163 1036 251 557 923 1.234
STL (2 yrs) 4 8 .333 3.58 29 14 5 3 0 2 108.0 116 53 43 7 19 48 1.250
CAL (2 yrs) 8 2 .800 3.67 73 0 30 0 0 6 98.0 96 42 40 8 12 35 1.102
CHC (2 yrs) 9 11 .450 4.94 35 20 3 8 2 0 151.1 178 91 83 18 23 45 1.328
PHI (1 yr) 3 3 .500 5.48 19 9 2 1 1 0 70.2 95 50 43 5 17 23 1.585
NYY (1 yr) 0 0 6.75 2 0 0 0 0 0 1.1 3 1 1 0 0 0 2.250
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/22/2013.

November 20 – Happy Birthday Clark Griffith

griffith.bigThe Pinstripe Birthday Blog’s celebrant for November 20 was the first guy to manage the Yankees after the franchise was moved to New York from Baltimore. Clark Griffith was born in Clear Creek, MO, in 1869. One of the legendary names in the history of baseball, Griffith began that legend as a very good right-handed pitcher for the National League’s old Chicago Nationals way back in the 1890s. He was a seven-time 20-game winner during his days in the Windy City, where his cunning on the mound earned him the nickname, “The Old Fox.”  He was also a very shrewd follower of the business of baseball. He became the first NL star player to jump to Ban Johnson’s new American League, when it was formed in 1901. At first, Griffith remained in the Windy City, becoming the player-manager of Charley Comiskey’s new Chicago White Sox franchise and winning the first-ever AL pennant in 1901. When the new league transferred its Baltimore franchise to the Big Apple and re-named it the Highlanders in 1903, Griffith took over as skipper of the New York club. He also continued his pitching career at the same time and won 14 games for the Highlanders during his first season as manager.

He remained New York’s field boss until a disagreement with the team’s owners during the 1908 season forced him out of the job and he returned to the NL to manage the Reds. Two years later, he was invited to become part owner of the Washington Senators and from that point on, the name “Griffith” became synonymous with the game of baseball in our Nation’s Capitol. Griffith never got over being fired by New York. As a result, he never tried to disguise his hatred of the Yankees which became a primary reason why subsequent trades between the two clubs hardly ever took place. In 1946, Clark Griffith was inducted into Baseball’s Hall of Fame.

This former Yankee utility outfielder and the only native Italian Yankee were also born on November 20th.

Griffith’s stats as a Yankee pitcher:

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB WHIP
1903 NYY 14 11 .560 2.70 25 24 1 22 2 0 213.0 201 92 64 3 33 1.099
1904 NYY 7 5 .583 2.87 16 11 5 8 1 0 100.1 91 40 32 3 16 1.066
1905 NYY 9 6 .600 1.68 25 7 17 4 2 1 101.2 82 30 19 1 15 0.954
1906 NYY 2 2 .500 3.02 17 2 15 1 0 2 59.2 58 30 20 0 15 1.223
1907 NYY 0 0 8.64 4 0 4 0 0 0 8.1 15 16 8 0 6 2.520
20 Yrs 237 146 .619 3.31 453 372 78 337 22 8 3385.2 3670 1852 1246 76 774 1.313
CHC (8 yrs) 152 96 .613 3.40 265 252 13 240 9 1 2188.2 2445 1249 826 42 517 1.353
NYY (5 yrs) 32 24 .571 2.66 87 44 42 35 5 3 483.0 447 208 143 7 85 1.101
WSH (3 yrs) 0 0 4.50 3 0 1 0 0 1 2.0 3 1 1 1 0 1.500
CHW (2 yrs) 39 16 .709 3.34 63 54 9 46 8 1 479.2 522 231 178 15 97 1.290
STL (1 yr) 11 8 .579 3.33 27 17 10 12 0 2 186.1 195 122 69 8 58 1.358
BOS (1 yr) 3 1 .750 5.63 7 4 3 3 0 0 40.0 47 33 25 3 15 1.550
CIN (1 yr) 0 1 .000 6.00 1 1 0 1 0 0 6.0 11 8 4 0 2 2.167
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/20/2013.

Griffith’s record as Yankee manager:

Rk Year Tm W L W-L% G Finish
3 1903 New York Highlanders 72 62 .537 136 4 Player/Manager
4 1904 New York Highlanders 92 59 .609 155 2 Player/Manager
5 1905 New York Highlanders 71 78 .477 152 6 Player/Manager
6 1906 New York Highlanders 90 61 .596 155 2 Player/Manager
7 1907 New York Highlanders 70 78 .473 152 5 Player/Manager
8 1908 New York Highlanders 1st of 2 24 32 .429 57 8
11 1911 Cincinnati Reds 70 83 .458 159 6
Chicago White Sox 2 years 157 113 .581 275 2.5 1 Pennant
New York Highlanders 6 years 419 370 .531 807 4.5
Cincinnati Reds 3 years 222 238 .483 472 5.0
Washington Senators 9 years 693 646 .518 1364 4.3
20 years 1491 1367 .522 2918 4.3 1 Pennant
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/20/2013.

November 18 – Happy Birthday Gary Sheffield

Over the two-year period between 2004 and 2005, Gary Sheffield was the best player on the Yankee team. He was the best hitter, the best fielder, an outstanding base runner and he had a cannon for an arm. He played hurt. He hustled on every play and for the most part, he got along with his teammates, Manager Joe Torre and the Yankee front office.

He made me a true Gary Sheffield fan during those first two extremely productive years as a Yankee. I loved to watch him take some of the American League’s best pitchers, extremely deep into counts during at bats that would always include at least one and sometimes several rocket line drives into foul territory down the left-field line. I found it incredible that a guy with such a powerful swing did not strike out all that much which meant a very efficient on base percentage and plenty of run scoring production.

Then in 2006, Sheffield injured his wrist in a late April game and didn’t return to the lineup until September. By then, the Yankees had acquired Bobby Abreu to play right field and had probably already decided to not resign Sheffield. Sheffield realized this as well and reacted by becoming a much more divisive force in both the New York media and the clubhouse. He felt unappreciated and responded more like a child than an adult professional athlete who had already earned millions of dollars.

I had the opportunity to watch both Sheffield and Abreu during their Yankee careers and given my druthers, I would much prefer to have a healthy and happy Sheffield as my favorite team’s right fielder. My problem with Gary is that I think he was a pretty significant steroid user and nothing he’s said or done to refute that allegation has succeeded in dampening my suspicions.

Sheffield’s last big league season was 2009. He retired with 509 home runs and a .292 lifetime batting average. He was born in Tampa and turns 43 years old today. He also shares his November 18th birthday with this former Yankee reliever and this one-time Yankee utility player.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2004 NYY 154 684 573 117 166 30 1 36 121 5 92 83 .290 .393 .534 .927
2005 NYY 154 675 584 104 170 27 0 34 123 10 78 76 .291 .379 .512 .891
2006 NYY 39 166 151 22 45 5 0 6 25 5 13 16 .298 .355 .450 .806
22 Yrs 2576 10947 9217 1636 2689 467 27 509 1676 253 1475 1171 .292 .393 .514 .907
FLA (6 yrs) 558 2358 1870 365 538 98 7 122 380 74 424 290 .288 .426 .543 .970
LAD (4 yrs) 526 2276 1866 358 583 88 6 129 367 43 365 232 .312 .424 .573 .998
MIL (4 yrs) 294 1244 1110 138 287 61 3 21 133 43 97 96 .259 .319 .376 .695
NYY (3 yrs) 347 1525 1308 243 381 62 1 76 269 20 183 175 .291 .383 .515 .897
ATL (2 yrs) 290 1257 1068 208 341 63 2 64 216 30 158 108 .319 .412 .562 .974
SDP (2 yrs) 214 900 815 121 260 46 5 43 136 10 66 70 .319 .372 .546 .918
DET (2 yrs) 247 1075 912 159 225 36 1 44 132 31 142 154 .247 .354 .433 .788
NYM (1 yr) 100 312 268 44 74 13 2 10 43 2 40 46 .276 .372 .451 .823
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 11/18/2013.