October 2011

October 31 – Happy Birthday Mickey Rivers

We called him “Mick the Quick.” He was born in Miami, FL on October 31, 1948. Rivers came to the Yankees with Ed Figueroa from the Angels in a December, 1975 trade for Bobby Bonds. That deal was the key that finally fully opened the door to the resurgence of the Yankee dynasty, which took place in the mid seventies. Figueroa was himself a big part of that resurgence, winning more games during his first three seasons in Pinstripes than any other AL pitcher. But it was Rivers who provided the missing piece to the Yankee’s offense and during his first two seasons in New York he was one of the most exciting players in baseball.

Billy Martin inserted Mickey at the top of the Yankee lineup and he became a run-scoring machine during the 1976 season. Even though he missed 25 games he still managed to cross home plate 95 times. He stole 43 bases getting caught just seven times. He had 184 hits and batted .312. The only thing he couldn’t do was walk but he also made contact, striking out just 51 times. He also had a great playoff series against the Royals before falling flat along
with most of the rest of the Yankee lineup in that season’s Fall Classic versus the Reds.

1977 brought more of the same from Rivers. He again sat out two dozen games but his regular-season average climbed to .326. Just as importantly, Mickey played a very good center field for the Yankees, using his speed to get to balls quickly, which more than compensated for his just OK arm. He hit over .390 that year against the Royals in the playoffs and the Yankees won their first World Championship in 15 years.

I saw Rivers up close just one time. We were at Yankee Stadium for an Old Timers game, standing behind the police barricades by the Stadium’s player entrance hoping to catch a glimpse of all the past and present Yankees arriving for that day’s games. Rivers pulled into the Yankee parking lot in a beautiful car. I believe it was a Mercedes. What I’ll never forget is how slowly the guy walked. I think it took him ten minutes to cover the hundred feet between the gate of the parking lot to the player’s entrance to the Stadium. I remember another Yankee player, I believe it was Bucky Dent, pulled into the parking lot a full five minutes after Mickey did that day and got inside the stadium before Rivers did. I remember wondering how any human being who moved as slow as Rivers did could possibly lead the American League in stolen bases, which Mickey had done in 1975.

By 1978, however, Mick’s on-the-field performance began to suffer. His run production decreased and his batting average dipped by sixty percentage points. He also seemed to be growing a bit more nonchalant on the bases and in the outfield. Remember, this was the height of the Billy Martin era. The boozing and mercurial Yankee skipper had lost the reins of his team and the New York Media was having a field day with all of the controversy. Rivers enjoyed the New York nightlife and the ponies. He needed to be kept on a short leash but with the Yankee dugout a circus, there was no one to hold the other end of that leash.

My favorite off-the-field story about Rivers was when he pulled into the Yankee Stadium players’ parking lot before a game after an overnight spent enjoying the Big Apple night life. Allegedly, Mrs. Rivers happened to be laying in wait for her husband in the same parking lot. She proceeded to use her late model luxury car as a battering ram, repeatedly crashing into the Mick’s own late-model luxury car. God I wish I’d been there to see it. Mickey’s gambling and philandering was also taking a toll on his personal finances. Rumor had it that George Steinbrenner was growing very angry with his center-fielder’s constant requests for salary advances and increases.

By 1979 the Yankees had grown weary of Rivers’ behavior on and off the field and they traded him to Texas to reacquire Oscar Gamble. I still miss the guy. Rivers shares his October 31st birthday with this former Yankee catcherthis former Yankee infielder and this other former Yankee infielder.

Year Age Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1976 27 NYY AL 137 612 590 95 184 31 8 8 67 43 13 51 .312 .327 .432 .760
1977 28 NYY AL 138 594 565 79 184 18 5 12 69 22 18 45 .326 .350 .439 .789
1978 29 NYY AL 141 604 559 78 148 25 8 11 48 25 29 51 .265 .302 .397 .699
1979 30 NYY AL 74 307 286 37 82 18 5 3 25 3 13 21 .287 .315 .416 .731
15 Yrs 1468 6026 5629 785 1660 247 71 61 499 267 266 471 .295 .327 .397 .724
TEX (6 yrs) 521 2076 1966 276 596 93 13 22 168 48 73 134 .303 .327 .397 .725
CAL (6 yrs) 457 1833 1663 220 466 62 32 5 122 126 120 169 .280 .330 .365 .695
NYY (4 yrs) 490 2117 2000 289 598 92 26 34 209 93 73 168 .299 .324 .422 .746
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/31/2013.

October 30 – Happy Birthday Danny Tartabull

The 1991 Yankee team was a pretty inept squad. They finished 20 games under 500 and tenth in the American League in both offense and pitching. The cross-town Mets had not done much better that year but they were killing the Yankees in free agent signings as the 1992 spring training season approached. The Amazin’s had already put Eddie Murray, Bobby Bonilla and Bret Saberhagen under contract while Yankee GM Gene Michael had been told not to sign anyone until he got the OK from the chaotic Yankee management team that was supposedly running the franchise during George Steinbrenner’s Howie Spira induced banishment from baseball.

When Michael finally did get permission to pursue a free agent it came with specific orders to sign free-swinging first baseman, Danny Tartabull. Michael did not like Tartabull’s game and was against the move but went ahead and did what he was told to do. The Yankees signed Tartabull to a four-year $20 million free agent contract in January of 1992. Three and a half mostly disappointing seasons later, he was traded to the A’s for Ruben Sierra. His best season in pinstripes was his second when he hit 31 home runs and drove in 103 runs for Manager Buck Showalter’s first Yankee team.

Personally, I liked this guy when he played in New York. He did strike out a lot and was a liability in the field but his OBP as a Yankee was over .370 and he hit 81 home runs and drove in 282 during his three-and-a-half year stay in the Bronx. And who can forget his appearance on the television show Seinfeld? Perhaps Tartabull’s biggest problem was staying healthy. He missed too many games because of injuries and would then struggle to regain his rhythm at the plate each time he returned to the lineup. Danny is the son of former big league outfielder Jose Tartabull. He was born in San Juan on this date in 1962. His last season in the big leagues was 1997 and he hit 262 home runs during his 14-years in the Majors.

This former Yankee third basemanthis one-time Yankee reliever and this long-ago Yankee  spit-baller all share Tartabull’s October 30th birthday.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1992 NYY 123 526 421 72 112 19 0 25 85 2 103 115 .266 .409 .489 .898
1993 NYY 138 611 513 87 128 33 2 31 102 0 92 156 .250 .363 .503 .866
1994 NYY 104 470 399 68 102 24 1 19 67 1 66 111 .256 .360 .464 .823
1995 NYY 59 230 192 25 43 12 0 6 28 0 33 54 .224 .335 .380 .715
14 Yrs 1406 5842 5011 756 1366 289 22 262 925 37 768 1362 .273 .368 .496 .864
KCR (5 yrs) 657 2684 2327 348 674 141 9 124 425 28 325 592 .290 .376 .518 .894
NYY (4 yrs) 424 1837 1525 252 385 88 3 81 282 3 294 436 .252 .372 .473 .845
SEA (3 yrs) 166 671 592 87 164 33 7 28 110 5 71 174 .277 .354 .498 .853
PHI (1 yr) 3 11 7 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 .000 .364 .000 .364
CHW (1 yr) 132 541 472 58 120 23 3 27 101 1 64 128 .254 .340 .487 .827
OAK (1 yr) 24 98 88 9 23 4 0 2 7 0 10 28 .261 .337 .375 .712
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/30/2013.

October 29 – Happy Birthday Jesse Barfield

Born in Joliet, IL on October 29. 1959, Jesse Barfield came to New York from Toronto in exchange for Yankee pitching prospect, Al Leiter, during the 1989 season. Jesse had some great years as a Blue Jay, winning two Gold Gloves and capturing the 1986 AL home run title with a career-high 40. He also had one of baseball’s best throwing arms.

The Yankee team he joined in ’89 had little power from the right side and Jesse provided some, hitting 17 home runs that first year and then 25 more during his first full season in pinstripes. Since he walked a lot also, the Yankees lived with his propensity to strike out a lot and his sub-.250 batting average but when that average slipped to .225 in 1991, Barfield’s days in the Bronx were numbered. He was released by New York in November of 1992 and retired from baseball after a twelve year career that included 241 big league home runs.

During his playing days, Jesse gained a degree of fame by designing furniture. Many of the Jesse’s creations sit in the homes of his ex-teammates. After retiring, Jesse became a hitting instructor, serving in that capacity for both the Astros and Mariners. His sons Jesse and Josh both played Minor League ball.

Jesse shares his October 29th birthday with this former Yankee outfielder and this former Yankee shortstop.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1989 NYY 129 529 441 71 106 19 1 18 56 5 82 122 .240 .360 .410 .770
1990 NYY 153 570 476 69 117 21 2 25 78 4 82 150 .246 .359 .456 .815
1991 NYY 84 321 284 37 64 12 0 17 48 1 36 80 .225 .312 .447 .759
1992 NYY 30 105 95 8 13 2 0 2 7 1 9 27 .137 .210 .221 .431
12 Yrs 1428 5394 4759 715 1219 216 30 241 716 66 551 1234 .256 .335 .466 .802
TOR (9 yrs) 1032 3869 3463 530 919 162 27 179 527 55 342 855 .265 .334 .483 .817
NYY (4 yrs) 396 1525 1296 185 300 54 3 62 189 11 209 379 .231 .339 .421 .760
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/29/2013.

October 26 – Happy Birthday Snuffy Stirnweiss

A Big Apple native and the son of a New York City policeman, Stirnweiss was a superb athlete who became an All-American running back at North Carolina but chose baseball as his career when he signed with the Yankees in 1940. By 1943 he was New York’s starting second baseman and the following year he led the AL in runs, hits, triples and stolen bases. He did even better in 1945, repeating as league leader in all those categories while adding the AL batting crown to his portfolio. But when WWII ended and the Major League rosters were replenished with returning players who had served their country, Snuffy’s production suffered. He was never again the offensive force he had been during the War years but he did evolve into one of baseball’s best defensive second baseman.

He eventually lost the starting second base job to Jerry Coleman. In 1950, the Yankees traded Stirnweiss to the Browns who in turn traded him to Cleveland. When his playing career ended after the 1952 season, Snuffy tried his hand at managing in the minor leagues. When an opportunity in banking opened up in New York City, Snuffy jumped into the new career. He was on his way to a Manhattan luncheon meeting on September 15, 1958 when he was killed in a commuter train wreck in Bayonne, NJ. He was just 40 years old and the father of six young children at the time of the tragedy.

Snuffy shares his birthday with this former Yankee infielder and this one-time Yankee pitching prospect.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1943 NYY 83 325 274 34 60 8 4 1 25 11 47 37 .219 .333 .288 .622
1944 NYY 154 723 643 125 205 35 16 8 43 55 73 87 .319 .389 .460 .849
1945 NYY 152 718 632 107 195 32 22 10 64 33 78 62 .309 .385 .476 .862
1946 NYY 129 560 487 75 122 19 7 0 37 18 66 58 .251 .340 .318 .658
1947 NYY 148 673 571 102 146 18 8 5 41 5 89 47 .256 .358 .342 .700
1948 NYY 141 609 515 90 130 20 7 3 32 5 86 62 .252 .360 .336 .696
1949 NYY 70 190 157 29 41 8 2 0 11 3 29 20 .261 .380 .338 .717
1950 NYY 7 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
10 Yrs 1028 4292 3695 604 989 157 68 29 281 134 541 447 .268 .362 .371 .733
NYY (8 yrs) 884 3800 3281 562 899 140 66 27 253 130 468 373 .274 .366 .382 .747
CLE (2 yrs) 51 111 88 10 19 1 0 1 4 1 22 25 .216 .373 .261 .634
SLB (1 yr) 93 381 326 32 71 16 2 1 24 3 51 49 .218 .324 .288 .612
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/27/2013.

October 25 – Happy Birthday Roy Smalley

The story goes that George Steinbrenner loved the Twins switch-hitting starting shortstop, Roy Smalley. So even though New York already had Bucky Dent and the promising Andre Robertson at that position for the 1982 season, the Yankees sent reliever Ron Davis and a young shortstop prospect named Greg Gagne to the Twins in April of that year to get Smalley in pinstripes. Roy had the bloodlines for baseball. His Dad had been a pretty good infielder for the Cubs in the 40s and his Mom’s brother was long-time big league player and manager, Gene Mauch. But ancestry and being good in Minnesota did not assure success in the Big Apple and Smalley was never comfortable as a Yankee. He did hit 20 home runs his first season in the Bronx and 18 during his second, but by 1984 Steinbrenner had tired of him and he was dealt to the White Sox. In the mean time, Ron Davis never turned into the closer the Twins needed, but Greg Gagne became a popular leader and starting shortstop on the great Twins teams of the 1980s. Roy was born on October 24, 1952, in Los Angeles. In the baseball card pictured with today’s post, doesn’t the larger image of Smalley look a lot like comedian Ray Romano? Also notice on the card that Smalley’s positions are listed as shortstop, third and first base. This is indicative of the early-eighties chaos with the New York lineup. It seemed hardly any Yankee back then knew what position he’d be playing game-to-game.

Smalley shares his October 25th birthday with this former Yankee GM,  this former Yankee reliever , this former Yankee turned medical doctor and this Yankee bullpen coach.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1982 NYY 142 565 486 55 125 14 2 20 67 0 68 100 .257 .346 .418 .764
1983 NYY 130 520 451 70 124 24 1 18 62 3 58 68 .275 .357 .452 .810
1984 NYY 67 227 209 17 50 8 1 7 26 2 15 35 .239 .286 .388 .674
13 Yrs 1653 6595 5657 745 1454 244 25 163 694 27 771 908 .257 .345 .395 .740
MIN (10 yrs) 1148 4676 3997 551 1046 184 21 110 485 15 549 606 .262 .350 .401 .750
NYY (3 yrs) 339 1312 1146 142 299 46 4 45 155 5 141 203 .261 .340 .426 .766
TEX (2 yrs) 119 449 379 37 86 10 0 4 41 6 59 69 .227 .328 .285 .613
CHW (1 yr) 47 158 135 15 23 4 0 4 13 1 22 30 .170 .285 .289 .574
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/25/2013.

October 24 – Happy Birthday Omar Moreno

The starting center field position for the New York Yankees became one of the most glamorous posts in all of sports during the middle of the twentieth century, when it was filled by Earl Combs, Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle who all ended up in Cooperstown. They were followed by Bobby Murcer and then Mickey Rivers, neither of whom made the Hall of Fame but were both very good All Star players in their day. When Rivers slumped in 1979 and the Yankees traded him to Texas, it started a game of musical chair centerfielders in Yankee Stadium that did not end until Bernie Williams was given the job in 1992 and kept it for the next fifteen seasons.

Rupert Jones took over in center in 1980. He was followed by Jerry Mumphrey who did OK his first two seasons in pinstripes but was slumping during the first half of the 1983 season. The Yankee front office responded by trading Mumphrey to Houston for Omar Moreno. Moreno had been the NL stolen base champ for two consecutive seasons with the Pirates and had stolen 96 bases for Pittsburgh in 1980. The problem this Panamanian had was getting on first base. He struck out a lot and did not like to walk. He was only a .250 lifetime hitter and despite all those stolen bases, he scored more than 100 runs in a season only once in his 12-season big league career. In his only full season with the Yankees in 1984, Moreno hit just .259 and scored only 37 runs. Convinced Omar would not be their answer in center field, the Yankee front office made a huge deal in December of 1984 that put another future Hall of Famer in the middle position of New York’s outfield. His name of course was Ricky Henderson. Without a regular spot in the lineup, Moreno struggled to get his average over the .200 mark at the beginning of the 1985 season. New York released him in August of that season and he signed with the Royals. Moreno was born on October 24, 1952.

Henderson started in center for the Yankees for just two seasons. Then came Claudell Washington and Roberto Kelly. Bern Baby Bern shared the position with Kelly for a couple of seasons before taking it over for good in ’92.

Moreno shares his October 24th birthday with this long-ago Yankee outfielder and this much more recent Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1983 NYY 48 163 152 17 38 9 1 1 17 7 8 31 .250 .288 .342 .630
1984 NYY 117 382 355 37 92 12 6 4 38 20 18 48 .259 .294 .361 .654
1985 NYY 34 68 66 12 13 4 1 1 4 1 1 16 .197 .209 .333 .542
12 Yrs 1382 5481 4992 699 1257 171 87 37 386 487 387 885 .252 .306 .343 .649
PIT (8 yrs) 944 3978 3585 530 915 115 59 25 263 412 314 633 .255 .315 .341 .657
NYY (3 yrs) 199 613 573 66 143 25 8 6 59 28 27 95 .250 .283 .353 .635
KCR (1 yr) 24 75 70 9 17 1 3 2 12 0 3 8 .243 .280 .429 .709
ATL (1 yr) 118 386 359 46 84 18 6 4 27 17 21 77 .234 .276 .351 .627
HOU (1 yr) 97 429 405 48 98 12 11 0 25 30 22 72 .242 .282 .326 .608
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/24/2013.

October 23 – Happy Birthday Al Leiter

After coming up through the Yankee farm system, Al Leiter made his Major League debut in pinstripes, starting four games for New York during the 1987 season. The following year he finished 4-4 for the Yankees but was hampered by a chronic blistering problem on the fingers of his pitching hand. At the end of the first month of the 1989 season, New York traded the promising left hander to the Blue Jays for Toronto’s slugging outfielder, Jesse Barfield. Leiter bounced up and down between Toronto and the Blue Jays top farm team for the next three seasons before becoming a semi-regular member of the parent club’s starting staff in 1993. He won a World Series game and a ring that year and by 1995, he’d pitched well enough to sign a nice free agent deal with the Marlins. Al won 27 games and another World Series ring during his two years in Florida but the Marlins dealt him to the Mets in 1998 in the deal for A.J. Burnett. During the next seven seasons he pitched some very good baseball for the Amazin’s, winning 95 games, losing just 67 and pitching seven shutouts. When the Mets let him become a free agent in 2004, he went back to the Marlins, where he had compiled a 3-7 record when he was traded to the Yankees.

I remember watching him pitch his first start as a returning Yankee, a six-plus-inning, three hit victory over Boston’s Tim Wakefield. Unfortunately, Leiter’s career-long struggle with control prevented him from becoming an even more effective member of that 2005 Yankee pitching staff. He retired from baseball after that season and is now a very talented and hard-working television analyst for both the YES and MLB Networks. Al was born on October 23, 1965, in Toms River, NJ. This long-ago Yankee outfielder was also born on today’s date.

October 22 – Happy Birthday Robinson Cano

I remember when the Yankees signed Tony Womack as a free agent to become their starting second baseman for the 2005 season. He was coming off a career year with the NL Champion Cardinals but he was 35 years of age, had no real pop in his bat and didn’t seem to me to be the kind of player Yankee fans would embrace. I was right and Joe Torre evidently agreed with me because Womack lasted only a couple of dozen games as New York’s starting second baseman.

I have to admit, at first, I wasn’t a big fan of Womack’s successor either. When the Yankees brought Robinson Cano up and installed him at second base, he started off pretty slow at the plate, experienced rookie-type-lapses of concentration in the field and he had the most annoying nail-biting habit of any Yankee in history. I was screaming for the Yankees to make a deal to bring back Soriano, confident that “Canoe,” Derek Jeter’s nickname for his new teammate, would be back in Triple A before the 2005 season was over.

This fully underscores why the Yankees paid Joe Torre millions of dollars to make field decisions and never responded to my written offer to manage their team for free. Torre’s patience with his young second baseman was rewarded, when Cano did start hitting, finishing his rookie season with a .297 batting average. He also fielded brilliantly and became a key reason why the Yankees made it to the 2005 postseason.

Cano then got better in both his second and third seasons in the Bronx before he digressed in 2008. I’m not sure what happened to him that season. He made more mistakes in the field and seemed to concentrate less at the plate. Cano had always been an undisciplined hitter, swinging at nearly everything pitchers threw him but during that ’08 season, he was swinging at literally everything.

Fortunately for New York, Cano has been superb ever since, making a gigantic leap during the past three seasons to becoming the best all-around second baseman in the Major Leagues. He makes plays in the field that I’ve never seen made by any second baseman, ever. He has also become one of the game’s great offensive forces, with that special ability to both score and drive in 100 runs per season. Cano is so good and so gifted, it has become easy for fans like me to take some of the extraordinary things he does both at the plate and defensively at second base, for granted. But I don’t think I’m being unfair when I call him out for his propensity to not hustle on the base paths. When he hits a field-able ground ball he often jogs to first and when he hits fly balls deep that have a chance to go out of the park, he goes into his home run trot much too soon. If he’d get rid of both bad habits, he’d be an absolute perfect second baseman. But even if he doesn’t, he’s pretty damn close to perfect anyway.

Cano shares his birthday with one of his current Yankee teammates and this long-ago Yankee pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2005 NYY 132 551 522 78 155 34 4 14 62 1 16 68 .297 .320 .458 .778
2006 NYY 122 508 482 62 165 41 1 15 78 5 18 54 .342 .365 .525 .890
2007 NYY 160 669 617 93 189 41 7 19 97 4 39 85 .306 .353 .488 .841
2008 NYY 159 634 597 70 162 35 3 14 72 2 26 65 .271 .305 .410 .715
2009 NYY 161 674 637 103 204 48 2 25 85 5 30 63 .320 .352 .520 .871
2010 NYY 160 696 626 103 200 41 3 29 109 3 57 77 .319 .381 .534 .914
2011 NYY 159 681 623 104 188 46 7 28 118 8 38 96 .302 .349 .533 .882
2012 NYY 161 697 627 105 196 48 1 33 94 3 61 96 .313 .379 .550 .929
2013 NYY 160 681 605 81 190 41 0 27 107 7 65 85 .314 .383 .516 .899
9 Yrs 1374 5791 5336 799 1649 375 28 204 822 38 350 689 .309 .355 .504 .860
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/22/2013.

October 21 – Happy Birthday Bill Bevens

It took big Bill Bevens eight seasons to pitch his way up the ladder of the Yankee Minor League organization in the late thirties and early forties. He may never have taken the final step if it weren’t for the parent club’s pitching shortage caused by WWII. The six foot three inch right-hander went 4-1 for the 1944 Yankee team and in the process proved he had good enough stuff to earn a shot at making the post war Yankee rotation. He then proceeded to put together 13-9 and 16-13 records for New York the following two seasons and his 2.26 ERA in 1946 was the fourth best figure in the American League. But he also threw 249 innings during that ’46 season, far more than he had ever been asked to pitch since he first broke into the minors.

The wear and tear on Beven’s right arm began to show during the 1947 regular season. His walks per inning and ERA both climbed and he won just 7 games while losing 13. Still, Yankee Manager Bucky Harris had enough faith in the Hubbard, Oregon native to start him in the fourth game of ’47 World Series versus Brooklyn. The contest took place at Ebbets Field and for eight and two thirds innings, Bevens held the Dodgers hitless. It wasn’t what you would call a masterpiece performance. Up to that point he had already walked ten guys and given up a run because of his wildness but it was the World Series for God’s sake and as he faced Dodger pinch-hitter Cookie Lavagetto with runners on first and second, there was still a big “0″ under the “H” alongside the “Home” team on the Ebbets Field scoreboard. Bevens was on the threshold of making history!

But instead, Lavagetto swung late but hard on a Bevens’ fastball and hit it down the right field line. The Yankees were playing Cookie to pull and by the time right fielder Tommy Henrich got to the ball, both Dodger base runners were well on their way to scoring the tying and game-winning runs. Fortunately for Bevens and the Yankees, New York would go on to win the Series in seven games and big Bill would pitch very well in relief in that seventh game.

Bevens then showed up at the Yankee’s 1948 spring training camp with a sore arm. The guy who was one batter away from throwing the first World Series no-hitter in big league history just four months previously, would never again throw a pitch in a big league game. After spending the first eight seasons of his professional baseball career pitching in the Minors trying to get to the Majors, Bevens spent the last six years of his career doing the exact same thing. He finally gave up trying in 1953. He died in 1991 at the age of 75.

Bevens shares his October 21st birthday with this Hall-of-Fame Yankee pitcher and this former Yankee back-up catcher who now gets paid to talk about my favorite team.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO WHIP
1944 NYY 4 1 .800 2.68 8 5 3 3 0 0 43.2 44 18 13 4 13 16 1.305
1945 NYY 13 9 .591 3.67 29 25 2 14 2 0 184.0 174 83 75 12 68 76 1.315
1946 NYY 16 13 .552 2.23 31 31 0 18 3 0 249.2 213 73 62 11 78 120 1.166
1947 NYY 7 13 .350 3.82 28 23 3 11 1 0 165.0 167 79 70 13 77 77 1.479
4 Yrs 40 36 .526 3.08 96 84 8 46 6 0 642.1 598 253 220 40 236 289 1.298
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/21/2013.

October 20 – Happy Birthday Mickey Mantle

Mickey Mantle was my idol growing up as a kid in the west end of Amsterdam, NY.  I can still remember the feeling of euphoria that would come over my entire body on those very rare moments when I would tear open a pack of Topps baseball cards and there hiding in the gum-smelling stack of five pieces of glossy cardboard would be a Mickey Mantle. He was the very best player on the very best baseball team in the world and during my first five years as a Yankee fan, he led New York to five consecutive World Series appearances.

I had a poster of Mantle on my bedroom wall until I was about sixteen years old. I memorized his hitting statistics for each of his 18 regular season and 12 World Series performances. Watching him hit a home run in a televised Yankee contest was as enjoyable for me as seeing the Beatles for the first time on Ed Sullivan, watching the last episode of MASH and the first episode of the Sopranos all in one.

The first time I saw Mantle in person was a Sunday morning outside Yankee Stadium. Me and my brothers were altar boys when we were kids and we never skipped church on Sunday except for the two or three times each summer when our Uncle would take us to Yankee games. I may have been brought up to love Jesus but Mantle was a better hitter.

In any event, on this particular Sunday we were standing behind the police barricades outside the Yankee Stadium player entrance watching the Yankees arrive for that day’s game. All of a sudden, someone much taller than me screamed, “It’s him! It’s him! Here comes Mickey!”

He walked by just five feet in front of me wearing a short-sleeved golf shirt and kaki pants and the first thing I noticed were the muscle lines in his arms. The guy was ripped. People all around me were screaming his name but I was speechless and in total awe. My stupor didn’t matter because Mickey ignored us all. Most of the other Yankee players would wave as they walked by these barricades and some would even stop to shake a fan’s hand or sign an autograph. Not Mantle. He kept his head down and a frown on his face and walked straight inside the Stadium.

I was shocked when just about two hours later, listening to Bob Sheppard announce the Yankee’s starting lineup for that day’s game, I discovered Mickey would not be playing. In fact, Mantle not playing was a pretty common occurrence for me after many of those long drives my Uncle made to Yankee Stadium during the sixties. Instead we’d watch Hector Lopez, Bob Cerv or Jack Reed take the oft-injured Commerce Comet’s spot in the lineup. In fact, not once during the seven seasons we traveled to the Stadium during Mantle’s playing career did I see Mickey hit a home run. I began to think that my being at Yankee Stadium was somehow jinxing Mantle.

I was speechless and in awe the second time I saw Mantle, as well. The span between encounters was about twenty years. I had just landed at the airport in West Palm Beach, Florida with my wife Rosemary and two young children and we were walking to the baggage claim area. Unlike today, the West Palm Beach airport was not very crowded and I was pushing my youngest son in a stroller when I saw a pilot, two stewardesses, and a guy dressed up in a suit carrying a garment bag walking toward us. The guy turned out to be Mickey.

I mumbled to my wife “That’s Mickey Mantle!” and then froze as they continued to walk toward us. Rosemary kept telling me to ask him for an autograph but I couldn’t move or talk. I just stood there with my hands frozen on the stroller handles watching Mantle get closer and closer.  That’s when my bolder better half sprang into action. She walked right up to him and said very nicely, “Mr. Mantle, that’s my husband standing over there and you were his idol growing up as a kid. Could you do me a huge favor and sign this for him?” With that she handed him the US Air Ticket Envelope and a blue Flair marker.

Mantle’s response went something like this. “Did they announce I was in this f _ _ _ _ _ g airport! I hate this God d _ _ _ _ _ d   s_ _ t!  Give me that pen lady.”

My wife and I just stood there speechless, she holding the signed ticket envelope. We realized Mantle’s life must have been filled with these annoying requests but the bitterness and anger in his reaction indicated the man was either deeply disturbed or he lacked even an ounce of humanity, compassion, or plain and simple class. At that moment, Mantle was no longer a hero of mine. When we left the airport I tossed the signed envelope into the garbage container just before I got inside my father-in-law’s Lincoln.

It wasn’t until another fifteen years passed and I watched a news report showing a dying Mantle apologizing to his fans for being such a selfish uncaring jerk all those years, that he became my hero again. I remember after Mantle finished speaking from the hospital press room that day, getting up from my chair in the living room of our house, going to my bedroom and pulling out my metal storage box from the top shelf of my clothes closet. I pulled out that US Air ticket envelope and just stared at that patented Mickey Mantle signature. I finally knew why I had made my Father-in-Law return to the arrival loop of the West Palm Beach Airport that day and why I scrimmaged through that filthy trash can to find the discarded, begrudgingly signed envelope.

Mickey shares his October 20th birthday with this former Yankee PA announcerthis former Yankee outfielder, and this former Yankee bullpen pitcher.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1951 NYY 96 386 341 61 91 11 5 13 65 8 43 74 .267 .349 .443 .792
1952 NYY 142 626 549 94 171 37 7 23 87 4 75 111 .311 .394 .530 .924
1953 NYY 127 540 461 105 136 24 3 21 92 8 79 90 .295 .398 .497 .895
1954 NYY 146 649 543 129 163 17 12 27 102 5 102 107 .300 .408 .525 .933
1955 NYY 147 638 517 121 158 25 11 37 99 8 113 97 .306 .431 .611 1.042
1956 NYY 150 652 533 132 188 22 5 52 130 10 112 99 .353 .464 .705 1.169
1957 NYY 144 623 474 121 173 28 6 34 94 16 146 75 .365 .512 .665 1.177
1958 NYY 150 654 519 127 158 21 1 42 97 18 129 120 .304 .443 .592 1.035
1959 NYY 144 640 541 104 154 23 4 31 75 21 93 126 .285 .390 .514 .904
1960 NYY 153 643 527 119 145 17 6 40 94 14 111 125 .275 .399 .558 .957
1961 NYY 153 646 514 131 163 16 6 54 128 12 126 112 .317 .448 .687 1.135
1962 NYY 123 502 377 96 121 15 1 30 89 9 122 78 .321 .486 .605 1.091
1963 NYY 65 213 172 40 54 8 0 15 35 2 40 32 .314 .441 .622 1.063
1964 NYY 143 567 465 92 141 25 2 35 111 6 99 102 .303 .423 .591 1.015
1965 NYY 122 435 361 44 92 12 1 19 46 4 73 76 .255 .379 .452 .831
1966 NYY 108 393 333 40 96 12 1 23 56 1 57 76 .288 .389 .538 .927
1967 NYY 144 553 440 63 108 17 0 22 55 1 107 113 .245 .391 .434 .825
1968 NYY 144 547 435 57 103 14 1 18 54 6 106 97 .237 .385 .398 .782
18 Yrs 2401 9907 8102 1676 2415 344 72 536 1509 153 1733 1710 .298 .421 .557 .977
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 10/20/2013.

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