September 2011

September 25 – Happy Birthday Phil Rizzuto

I thoroughly enjoyed listening to the Scooter do Yankee games. In fact, his memorable on-air birthday wishes to Yankee fans inspired this Blog. One evening toward the end of his career in the Yankee booth, Rizzuto was going through his list of birthday announcements when the late Bobby Murcer interrupted him by asking when he was born. The Scooter didn’t answer the question so I grabbed my copy of the Baseball Encyclopedia and looked it up. Then I looked up Murcer’s, Mantle’s, Mattingly’s etc. As I did so I began to wonder if I could find a current or former Yankee born on each day of the calendar year and the task became my hobby for the next few months.

I never saw Rizzuto play the game but I grew up listening to him. I loved the fact that he was an unabashed “homer” rooting the Yankees on through good times and bad. His stories were priceless, entertaining me almost as much as a Yankee victory. I loved the one he told about spending his wedding night in a round room so he couldn’t corner his wife, Cora. Or when Bill White would ask him if he thought traffic would be bad after the game and Rizzuto would answer. “I don’t know White and I don’t intend to find out.” Or when a batter would hit a pop up and Rizzuto would say “While that ball’s up in the air Seaver I wanna wish Sophie DeCarlo up in Mt. Vernon a happy 80th birthday.” His induction speech at the Baseball Hall of Fame is a classic.

On the field, Rizzuto was one of the most valuable members of the Yankee teams that won five straight pennants from 1949 through 1953. In all he had seven championship rings and he won the 1950 AL MVP award when he reached the 200 hit plateau with a .324 average. He was an expert bunter, base runner and a terrific fielder. The great Ted Williams often stated that Rizzuto was one of the most talented players he had ever seen.  I’m glad he made it to Cooperstown while he was still alive. He was truly a Yankee legend.

This great Yankee pitcher this former Yankee second baseman and this one-time Yankee reliever were all also born on September 25th.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1941 NYY 133 547 515 65 158 20 9 3 46 14 27 36 .307 .343 .398 .741
1942 NYY 144 613 553 79 157 24 7 4 68 22 44 40 .284 .343 .374 .718
1946 NYY 126 520 471 53 121 17 1 2 38 14 34 39 .257 .315 .310 .625
1947 NYY 153 623 549 78 150 26 9 2 60 11 57 31 .273 .350 .364 .714
1948 NYY 128 539 464 65 117 13 2 6 50 6 60 24 .252 .340 .328 .668
1949 NYY 153 712 614 110 169 22 7 5 65 18 72 34 .275 .352 .358 .711
1950 NYY 155 735 617 125 200 36 7 7 66 12 92 39 .324 .418 .439 .857
1951 NYY 144 630 540 87 148 21 6 2 43 18 58 27 .274 .350 .346 .696
1952 NYY 152 673 578 89 147 24 10 2 43 17 67 42 .254 .337 .341 .678
1953 NYY 134 506 413 54 112 21 3 2 54 4 71 39 .271 .383 .351 .734
1954 NYY 127 373 307 47 60 11 0 2 15 3 41 23 .195 .291 .251 .541
1955 NYY 81 181 143 19 37 4 1 1 9 7 22 18 .259 .369 .322 .691
1956 NYY 31 66 52 6 12 0 0 0 6 3 6 6 .231 .310 .231 .541
13 Yrs 1661 6718 5816 877 1588 239 62 38 563 149 651 398 .273 .351 .355 .706
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/25/2013.

September 22 – Happy Birthday Bob Lemon

Only eight men in baseball history have accomplished what Bob Lemon did in 1978, which is managing a New York Yankee team to a World Series Championship. Only five of those former Yankee skippers are now in Baseball’s Hall of Fame and Bob Lemon is one of them. Unlike fellow Hall of Famer’s Miller Huggins, Joe McCarthy, Bucky Harris and Casey Stengel, however, Bob Lemon got into Cooperstown for his pitching accomplishments and not his managing career.

Born in San Bernardino, CA on September 22, 1922, Lemon was one of the best starting pitchers in baseball from 1947 through 1956. During that span he compiled seven 20-victory seasons and a won-loss record of 197-111 for the Cleveland Indians. He started his managing career in the minors in Hawaii, in 1964 and got his first big league skipper assignment with the Royals in 1970. That lasted for two and a half seasons. Bill Veeck then hired him to manage the White Sox in 1977 and Lemon led the team to a 90-72 record. His Windy City success was short-lived, however and when the Sox got off to a 34-40 start the following year, the guy everyone called “Meat” was fired.

The timing couldn’t have been any better. Billy Martin was then feuding with Yankee superstar, Reggie Jackson and drinking heavily. Between the booze, the constant probing of the Big Apple sports media and the pressure of working for George Steinbrenner, Martin seemed to be on the verge of suffering a nervous breakdown. Lemon’s old Cleveland Indian teammate, Al Rosen, was then working for Steinbrenner as Yankee President and the Boss had grown up in Cleveland and loved hiring ex-Indian stars. When Martin made his famous “One’s a born liar and the other’s a convicted one.” charge, Rosen called Lemon and asked him to take over the Yankees. At the time, New York’s record was a decent 52-42 but they were fourteen games behind the wickedly hot Red Sox.

Lemon employed the exact opposite managing style of the mercurial Martin. He pretty much made out a lineup card and then sat back in the dugout and watched his players play. The Yankee team responded to his almost grandfatherly approach by winning 48 of their next sixty-eight games including the legendary playoff game at Fenway and went on to win their second straight World Series that year. Author Maury Allen wrote in his book “All Roads Lead to October,” that Neville Chamberlain would have loved Lemon because he “brought peace in our time” to the Yankee clubhouse. Never-the-less, afraid of a fan backlash for his removal of the popular Martin, Steinbrenner had already orchestrated the now-famous announcement during the 1978 Yankee Old Timer’s Day that Lemon would be promoted to the GM position after the 1979 season and Billy Martin would again be Yankee manager.

That winter, Lemon’s youngest son was killed in automobile accident. Al Rosen claimed the tragedy took the life out of his old teammate. Lemon started drinking heavily and didn’t seem focused when he returned to manage the Yankees in 1979. When New York got off to a lackluster 34-31 start that season, Steinbrenner fast forwarded the return of Martin and the Yankee managerial position became a game of musical chairs that would continue for the next fifteen years. Lemon would get one more shot at Skippering the Yankees in 1981, replacing Gene Michael with just 25 games remaining in that crazy, strike shortened, split-in-two-parts season.. The Yankees made it to the World Series but they lost to the Dodgers in six games. Lemon’s second tenure as Yankee field boss ended 14 games into the 1982 season when he was replaced by Gene Michael and the game of musical chairs continued. Lemon passed away in January of 2000 at the age of 79.

He shares his September 22nd birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this former Yankee catcher.

Rk Year Age Tm Lg G W L W-L% Finish
6 1978 57 New York Yankees AL 3rd of 3 68 48 20 .706 1 WS Champs
7 1979 58 New York Yankees AL 1st of 2 65 34 31 .523 4
8 1981 60 New York Yankees AL 2nd of 2 25 11 14 .440 6 AL Pennant Second half of season
9 1982 61 New York Yankees AL 1st of 3 14 6 8 .429 5
Kansas City Royals 3 years 425 207 218 .487 3.3
Chicago White Sox 2 years 236 124 112 .525 4.0
New York Yankees 4 years 172 99 73 .576 4.0 2 Pennants and 1 World Series Title
8 years 833 430 403 .516 3.8 2 Pennants and 1 World Series Title
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/22/2013.

September 19 – Happy Birthday Nick Etten

Nick Etten

The best Yankee players from just about any era in the history of the franchise are generally accorded all the trappings and honors that go with that designation. These guys usually receive serious Hall of Fame consideration if not outright induction. Many are honored with plaques in Yankee Stadium’s Monument Park and you still see their names and uniform numbers on the backs of tribute-paying fans who attend Yankee games. At the very least, their names are still mentioned in polls that ask who the top five all-time Yankees are at each position. So I ask why have most Yankee fans never heard of Nick Etten?

Etten was the best and most celebrated player on three consecutive Yankee teams. He captured an AL Home Run crown and an AL RBI title as well. In fact, during his peak three seasons with New York, he drove in more runs than any other player in the American League. He also won a World Series ring in pinstripes. So I ask again, why do so few Yankee fans even know who Nick Etten is?

The answer lies in timing. Etten had his best seasons as a Yankee when the best Yankee players were wearing military uniforms instead of pinstriped ones. Buddy Hassett, who played first for New York in 1942, had been drafted into the military so the Yankees needed to replace him. They targeted Etten, a native of Spring Grove, IL, who was then playing for the Phillies and traded for him. Why Etten? Probably because he was a left handed hitter who could reach the short right field porch of Yankee Stadium and they could get him pretty cheap (two guys named Ed Gettel and Ed Levy and ten thousand Yankee dollars did the trick.)

In any event, Etten did exactly what the Yankees needed him to do, offensively at least, by driving in 309 runs during the next three seasons. Defensively, it was an entirely different story. I’ve read that Etten was the worst defensive first baseman in Yankee history. He refused to move to his right on any ground ball hit that way, which turned the hole between first and second in the Yankee’s wartime infield into a canyon. When he did manage to get his glove on the baseball, Etten had a tough time holding it and throwing it. He made 50 errors during his three seasons as the Yankee’s first baseman. For comparison’s sake, Mark Teixeira has committed a total of just 11 errors during his three seasons as Yankee first baseman and Jason Giambi, who was the poorest defensive first baseman I ever saw play for New York, committed just 36 miscues during his eight seasons with the team.

Etten’s moment in the Bronx sun ended pretty quickly when the drafted and enlisted Yankees returned from military service. He continued to start at first for most of the 1946 season but his average and run production numbers tumbled. In April of 1947, the Yankees sold him back to the Phillies and he was out of the big leagues for good before the end of the 1947 season.

Etten shares his September 19th birthday with this other former Yankee first baseman, this former Yankee pitcher,  this 1958 Cy Young Award winner. and his WWII era teammate of Etten’s.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1943 NYY 154 666 583 78 158 35 5 14 107 3 76 31 .271 .355 .420 .775
1944 NYY 154 680 573 88 168 25 4 22 91 4 97 29 .293 .399 .466 .865
1945 NYY 152 663 565 77 161 24 4 18 111 2 90 23 .285 .387 .437 .824
1946 NYY 108 364 323 37 75 14 1 9 49 0 38 35 .232 .315 .365 .680
9 Yrs 937 3840 3320 426 921 167 25 89 526 22 480 199 .277 .371 .423 .794
NYY (4 yrs) 568 2373 2044 280 562 98 14 63 358 9 301 118 .275 .370 .429 .799
PHI (3 yrs) 304 1203 1040 120 299 52 7 23 128 12 154 63 .288 .381 .417 .798
PHA (2 yrs) 65 264 236 26 60 17 4 3 40 1 25 18 .254 .326 .398 .724
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 9/21/2013.