August 2011

August 30 – Happy Birthday Johnny Lindell

The Yankees signed Johnny Lindell in 1936 as a pitcher and during the next six seasons he developed really well in the New York farm system, culminating with an outstanding 23-4 record with the 1941 Newark Bears. He deserved a shot at the big show but the only problem was that Yankee Manager Joe McCarthy’s team was already loaded with good pitchers at the time and he simply didn’t need another one. So instead, he asked Lindell if he’d like to try the outfield. Johnny had always been a good hitter, averaging close to .300 in the minors, so the 6’5″ native of Greely, CO gave it a shot. By 1943, with WWII raging and the regular Yankee outfield disrupted by military service, Lindell became New York’s regular center fielder. He had his best big league season in 1944 when he averaged .300, poked 18 home runs, drove in 103 and led the AL in triples for the second straight year.

Off the field, Lindell was a party animal. It was rumored that Yankee GM George Weiss spent more money on private detectives he hired to keep night-time tabs on his outfielder than he paid Lindell in salary. By 1945, it was Lindell’s turn to serve his country. When he returned to the Yankees in 1946, New York’s regular outfielders and prospects had all returned from military service and Lindell gradually moved into the role of the team’s fourth outfielder.

Johnny had some great moments as a Yankee. He hit .500 and drove in seven runs during the Yankees 1947 World Series victory over the Dodgers. In 1949, he hit a huge home run in New York’s final regular season series against Boston, enabling the Yankees to move into a tie with the Red Sox. But as each year passed, Lindell found himself playing less and less and during the 1950 season, Weiss sold him to the Cardinals. When St. Louis released him at the end of that season, Lindell decided to go back to pitching and returned to the minors to work on his knuckle ball. He put together an amazing 24-9 season in the Pacific Coast League in 1952 and the Pirates promoted him to their starting rotation the following year. But Lindell couldn’t throw his knuckle ball over the plate for strikes and the more patient big league hitters simply waited him out. He finished the ’53 season with a 5-16 record and led the NL in walks. By the following year he was out of the big leagues for good.

Johnny shares his birthday with his former Yankee teammate, a third baseman with the nickname of “Bull.” This former Yankee pitcher was also born on August 30th.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1941 NYY 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
1942 NYY 27 24 24 1 6 1 0 0 4 0 0 5 .250 .250 .292 .542
1943 NYY 122 500 441 53 108 17 12 4 51 2 51 55 .245 .329 .365 .694
1944 NYY 149 646 594 91 178 33 16 18 103 5 44 56 .300 .351 .500 .851
1945 NYY 41 181 159 26 45 6 3 1 20 2 17 10 .283 .363 .377 .740
1946 NYY 102 369 332 41 86 10 5 10 40 4 32 47 .259 .328 .410 .738
1947 NYY 127 513 476 66 131 18 7 11 67 1 32 70 .275 .322 .412 .734
1948 NYY 88 344 309 58 98 17 2 13 55 0 35 50 .317 .387 .511 .898
1949 NYY 78 247 211 33 51 10 0 6 27 3 35 27 .242 .350 .374 .724
1950 NYY 7 25 21 2 4 0 0 0 2 0 4 2 .190 .320 .190 .510
12 Yrs 854 3121 2795 401 762 124 48 72 404 17 289 366 .273 .344 .429 .773
NYY (10 yrs) 742 2850 2568 371 707 112 45 63 369 17 250 322 .275 .343 .428 .770
PHI (2 yrs) 18 31 23 3 8 1 0 0 4 0 8 5 .348 .516 .391 .907
PIT (1 yr) 58 109 91 11 26 6 1 4 15 0 16 15 .286 .404 .505 .909
STL (1 yr) 36 131 113 16 21 5 2 5 16 0 15 24 .186 .287 .398 .685
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/31/2013.

August 28 – Happy Birthday Mike Torrez

If you’ve watched televised Yankee broadcasts over the years you’ve probably heard Kenny Singleton and Michael Kay talk about “the worst trade in Montreal Expo history.” It took place a few weeks before Christmas in 1974 with the Baltimore Orioles. The Expos received Baltimore’s veteran starting pitcher, Dave McNally and the Birds’ outfielder Rich Coggins in exchange for Singleton, who was then a young up and coming outfielder and today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant.  Mike Torrez was a nibbler, a big young right-hander who tried to keep the ball away from the middle of the plate. As a result, he typically threw lots of pitches and walked lots of hitters when he was on the mound but he also won more games than he lost.

Neither McNally or Coggins was still playing for Montreal by the second half of the 1975 season. Singleton became one of the great outfielders in Baltimore franchise history. Torrez became the ace of Baltimore’s staff in ’75 going 20-9. He then got traded again but only because Oakland A’s owner Charley Finley had decided to unload his superstar free-agent-to-be, Reggie Jackson before Mr. October walked away on his own. Baltimore thought Reggie could get them back to the World Series so they were willing to sacrifice Torrez to get him.

The native of Topeka, Kansas continued his winning ways in Oakland, going 16-12 in 1976. He then won three of his first four starts the following season but like Reggie a year earlier, Torrez was in the final year of his contract and any good player in his option year playing for a Charley Finley owned team automatically received a new nickname; Trade Bait!

That’s how the Yankees were able to secure Torrez’ services at the end of April in 1977. Finley accepted Doc Ellis, Larry Murray and Marty Perez in exchange for big Mike. With Catfish Hunter’s shoulder ailing at the time, Torrez immediately became a key ingredient to the Yankees’ drive to their 1977 World Championship. He won 14 games that year, joining Ron Guidry (16) Ed Fiqueroa (16) and Don Gullett (14) as double digit winners. Then after losing Game 3 in the ’77 ALCS to Kansas City, Torrez won both Game 3 and the Series-clinching Game 6 for New York in the World Series. It was without a doubt, his finest moment in pinstripes but not his most important moment in franchise history.

That happened less than a year later, after the Yankees let Torrez sign as a free agent with the Red Sox and after he won 16 games for Boston and helped them tie New York for the 1978 AL East Division title. More specifically, it took place on October 2, 1978 in the late afternoon in Boston’s Fenway Park, with two outs in the seventh inning of the playoff game between the Red Sox and the Yankees to determine who would advance to the ALCS against the Royals that year. Torrez had shutout the Yankees thus far that afternoon and was ahead 2-0 when Bucky Dent walked to the plate with Chris Chambliss and Roy White on base. Torrez third pitch to the light-hitting shortstop was inside and Dent pulled it just high enough to clear the top of the Green Monster.

Torrez went on to pitch four more seasons for the Red Sox and a total of six more in his big league career. When he retired in 1984, he had won 185 regular-season games and lost 160.

Today is also the birthday of the Yankee starting pitcher who opposed Mike on that fateful afternoon in Boston and the Yankee right fielder who made the famous play that saved that victory for New York. This starting second baseman on the Yankees’ first championship team and this former Yankee reliever were both also born on August 28th.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB IBB SO WHIP
1977 NYY 14 12 .538 3.82 31 31 0 15 2 0 217.0 212 99 92 20 75 1 90 1.323
18 Yrs 185 160 .536 3.96 494 458 13 117 15 0 3043.2 3043 1501 1340 223 1371 84 1404 1.450
STL (5 yrs) 21 18 .538 4.12 71 52 5 8 1 0 347.2 330 179 159 22 208 15 180 1.547
BOS (5 yrs) 60 54 .526 4.51 161 157 1 36 4 0 1012.2 1108 558 507 87 420 31 480 1.509
MON (4 yrs) 40 32 .556 3.75 102 97 2 22 2 0 640.2 610 303 267 42 303 19 296 1.425
OAK (3 yrs) 19 13 .594 2.87 45 43 0 15 4 0 295.0 263 114 94 18 101 2 129 1.234
NYM (2 yrs) 11 22 .333 4.47 48 42 5 5 0 0 260.0 282 145 129 19 131 11 110 1.588
NYY (1 yr) 14 12 .538 3.82 31 31 0 15 2 0 217.0 212 99 92 20 75 1 90 1.323
BAL (1 yr) 20 9 .690 3.06 36 36 0 16 2 0 270.2 238 103 92 15 133 5 119 1.371
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/31/2013.

August 26 – Happy Birthday Morgan Ensberg

The Yankees were hoping Ensberg could replicate some of the offensive magic he exhibited during his 2005 breakout year with the Astros, when they signed that season’s NL Silver Slugger Award winner in 2008 to play some first base. Unfortunately, the Redondo Beach, CA native could not produce and the Yankees released him after he appeared in just 28 games. He shares his birthday with this Yankee utility infielder.

Today is a good time to share my All-Time Lineup of Yankee players with August birthdays:

1B Johnny Ellis 8/21/48
2B Bobby Richardson 8/19/35
3B Graig Nettles 8/20/44
SS Bobby Meacham 8/25/60
Jorge Posada 8/17/71
OF Gene Woodling 8/16/83
OF Brett Gardner 8/24/83
OF Melky Cabrera 8/11/84
DH Ron Blomberg 8/23/48
SP Ron Guidry 8/28/50
RP Ron Davis 8/6/55
CL John Wetteland 8/21/66
MGR Ralph Houk 8/9/19
OWN Jake Ruppert 8/5/1867

August is a strong birthday month for Yankee third basemen. In addition to Nettles, both 1998 World Series MVP Scott Brosius and the
slick-fielding Billy “The Bull” Johnson have birthdays this month.

Here are Ensberg’s Yankee and lifetime stats:

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2008 NYY 28 80 74 6 15 0 0 1 4 0 6 22 .203 .263 .243 .506
8 Yrs 731 2580 2204 340 579 102 10 110 347 22 332 436 .263 .362 .468 .830
HOU (7 yrs) 673 2435 2072 323 551 99 10 105 335 22 319 395 .266 .367 .475 .843
SDP (1 yr) 30 65 58 11 13 3 0 4 8 0 7 19 .224 .308 .483 .790
NYY (1 yr) 28 80 74 6 15 0 0 1 4 0 6 22 .203 .263 .243 .506
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/26/2013.

August 25 – Happy Birthday Dooley Womack

Dooley Womack was one of the best relief pitchers on two of the worst Yankee teams in the franchise’s fabled history. He made his pinstripe debut in April of 1966, as a seldom used member of Manager Johnny Keane’s Yankee bullpen. When that team proceeded to win just four of its first twenty games that season, Ralph Houk took over for Keane and the “Major” took a liking to Womack. The right-handed native of Columbia, SC appeared in 42 games during his rookie season and compiled a 7-3 record with 4 saves in 75 innings of work. He joined Fritz Peterson and Steve Hamilton as the only members of that year’s Yankee pitching staff to compile a winning record and Womack’s 2.64 ERA was the lowest of any New York pitcher with a minimum of ten decisions. That Yankee team became the first to finish in last place since the 1912 Highlanders accomplished the dreaded feat fifty-four seasons earlier.

Womack was even better the following year but the Yankees, unfortunately were not. He led the ’67 squad with 18 saves and 65 appearances plus lowered his ERA to 2.41. The Yankees as a team, in the mean time, won just two more games than they did the season before and finished in ninth place in the ten-team American League. Womack got off to a slower start in ’68 and his Yankee days became numbered that July, when New York acquired the veteran, Lindy McDaniel. The born-again reliever took the struggling Womack’s role as the Yankee bullpen’s right-handed saver and filled it superbly. Dooley found himself demoted to middle inning relief assignments. The Yankees traded Womack to the Astros after the 1968 season for an outfielder named Dick Simpson. Within the next 12 months, Dooley was traded to Seattle, Cincinnati and finally Oakland. In his last big league appearance, while pitching for the A’s in September of 1970, Womack tore his rotator cuff.

Dooley was actually a nickname given to him as a child. His real first name was Horace. Womack became much more famous after Jim Bouton’s best selling book “Ball Four” was published. In it the Bulldog wrote this reaction after learning he’d been traded by the Seattle Pilots for Womack; “Maybe it’s me for a hundred thousand and Dooley Womack is just a throw-in. I’d hate to think at this stage of my career I was being traded even-up for Dooley Womack.” I was an avid card collector as a kid and I bet I had at least ten of the 1967 Topps Womack Card pictured with today’s post.

Womack was born on August 25, 1939. He shares a birthday with this former switch-hitting Yankee shortstop and this free agent reliever New York signed in 2010.

August 23 – Happy Birthday Ron Blomberg

On April 6, 1973, Ron Blomberg came to the plate in the top of the first inning at Fenway Park with two outs and bases loaded during that year’s Yankee season opener and he was walked by the Red Sox’ Luis Tiant. “Boomer” thus became the very first designated hitter in Major League history. Blomberg, who was born on this date in 1948 in Atlanta, GA, might have been in the Hall of Fame today if there were no left handed pitchers in baseball. He hit over .300 against righties during his eight-year big league career and just .215 against southpaws. Unfortunately, a string of injuries limited him to one game of action during the Yankee’s 1976 AL Championship year and he was released by New York the following season.

On his Website, RonBlomberg.com, Boomer informs visitors that it was his boyhood dream to play baseball for the New York Yankees. He certainly had lot’s of options back then. According to his Wikipedia article, Blomberg is the only high school athlete ever selected to Parade Magazine’s High School All American Teams for the sports of baseball, football and basketball. When he graduated from high school in 1967, the Yankees made him their number 1 draft choice. Two years later, he was in the Bronx wearing pinstripes.

A dependable clutch hitter, I’ll always be convinced that Boomer would have been a key cog in the Yankee championship teams of the late seventies if he could have stayed healthy. He had a great eye at the plate and he didn’t strike out a lot. Being such a great athlete, you have to believe that given the opportunity, this guy could have learned to hit left-handers.

But Boomer just couldn’t stay off the DL. He had the knees of Mickey Mantle with chronically sore shoulders thrown in for good measure. Still, after the Yankees released him, he was able to secure a three-year , half-million dollar deal with the White Sox. His final big league season was 1978.

Blomberg shares his August 23rd birthday with this one-time Yankee catcher and the outfielder the Yanks traded to get Red Ruffing.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1969 NYY 4 7 6 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 .500 .571 .500 1.071
1971 NYY 64 216 199 30 64 6 2 7 31 2 14 23 .322 .363 .477 .840
1972 NYY 107 341 299 36 80 22 1 14 49 0 38 26 .268 .355 .488 .843
1973 NYY 100 338 301 45 99 13 1 12 57 2 34 25 .329 .395 .498 .893
1974 NYY 90 301 264 39 82 11 2 10 48 2 29 33 .311 .375 .481 .856
1975 NYY 34 119 106 18 27 8 2 4 17 0 13 10 .255 .336 .481 .817
1976 NYY 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 .000 .000 .000
8 Yrs 461 1493 1333 184 391 67 8 52 224 6 140 134 .293 .360 .473 .832
NYY (7 yrs) 400 1324 1177 168 355 60 8 47 202 6 129 117 .302 .370 .486 .856
CHW (1 yr) 61 169 156 16 36 7 0 5 22 0 11 17 .231 .280 .372 .652
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/23/2013.

August 22 – Happy Birthday Jeff Weaver

I was a Ted Lilly fan back when the left-hander was a young Yankee trying to become part of New York’s starting rotation in 2001 and the beginning of  ’02. Then, right around the 2002 All Star break, the Yankees made a complicated and confusing three team trade involving the Oakland A’s and Detroit Tigers. When it was over, Lilly was no longer a Yankee and the flaky Jeff “Dream” Weaver was. All of baseball loved Weaver’s stuff during his three-plus year stay in Motown, but he pitched poorly as a starter in Pinstripes, forcing Joe Torre to use him in the bullpen. After posting a 7-9 record and a 5.99 ERA in 2003, the Yankees sent Weaver to the Dodgers for the infamous Kevin Brown. He won 25 games for LA in 2004 and ’05 and then joined Angels as a free agent in 2006. The Angels than traded Weaver to the Cardinals just before the 2006 All Star break to make room on their roster for Jeff’s younger brother Jered. The deal worked out OK for both siblings because Jeff went onto help the Cardinals win the 2006 World Series and Jered has become the ace of the Angels staff.

In ’07, Jeff signed with Seattle but pitched poorly that year and ended up back in the minors in 2008. Weaver, who was born on August 22, 1976 in Northridge CA, then rejoined the Dodgers and Joe Torre in Los Angeles the following season. He has not pitched in the big leagues since 2010. Ted Lilly, who now also pitches for the Dodgers, went on to achieve double-digit victory totals for nine straight seasons after being dealt by New York.

Weaver shares his birthday with the starting catcher on the Yankees’ very first World Championship team and this current Yankee reliever.

Year Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB SO HBP WHIP
2002 NYY 5 3 .625 4.04 15 8 3 0 0 2 78.0 81 38 35 12 15 57 3 1.231
2003 NYY 7 9 .438 5.99 32 24 3 0 0 0 159.1 211 113 106 16 47 93 11 1.619
11 Yrs 104 119 .466 4.71 355 274 21 16 7 2 1838.0 1997 1023 961 227 516 1214 124 1.367
LAD (4 yrs) 38 29 .567 4.20 139 75 14 3 2 0 567.1 574 278 265 66 163 400 38 1.299
DET (4 yrs) 39 51 .433 4.33 111 109 1 10 3 0 714.2 728 372 344 76 209 477 54 1.311
NYY (2 yrs) 12 12 .500 5.35 47 32 6 0 0 2 237.1 292 151 141 28 62 150 14 1.492
STL (1 yr) 5 4 .556 5.18 15 15 0 0 0 0 83.1 99 49 48 16 26 45 6 1.500
LAA (1 yr) 3 10 .231 6.29 16 16 0 0 0 0 88.2 114 68 62 18 21 62 4 1.523
SEA (1 yr) 7 13 .350 6.20 27 27 0 3 2 0 146.2 190 105 101 23 35 80 8 1.534
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/22/2013.

August 21 – Happy Birthday John Wetteland

If you’re a Yankee fan, one of the great moments you have engrained into your memory is the on-field celebration that ensued after Charley Hayes caught that foul pop for the third and final out of the 1996 World Series. John Wetteland was in the middle of that celebration. He had just earned his fourth save of that Series and was about to be named Series MVP. That performance followed a regular season in which the right-hander had led the AL with 43 saves and made the All Star team.

Wettland, who was born on today’s date in 1966 in San Mateo, CA, was an indispensable Yankee that year and I can recall being completely blown away when just one month later, the Yankees let him become a free agent. The right-hander continued to perform as one of the game’s top closers after he signed with Texas and saved another 150 games during the final four seasons of his big league career. That Yankee front office decision to let Wetteland walk and hand the closer role to a young Mariano Rivera seemed so risky at the time. It doesn’t anymore, does it?

Wetteland shares his August 21 birthday with this former Yankee first baseman.

August 20 – Happy Birthday Graig Nettles

The Dodgers and the Yankees clashed in the 1978 World Series. If you’re a longtime Yankee fan, older than forty, you simply don’t forget Graig Nettles defensive performance in Game 3.

The Dodgers had jumped ahead of New York two games to none and only “Puff” and his well worn fielders glove prevented them from making it three straight wins. He made four great plays in that game. In the third inning, with New York ahead 2-1 and Bill Russell on first base with two outs, Nettles made a diving stop of Reggie Smith’s smash down the third base line and threw Smith out at first. In the fifth, with the tying run on second, Nettles again victimized Smith by knocking down his screaming line drive, preventing the run from scoring and holding the Dodger outfielder to an infield single. The very next hitter, Dodger first baseman, Steve Garvey then scorched another one at Nettles who backhanded it on his knees and forced the runner at second to end the inning. Yet again in the visitors’ half of the sixth, the Dodgers loaded the bases and with two outs, LA second baseman Davey Lopes sent another hard grounder in Nettles’ direction. After another great stop, he made another great throw, forcing the runner at second and ending another Dodger threat. As he ran toward the dugout, the Yankee Stadium crowd gave him a standing ovation. Nettles won Gold Gloves in 1977 and ’78.

Born in San Diego on this date in 1944, he was the AL Home Run Champion in 1976 and when he retired after the 1988 season he had 390 career home runs. 319 of those blasts were the most home runs ever by an AL third baseman. Great glove, plenty of power, a quick irreverent wit and that Game 3 performance sum up my memories of the Yankee’s All-Time great third baseman.

Nettles shares his August 20th birthday with this long-ago Yankee who ended up in San Quentin and  this one-time top Yankee pitching prospect.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1973 NYY 160 641 552 65 129 18 0 22 81 0 78 76 .234 .334 .386 .720
1974 NYY 155 638 566 74 139 21 1 22 75 1 59 75 .246 .316 .403 .718
1975 NYY 157 647 581 71 155 24 4 21 91 1 51 88 .267 .322 .430 .753
1976 NYY 158 657 583 88 148 29 2 32 93 11 62 94 .254 .327 .475 .802
1977 NYY 158 664 589 99 150 23 4 37 107 2 68 79 .255 .333 .496 .829
1978 NYY 159 662 587 81 162 23 2 27 93 1 59 69 .276 .343 .460 .803
1979 NYY 145 588 521 71 132 15 1 20 73 1 59 53 .253 .325 .401 .726
1980 NYY 89 369 324 52 79 14 0 16 45 0 42 42 .244 .331 .435 .766
1981 NYY 103 402 349 46 85 7 1 15 46 0 47 49 .244 .333 .398 .731
1982 NYY 122 461 405 47 94 11 2 18 55 1 51 49 .232 .317 .402 .719
1983 NYY 129 519 462 56 123 17 3 20 75 0 51 65 .266 .341 .446 .787
22 Yrs 2700 10228 8986 1193 2225 328 28 390 1314 32 1088 1209 .248 .329 .421 .750
NYY (11 yrs) 1535 6248 5519 750 1396 202 20 250 834 18 627 739 .253 .329 .433 .762
MIN (3 yrs) 121 348 304 40 68 12 3 12 34 1 39 67 .224 .314 .401 .715
SDP (3 yrs) 387 1380 1189 158 282 43 2 51 181 0 171 176 .237 .333 .405 .739
CLE (3 yrs) 465 1947 1704 224 426 59 2 71 218 12 220 183 .250 .338 .412 .750
ATL (1 yr) 112 201 177 16 37 8 1 5 33 1 22 25 .209 .294 .350 .644
MON (1 yr) 80 104 93 5 16 4 0 1 14 0 9 19 .172 .240 .247 .488
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/20/2013.

August 18 – Happy Birthday Mike Ferraro

Mike Ferraro was given two chances to make his living working for the New York Yankees at third base. Neither ended up very successfully. The first opportunity came in the mid sixties, when Clete Boyer was nearing the end of his career in pinstripes. New York had signed Ferraro in 1962 when he was just 17-years-old and the native of Kingston, NY spent the next six years progressing slowly through the Yankee farm system. When the Yankees traded Boyer to the Braves after the 1966 season, the front office did not think Ferraro was quite ready to take over the hot corner and they gave that job to Charley Smith whom New York acquired from St Louis in their Roger Maris trade.

Smith was a bust in 1967 so when the team’s 1968 spring training camp opened, Yankee Skipper Ralph Houk announced that Ferraro would battle future Braves Manager, Bobby Cox for the position. Ferraro had a fantastic spring, leading the Yankees in hitting with a .353 average during the exhibition season. When the team headed north to begin the regular season, everyone figured Ferraro would start at third, everyone except Ralph Houk. For whatever reason, the Major went with Cox and Ferraro got into just 23 games that season with New York. The following April, he was traded to Seattle. After bouncing around a bit for the next few years, he finally got the opportunity to play regularly for the Milwaukee Brewers in 1972. When he hit just .255 in 124 games that year, the Brewers released him. He returned to the Yankee organization as a free agent but instead of playing, he got into coaching. By ’74 he was managing in the Yankee farm system.

During the ’68 season, while Ferraro was sitting on the Yankee bench watching Cox play third, he’d often sit next to another utility infielder on that same team, the veteran Dick Howser. The two became good friends and when Howser was named Yankee Manager in 1980, he made Ferraro his third base coach. That New York team won 103 games that year and captured the AL East Division crown. Even with that level of success, Steinbrenner had ridden Howser and his coaching staff hard all season long. The Yankees had to face the Kansas City Royals in the ALCS playoffs for the fourth time in five years.

New York lost the first game and were behind by a run with two outs the eighth inning of the second contest when Bob Watson hit a ball against Kauffman Stadium’s left field wall with Willie Randolph on first. Wilson played the carom perfectly but overthrew his cutoff man. In the mean time, third base coach Ferraro was signaling Randolph to try and score. KC third baseman, George Brett was in perfect position to field Wilson’s overthrow and he made a perfect relay to catcher Darrel Porter who tagged Willie just an instant before he made contact with home plate. The Yankees ended up losing that game and according to Bill Madden, author of “Steinbrenner: The Last Lion of Baseball,” the irate Yankee owner ran to the section of seats where the Yankee wives were watching the game and screamed at Ferraro’s wife that “her F’ing husband had cost New York the game.” He wanted Ferraro fired immediately and replaced by Don Zimmer. The whole embarrassing episode convinced Howser he could no longer work for Steinbrenner. Ironically, Ferrarro continued on as Yankee third base coach the following season. He later managed the Indians and Royals.

Ferraro shares his August 18th birthday with this Hall of Fame pitcher who appeared in ten games as a Yankee and this former outfielder.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1966 NYY 10 32 28 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 .179 .281 .179 .460
1968 NYY 23 89 87 5 14 0 1 0 1 0 2 17 .161 .180 .184 .364
4 Yrs 162 532 500 28 116 18 2 2 30 0 23 61 .232 .265 .288 .553
NYY (2 yrs) 33 121 115 9 19 0 1 0 1 0 5 20 .165 .207 .183 .389
MIL (2 yrs) 129 411 385 19 97 18 1 2 29 0 18 41 .252 .283 .319 .602
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/18/2013.

August 17 – Happy Birthday Jorge Posada

When I started really following Yankee baseball I was six-years-old. Back then, I thought guys like Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, Yogi, Moose Skowren, Bobby Richardson, and Whitey Ford played forever. I soon realized that wasn’t true. I’m now watching my fourth generation of Yankee legends reach their twilight years. Among them is Jorge Posada. He turns 41 years-old today. Hall of Famer, Bill Dickey caught the most games in a Yankee uniform, with 1,709. The great Yogi Berra caught 1,692. By the end of the 2010 season Posada had caught 1,573 games in pinstripes. Jorge payed attention to numbers and stats and I’m sure that when he signed his last Yankee contract, he thought that by the end of that deal, which was 2011, he’d be setting the record for most games caught in a Yankee uniform. He probably also thought when he signed that last contract that he’d have a real good shot at reaching both the 300 home run (he finished with 275) and 2,000 hit (1664) milestones by 2011 as well. None of that happened. Instead, what was supposed to be the crowning season of Posada’s outstanding career as a Yankee turned into a season of  trial and tribulation.

It began with Brian Cashman telling him in spring training that he would never again be behind the plate in a Yankee game. I found myself painfully admitting that Jorge’s catching skills were worse than ever. So many pitches got by him. His throws to second were not nearly as hard and accurate as they once were and after 16 seasons of squatting behind home plate, his base-running had gone from bad to scary awful. So I did not disagree with the decision to make Jorge a full-time DH.

That didn’t work out as planned either.  Posada seemed to have forgotten how to hit right-handed in 2011. To make matters worse, he has was twice demoted by Yankee Manager Joe Girardi prior to nationally televised games versus the hated Red Sox, once to ninth in the batting order and then to a seat on the Yankee bench. One thing many fans and sportswriters seem to forget is that professional athletes don’t perform well because of talent alone. The reason they are the very best at what they do is that they believe they can do it. When Posada walked to the plate to face a left-hander, he never once was telling himself he had no chance to hit the guy. He honestly believed in his head that he could hit anybody at anytime, so when his GM or his Manager told him he couldn’t do something anymore, he didn’t believe it for a second. Not because he was stubborn or in denial but because he had to believe it to have any chance at being successful. And in a memorable August 13th game against Tampa last year when he drove in six runs, Posada got an opportunity to show Cashman, Girardi and a national television audience that although the end of his career may have been near, it wasn’t over yet. And no true Yankee fan will forget his 6 for 14 hitting performance and .579 OBP against Detroit in last year’s ALDS. It turned out to be a fitting curtain call for a true Yankee warrior.

Yankee fans won’t see the likes of Posada ever again. Solid switch-hitting catchers who are among the top two or three best in the league at their position for about a dozen straight seasons are pretty hard if not impossible to come by. Throw in five World Series rings and an equal number of All Star game selections and Silver Slugger awards plus all the good things he did off the field and you realize what a pleasure it was to have this man catch for your favorite baseball team all that time.

Hip-Hip-Happy Birthday Jorge! Posada shares his birthday with this former Yankee reliever and this former Yankee DH.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1995 NYY 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1996 NYY 8 15 14 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 .071 .133 .071 .205
1997 NYY 60 224 188 29 47 12 0 6 25 1 30 33 .250 .359 .410 .768
1998 NYY 111 409 358 56 96 23 0 17 63 0 47 92 .268 .350 .475 .824
1999 NYY 112 437 379 50 93 19 2 12 57 1 53 91 .245 .341 .401 .742
2000 NYY 151 624 505 92 145 35 1 28 86 2 107 151 .287 .417 .527 .943
2001 NYY 138 557 484 59 134 28 1 22 95 2 62 132 .277 .363 .475 .838
2002 NYY 143 598 511 79 137 40 1 20 99 1 81 143 .268 .370 .468 .837
2003 NYY 142 588 481 83 135 24 0 30 101 2 93 110 .281 .405 .518 .922
2004 NYY 137 547 449 72 122 31 0 21 81 1 88 92 .272 .400 .481 .881
2005 NYY 142 546 474 67 124 23 0 19 71 1 66 94 .262 .352 .430 .782
2006 NYY 143 545 465 65 129 27 2 23 93 3 64 97 .277 .374 .492 .867
2007 NYY 144 589 506 91 171 42 1 20 90 2 74 98 .338 .426 .543 .970
2008 NYY 51 195 168 18 45 13 1 3 22 0 24 38 .268 .364 .411 .775
2009 NYY 111 438 383 55 109 25 0 22 81 1 48 101 .285 .363 .522 .885
2010 NYY 120 451 383 49 95 23 1 18 57 3 59 99 .248 .357 .454 .811
2011 NYY 115 387 344 34 81 14 0 14 44 0 39 76 .235 .315 .398 .714
17 Yrs 1829 7150 6092 900 1664 379 10 275 1065 20 936 1453 .273 .374 .474 .848
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 8/17/2013.