April 16th, 2011

April 16 – Happy Birthday Frank Fernandez

fernandez.jpgToday’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant was a back up catcher during his days in pinstripes. Many have served in that role through the ages. The current guy in that position, Chris Stewart, was a surprise choice at the very end of the 2012 spring training season, a move that ended the popular Francisco Cervelli’s two-year hold on the same job. The first backup catcher in franchise history was Jack O’Connor. Known as Rowdy Jack, he was already 37 years old when he spent the 1903 season backing up Monte Beville behind home plate. O’Connor batted just .203 that season but that was nine points better than Beville hit. Benny Bengough was the Yankees’ first long-term second catcher. He started his pinstripe career in 1923 behind Wally Schang on the depth chart and finished it eight seasons later behind Hall-of-Famer, Bill Dickey. Dickey’s longtime backup was the Norwegian receiver, Arndt Jorgens, who spent all eleven of his big league seasons in that role. Yogi Berra’s backup during the first half of his Yankee careeer was Charley Silvera. Elston Howard took over from him and gradually took over the starting catcher’s job from Berra. During the fabled 1961 Yankee season, the Yankees had three catchers, Howard, Berra and Johnny Blanchard all hit more than 20 home runs in the same season. Former Yankee Manager, Ralph Houk had been a backup catcher for New York during his playing days and the team’s current Manager, Joe Girardi, ended his Yankee playing days in that supporting role behind Jorge Posada. Some of the better known Yankee backup catchers included Rick Dempsey, Fran Healy, and Ivan Rodriguez.

I can clearly recall when today’s Pinstripe Birthday celebrant took over as the Yankee backup receiver. It was during the 1967 season. Elston Howard had broke completely down physically that year and the Yankees inserted his backup, Jake Gibbs as starting catcher and brought up Frank Fernandez from their farm system to become the new number two receiver. The native of Staten Island held onto that backup role for three seasons until Thurman Munson arrived in the Bronx in 1969. Fernandez was then traded to the A’s. He was decent defensively and had some power in his bat, hitting 12 home runs for New York in 1969 and then 15 for the A’s a season later. He also had a keen batting eye. His biggest problem was that when he did swing the bat he usually missed the ball. Frank averaged about one strikeout every three times at bat during his Yankee career and averaged just .199 during the six seasons he played in the big leagues.

Fernandez shares his birthday with one of the only five Yankee players to have collected three thousand base hits during their big league careers and this former Yankee utility infielder.

Year Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1967 NYY AL 9 32 28 1 6 2 0 1 4 1 1 2 7 .214 .281 .393 .674
1968 NYY AL 51 171 135 15 23 6 1 7 30 1 0 35 50 .170 .341 .385 .726
1969 NYY AL 89 298 229 34 51 6 1 12 29 1 3 65 68 .223 .399 .415 .814
6 Yrs 285 903 727 92 145 21 2 39 116 4 4 164 231 .199 .350 .395 .744
OAK (2 yrs) 98 304 261 31 55 6 0 15 45 1 0 41 79 .211 .322 .406 .728
NYY (3 yrs) 149 501 392 50 80 14 2 20 63 3 4 102 125 .204 .372 .403 .775
CHC (2 yrs) 20 61 44 11 7 1 0 4 4 0 0 17 17 .159 .393 .455 .848
WSA (1 yr) 18 37 30 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 0 4 10 .100 .194 .100 .294
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 4/15/2013.