January 2011

January 31 – Happy Birthday Rafael Santana

Santana.jpgIf you asked most Yankee fans if the shortstop Rafael Santana played for the Yankees their likely response would be, “No, he played for the Mets.” That’s because the native of the Dominican Republic did spend the vast majority of his six-season big league career with the Amazin’s and he was the starting shortstop on their 1986 World Championship team. What most of us forget is that the Yankees traded for Santana before the 1988 spring training season and he became the team’s starting shortstop for then Manager, Billy Martin. Martin, as usual got fired during the 1988 season and was replaced by Lou Piniella, who stuck with Santana at short for the rest of that year. Rafael hit just .240 for that season and his on base percentage was a putrid .289. He also played very mediocre defense. He then suffered an elbow injury that caused him to miss the entire 1989 season, making it an even easier decision for the Yankee front-office to release him when his contract expired at the end of that year. That explains why Yankee fans have a hard time remembering Santana played in pinstripes.

This hardly remembered but very effective Yankee pitcher from the late 1950s, this long ago outfielder and this more recent Yankee outfielder prospect were all also born on January 31.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1988 NYY 148 521 480 50 115 12 1 4 38 1 33 61 .240 .289 .294 .583
7 Yrs 668 2183 2021 188 497 74 5 13 156 3 138 234 .246 .295 .307 .601
NYM (4 yrs) 483 1632 1514 134 376 62 4 8 113 2 103 171 .248 .296 .310 .607
STL (1 yr) 30 17 14 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 2 2 .214 .353 .214 .567
CLE (1 yr) 7 13 13 3 3 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 .231 .231 .462 .692
NYY (1 yr) 148 521 480 50 115 12 1 4 38 1 33 61 .240 .289 .294 .583
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 2/11/2014.

January 27- Happy Birthday Angel Berroa

Berroa was awful during his 21-game, early-part-of-the-season tenure with the Yankees in 2009. This Dominican’s best years were spent with the Royals. In fact, he was the 2003 AL Rookie of the Year with Kansas City, when he hit .287, smacked 17 home runs, stole 21 bases and drove in 87 runs as the team’s first-year starting shortstop. With New York during their championship season, he was hitting just .136 when he was released that July. He was quickly picked up by the Mets, enabling him to finish his 2009 season in the same city it began.

Berroa shares his birthday with this former Yankee pitcher and this one and this one too.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
2009 NYY 21 24 22 6 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 6 .136 .174 .182 .356
9 Yrs 746 2807 2575 329 665 118 21 46 254 50 117 460 .258 .303 .374 .677
KCR (7 yrs) 627 2496 2300 293 606 103 20 45 235 50 94 407 .263 .305 .384 .689
NYM (1 yr) 14 31 27 4 4 1 0 0 2 0 3 6 .148 .233 .185 .419
LAD (1 yr) 84 256 226 26 52 13 1 1 16 0 20 41 .230 .304 .310 .614
NYY (1 yr) 21 24 22 6 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 6 .136 .174 .182 .356
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/29/2014.

January 18 – Happy Birthday to a Number 5

pinstripe.5.jpgThe Yankees began wearing numbers on their uniforms during the 1929 season. At the time, the numbers were assigned based on the player’s batting position in the lineup. This explains how Babe Ruth got the number three and how Yankee cleanup hitter, Lou Gehrig secured number 4. The first Yankee to wear number 5 during that 1929 season was the talented but very moody outfielder, Bob Meusel. In 1930, it was assigned to the great second baseman, Tony “Poosh em Up” Lazzeri. Frank Crosetti was then given the number in 1932 and Lazzeri was switched to number 6. Crosetti wore number 5 for the next four seasons except for a short time, during the 1935 season, when the Crow got hurt and couldn’t play. The Yankees called up Nolen Richardson to take Crosetti’s spot. Richardson was a middle infielder who had played a bit of big league ball for the Tigers before he joined the Yankee organization. Since he was replacing Crosetti, the Yankees gave him uniform number 5. The 32-year-old native of Chattanooga, TN did not see much action in that uniform, appearing in just 12 games that season before getting sent down to New York’s Newark Bears farm club. He became a popular member of the Bears and was the Captain of the 1937 team that is still considered to be one of the greatest teams in minor league history, winning the International League’s pennant that season by 25 1/2 games.

Joe DiMaggio did not get number 5 until 1937, his second season in pinstripes. Crosetti kept the number until 1936. Joltin Joe wore number 9 as a rookie in 1936. Incredibly, the Yankees didn’t even keep number 5 in mothballs during the WWII when Joe D served in the military. Instead, New York’s wartime first baseman, Nick Etten got the number in 1943 and kept it until the Yankee Clipper returned for the 1946 season.

The only other Yankee born on this date was still waiting to make his debut in pinstripes as the 2014 regular season approaches.

Year Tm G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS
1935 NYY 12 49 46 3 10 1 1 0 5 0 3 1 .217 .265 .283 .548
6 Yrs 168 509 473 39 117 19 5 0 45 8 23 22 .247 .282 .309 .591
DET (3 yrs) 120 351 324 28 78 14 4 0 30 8 17 17 .241 .279 .309 .587
CIN (2 yrs) 36 109 103 8 29 4 0 0 10 0 3 4 .282 .302 .320 .622
NYY (1 yr) 12 49 46 3 10 1 1 0 5 0 3 1 .217 .265 .283 .548
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 1/22/2014.